BE INSPIRED

"The Graduate School provides vast resources for doctoral students, including a wide range of courses conducive to training and thesis work." Dominic Ponattu, CDSS

Course Catalogue

Spring 2015


Course Type: core course

Course Content

Doctoral theses supervised by Thomas Gautschi, Henning Hillmann and Frauke Kreuter respectively, will be discussed.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Colloquium
Colloquium
11.02.14
27.05.14
Wednesday
17:15
18:45
Parkring 47, room 217


Course Type: core course

Course Content

Doctoral theses supervised by Bernhard Ebbinghaus, Frank Kalter and Irena Kogan, respectively, will be discussed.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Colloquium
Colloquium
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesday
19:00
21:15
tbd.

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: DIS

Credits: 2+8

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Literature Review

You should be prepared to address the following questions: What makes a particular research question an interesting question? Is it an important question? What contributions would this question and the answers make to the scholarly literature? What strategies are there to answer your research question(s)?


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback on writing students' dissertation proposal. Such a proposal is a research outline that delineates the doctoral thesis project, including the motivation for research question(s), the survey of the relevant theoretical and empirical contributions (building on the Literature Review), the development of a theoretical framework, the specification of the methodology and planned empirical analysis.

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.

Information on how to submit the dissertation proposal (8 ECTS) can be retrieved from the CDSS regulations section.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1st meeting
11.02.15
27.05.15
Wednesdays
10:15
11:45
D7, 27, 307


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, EAW, Literature Review, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback for second and third year CDSS PhD candidates in sociology on their ongoing dissertation project. In this workshop CDSS students are expected to play two roles. They should provide feedback to their peers as well as present their own work in order to receive feedback.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
11.02.15
20.05.15
Wednesdays
12:00
13:15
Parkring 47, 217

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide guidance and constructive feedback on writing academic papers in English. Each session will guide students through techniques for writing and/or revision of a paper or other similar document. Between sessions, students will apply techniques learnt to their own texts, receiving frequent feedback on their papers and tips on how to improve their writing. By the end of the course each participant will have improved at least one paper to a publishable standard and should be able to approach their next paper with greater confidence.

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
09.02.15
25.05.15
Monday
12:00
13:30
L9,7, 308


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 2

Course Content

Please refer to the MZES webpages for dates and times.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Colloquium
24.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesday
17:15
18:45
A5,6 room A 231


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: up to 12

Prerequisites

PhD students of the CDSS have privileged access to the GESIS Summer School in Survey Methodology. Course credit can be readily recognized. To obtain information about the summer school program and registration, please refer to the GESIS website.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
06.08.15
29.08.15
09:00
18:00
GESIS, Cologne


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

You should be familiar with the basics of regression models and maximum likelihood estimation. Ideally you also have attended the Bayes I course at the CDSS (but you will be able to follow if you have not). While I discuss models and algorithms in a general fashion, you will benefit a lot more from our computing exercises if you have at least a working familiarity with R. Good introductory resources are UCLA’s Stat Consulting Site and John Verzani’s free book SimpleR.


Course Content

This second part of the Bayesian workshop series introduces more advanced models. We will cover Bayesian versions of latent variable models, such as factor models and item response theory or ideal point models, as well as models for simultaneous outcomes, such as seemingly unrelated regression and multivariate probit models. Furthermore, we will discuss models to deal with the ubiquitous problem of missing data in a fully Bayesian context.

Each lecture is followed by lab sessions, where we replicate examples from the lecture and discuss how to understand fitted models through predictions and graphical displays.

Software:
We will use both R and JAGS for Bayesian computations. Please bring your laptop.

 

Full course outline


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
27.02.15
20.03.15
Fridays
09:30
16:30
L9,7, 308

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6+2

Course Content

Lecture "Longitudinal Data Analysis"

The lecture gives a broad overview of methods of longitudinal data analysis. The focus of the course lies on methods for panel and event history data analysis and their use in the social sciences. Attendance of the complementary course "Data Sources in Social Sciences" is highly recommended as the course illustrates the practical application of the methods in Stata and deepens understanding of the theoretical content of the lecture.

Lab Course "Data Sources in Social Sciences"

Using Stata we practice methods of event history and panel data analysis (especially first-difference-models, random/fixed effects-models, event history analysis) with examples from the German SOEP. Attendance of the complementary lecture " Longitudinal Data Analysis " is highly recommended as firm knowledge of the lecture content is presumed. In addition, a further prerequisite for participation is firm knowledge of data preparation and estimation of simple linear regressions using Stata. Participation in the lab session in not mandatory for meeting the overall course requirements. However, students should otherwise commit to deepening and applying the contents of the lecture of their own.

Suggested Readings:

  • Blossfeld, H.-P., K. Golsch, and G. Rohwer (2009): Event History Analysis with Stata. New York/ London: Psychology Press. [But avoid the philosophical part of the book on causality in chapter 1]
  • Andreß, H.J.,K. Golsch, and A. Schmidt (2013) Applied Panel Data Analysis for Economic and Social Surveys. Springer.

6 ECTS will be awarded for successful completion of an exam and an additional 2 ECTS can be awarded for participation in the lab course and handing of two practical assignments.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Lecture
10.02.15
19.05.15
Tuesdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B317
Tutorial
Lab Course
12.02.15
21.05.15
Thursdays
12:00
13:30
A5,6, C-108 (PC/Methods Lab)

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Knowledge of regression analysis


Course Content

Multilevel modeling is used when observations on the individual level are nested in units of one or more higher levels (e.g. students in classes in schools). The course will cover the logic of multilevel modeling, its statistical background, and implementation with Stata. Applications will come from international comparative research treating countries as the higher level units. Data from the International Social Survey Program and the PIONEUR project (on intra-European migration) serve as examples. However, students are also encouraged to bring their own data.

Course Readings:

  • Goldstein, H. (2010). Multilevel Statistical Models (Fourth Edition). London: Arnold.
  • Hox, J. (2010). Multilevel Analysis: Techniques and Applications. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Rabe-Hesketh, S. & Everitt, B. S. (2004). Handbook of Statistical Analyses Using Stata (Third Edition). Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall/ CRC Press.
  • Rabe-Hesketh, S. & Skrondal, A. (2008). Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata. 2nd Edition. College Station, TX: Stata Press.
  • Raudenbush, S. W. & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical Linear Models. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Skrondal, A. & Rabe-Hesketh, S. (2004). Generalized Latent Variable Modeling: Multilevel, Longitudinal, and Structural Equation Models. Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall/ CRC Press.
  • Snijders, T. A. B. & Bosker, R. J. (1999). Multilevel Analysis. An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Multilevel Modelling. London: Sage.
  • StataCorp. (2013). Stata Multilevel Mixed-Effects. Reference Manual. Release 13. College Station, TX: Stata Press.

Assessment type:  Home assignments/presentation


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
1st block
18.02.15
25.02.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
2nd block (bi-weekly)
11.03.15
25.03.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
3rd block (bi-weekly)
15.04.15
29.04.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
4th block
06.05.15
06.05.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Previously passed "Conducting survey methodological research" I or II (FSS2013 and HWS2014),  "The Essentials of survey design and data collection" (FSS2014), "Data and Measurement" (HWS2014) or a different equivalent course in Survey Methodology.


Course Content

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
L13,15, 519

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

Online panels, internet sampling and the use of Big Data for social science research have spurred a discussion on the need of probability sampling. In addition, traditional probability-based surveys with high non-response rates are challenged in their ability to create unbiased estimates. This seminar will review this debate and the statistical properties of alternative data collections. Possible solutions will also be discussed.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
Introduction
13.03.15
13.03.15
Friday
15:30
17:00
A5,6, C012
Block sessions
25.04.15
02.05.15
Saturdays
08:30
20:30
A5,6, B143


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich neben den Mitgliedern der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) auch an alle anderen Studierenden, Doktoranden und Nachwuchswissenschaftler in den Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme sind solide Kenntnisse in multivariaten Analyseverfahren und erste praktische Erfahrungen mit der Datenanalyse. Kenntnisse im Arbeiten mit dem SOEP werden nicht vorausgesetzt. In den Beispielen und Übungen im Rahmen des Workshops wird ausschließlich das Statistikprogrammpaket STATA verwendet.

Es wird eine Teilnahmegebühr verlangt. Diese beträgt 50 Euro (reduziert für Studierende 20 Euro).


Course Content

Das SOEP ist eine seit 1984 laufende jährliche Wiederholungsbefragung in Deutschland. Es ist eine der am längsten laufenden Panelstudien weltweit. Themenschwerpunkte sind unter anderem Haushaltszusammensetzung, Erwerbs- und Familienbiographie, Erwerbsbeteiligung und berufliche Mobilität, Einkommensverläufe, Gesundheit und Lebenszufriedenheit. Das Arbeiten mit einem komplexen Längsschnittdatensatz wie dem SOEP bietet viele Möglichkeiten, fordert aber auch spezielle Kenntnisse. Der Workshop bietet daher die Möglichkeit, einen fundierten Einblick in das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP zu erhalten. Grundsätzlich werden Kenntnisse in zwei Bereichen vermittelt. Zum einen wird ein Überblick über die Analysemöglichkeiten des SOEP gegeben und eine Einführung in die Datenaufbereitung gegeben. Zum anderen werden Analyseverfahren für Längsschnittdaten vorgestellt (Panelregression); einschließlich von Übungen auf Basis des SOEP. Zusammen bieten beide Teile eine Grundlage für eigene Forschungsarbeiten mit dem SOEP und ähnlichen Längsschnittdatensätzen.

Der Workshop wird von der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Längsschnittstudie "Sozio-oekonomisches Panel"/DIW Berlin veranstaltet. Lokaler Ausrichter ist der Lehrstuhl für Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung (Professor Dr. Thomas Gautschi). Für die Teilnahme an dem Kurs und das Erfüllen von Aufgaben im Anschluss können 3 ECTS vergeben werden.

Anmeldungen sind ab dem 18. März 2015 und bis zum 20. Mai 2015 möglich. Laden Sie dazu das Anmeldeformular herunter und senden Sie es ausgefüllt per E-Mail an SOEP(at)uni-mannheim.de. Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 35 begrenzt. Mit der Anmeldebestätigung erhalten sie eine Information, wie die Teilnahmegebühr zu entrichten ist.

Kursprogramm:

Montag 22.06.2014:
Der erste Tag bietet eine anwendungsorientierte Einführung in den Aufbau, die Inhalte und das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP. Im Rahmen des allgemeinen Überblicks wird auch auf aktuelle Innovationen im SOEP eingegangen. Neben einer Darstellung, wie die SOEP-Daten effizient aufbereitet werden können, sind im Rahmen der Übungen am Nachmittag auch Beratungen zu individuellen Fragestellungen vorgesehen. Weitergehende Einzelberatungen sind am Folgetag möglich. Leitung: Alexandra Fedorets & Knut Wenzig (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 9.45 Begrüßung
  • 10:00-11.15 Einführung in das SOEP
  • 11:15-11:30 Pause
  • 11:30-13:00 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Datenstruktur, SOEPinfo
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15:45 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Aufbereitung von Querschnitts- und Längsschnittsdatensätzen
  • 15:45-16:00 Pause
  • 16:00-18:00 Stichprobenziehung und Gewichtung im SOEP
  • 19:00 Gemeinsames Abendessen (fakultativ)

Dienstag 23.06.2014:
Am zweiten Tag werden grundlegende Regressionsmodelle für Paneldaten vorgestellt. Dieser Kursabschnitt richtet sich dabei ausdrücklich an Anfänger der Panelanalyse und setzt lediglich Vorwissen zu multivariaten Analyseverfahren voraus. Am Vormittag werden die Modelle erläutert. Am Nachmittag wird deren Anwendung anhand eines SOEP-Beispiels demonstriert. Danach besteht für TeilnehmerInnen, die ein eigenes Forschungsprojekt planen oder das SOEP bereits nutzen, die Möglichkeit spezifische Fragen individuell zu besprechen.
Leitung: Marco Giesselmann (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 10:30-13:00 Einführung in die Analyse von Paneldaten: Einfache Regression, Fixed Effects Regression
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15.15 Random Effects Regression
  • 15.15-15.30 Pause
  • 15.30-17.00 Hybride Regressionen

Mittwoch, 24. Juni 2014
Am dritten Tag wird mit Propensity Score Matching ein weiteres Analyseverfahren dargestellt. Neben einer allgemeinen Einführung werden auch Kombinationsmöglichkeiten mit Verfahren der Längsschnittanalyse (u.a. Difference-in-differences Matching) gezeigt. Wie am Vortag schließen sich praktische Übungen mit dem SOEP an eine theoretische Einführung an.
Leitung: Giuseppe Pietrantuono (Universität Mannheim)

  • 09:30-12:30: Propensity Score Matching
  • 12:30-14:00: Pause
  • 14:00-17:00: Propensity Score Matching

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Block
22.06.15
24.06.15
Monday to Wednesday
09:30
18:00
A5,6, C -108 (PC-Pool UG)

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 7

Course Content

Please refer to Prof. Bosnjak's course webdoc for details.

In a nutshell, meta-analysis can be described as a set of statistical methods for aggregating, summarizing, and drawing inferences from collections of thematically related studies. The key idea is to quantify the size, direction, and/or strength of an effect, and to cancel out sampling errors associated with individual studies.

Meta-analytic techniques have become the standard methods for aggregating the results from thematically related studies in the social and behavioral sciences. They can be used to describe a research field, to test and/or compare theories on a high level of abstraction, and to derive conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions.

The overall goal of this course is to provide a hands-on introduction into the different approaches belonging to the umbrella term ´meta-analysis´, to sketch their conceptual foundations, and to point participants to special issues and problems when evaluating and/or conducting meta-analytic studies. Moreover, each and every of the following topics addressed will be accompanied by exercises:

  • Definitions and processes: Systematic reviews and meta-analysis

  • What kind of scientific and applied research problems can be addressed with the aid of systematic reviews and meta-analysis?

  • Big picture: The systematic review/meta-analysis research cycle

  • Meta-analytic models: Hedges/Olkin (Homogeneity-based), Hunter/Schmidt (Psychometric)

  • Problem statement: Framing meta-analytic research questions

  • Systematically retrieving relevant primary studies: Literature research and selection

  • Extracting information from primary studies: Coding

  • Effect sizes: Basic types, estimation, conversion, and approximation strategies

  • Synthesizing the evidence: Mean effect size computation, moderator analysis techniques

  • Special issues: Dependent effect sizes, publication bias, study quality

  • Interpretation and reporting

  • Case studies and research critiques prepared by participants from various fields (tailored towards the academic backgrounds of the participants)

Office hours:

  • On appointment (can be held in person in L13,9, or via Skype)

Teaching material:

Recommended Textbooks:

  • Bornstein, M., Hedges, L.V., Higgins, J.P.T, & Rothstein, H.R. (2009). Introduction to Meta-Analysis. Chichester, UK: Wiley.
  • Card, N.A. (2011). Applied Meta-Analysis for the Social Sciences. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Cooper, H. (2010). Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: A Step-by-Step Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Cooper, H., Hedges, L.V., & Valentine, J.C. (Eds.) (2009). Handbook of Research Synthesis (2nd ed.). New York: Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (2004). Methods of meta-analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Lipsey, M.W., & Wilson, D.B. (2001). Practical Meta-analysis. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
04.02.15
20.05.15
Wednesday
17:15
20:30
A5,6, B317


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/POL

Credits: 6+2

Prerequisites

Knowledge of Multivariate Analysis


Course Content

This course serves  as an introduction to a multitude of probability models that are appropriate when the linear model is inadequate. After introducing the fundamentals from which statistical models are developed, this course will focus on one specific theory of inference, namely on the statistical theory of maximum likelihood. We will also devote considerable time to statistical programming, simulating and conveying quantities of material interest of such models (using R).

Course Readings:

  • Eliason, Scott R. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • King, Gary. 2008. Unifying political methodology: the likelihood theory of statistical inference. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Students who wish to pass this course must complete homework assignments and produce a research paper. Participation in the tutorial session (2 ECTS) is necessary for the assignments which complement the lecture (6 ECTS).


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
11.02.15
27.05.15
Wednesdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B143
Tutorial
12.02.15
28.05.15
Thursdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Intensive longitudinal studies (e.g., quantitative diary methods, experience-sampling methods) receive increasing attention within the social sciences. Although increasingly popular in psychology, but they offer also many options for researchers in sociology and the political sciencies. In essence, Intensive longitudinal methods allow for „capturing life as it is lived” (Bolger, Davis, Rafaeli, 2003, p. 579) and thereby they overcome retrospective bias and other limitations of other survey methods. Importantly, multiple assessments allow for modeling changes in affect, attitude, and behavior over time courses. 

In this course I will give an overview of the nature of intensive longitudinal methods, the research options they offer, as well as potential problems and challenges. I will discuss how to design empirical studies that use intensive longitudinal methods and will provide conceptual information about how to analyze the data (however, this course will not give an in-depth introduction in multi-level modeling).

Course Readings (a more comprehensive list will be available in the first meeting)

  • Bolger, N., Davis, A., & Rafaeli, E. (2003). Diary methods: Capturing life as it is lived. Annual Review of Psychology, 54, 579-616.
  • Bolger, N., & Laurenceau, J.-P. (2013). Intensive longitudinal methods: An introduction to diary and experience sampling research. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Mehl, M. R., & Conner, T. S. (Eds.). (2012). Handbook of research methods for studying daily life. New York, NY: Guildford Press.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
16.02.15
16.02.15
Monday
17:00
19:00
Schloss, M 218
02.03.15
02.03.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360
23.03.15
23.03.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360
04.05.15
04.05.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Dieses Seminar behandelt neben einigen statistischen Grundlagen der Meta-Analyse vor allem die praktische Seite dieser Forschungsmethode. Lernziele sind: der Umgang mit Effektstärken, meta-analytische Fragestellungen, Studienqualität, Einschluss- und Ausschlusskriterien, Kodieren, systematische Literatursuche, publication bias, statistische Auswertung mit grundlegenden Modellen (fixed effects, random effects, Meta-Regression), graphische Verfahren. Als Software wird mit R und entsprechenden R-Paketen für Meta-Analyse gearbeitet.

Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 28 Studierende begrenzt.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
15:30
17:00
EO 162


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

In diesem Seminar werden wichtige, in der Psychologie häufig angewendete Modellklassen vertieft behandelt. Dabei stehen verallgemeinerte lineare Modelle, Mehrebenenanalysen und Strukturgleichungsmodelle im Vordergrund. Neben der Behandlung der theoretischen Grundlagen werden empirische Anwendungen dieser Modelle vorgestellt sowie praktische Übungen zu deren Spezifikation in Programmen wie SPSS, R und Mplus durchgeführt.

Literatur:

  • Agresti, A. (2007). An introduction to categorical data analysis. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  • Raudenbusch, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models. Applications and data analysis methods. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Raykov, T., & Marcoulides, G. A. (2006). A first course in structural equation modeling. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Skrondal, A., & Rabe-Hesketh, S. (2004). Generalized latent variable modeling. Multilevel, longitudinal, and structural equation models. Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall.

Der Kurs findet in drei Parallelgruppen zu verschiedenen Terminen statt.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1. Parallellgruppe
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
13:45
15:15
EO 162
2. Parallelgruppe
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
15:30
17:00
EO 162
3. Parallelgruppe
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
10:15
11:45
EO 162 & EO 242

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/SOC

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Proficiency in German language is preferable.


Course Content

This course provides an introduction to formal models in the social sciences. It discusses a series of basic prototypes which have proved to be important tools for theory construction in various fields. Topics covered are, for example, individual choice, exchange, strategic action, collective action and the evolution of cooperation, diffusion, or segregation. While most of the models and examples chosen might already be fairly well known, this course puts specific emphasis on explaining the math behind them in more detail than usual. Thus, it will provide some expertise and training in general formal skills, such as maxmizing under constraints, game theory, difference equations, differential equations, Monte Carlo simulation, and agent-based simulation. The aim is to enable participants in principle to modify, extend or combine existing models according to their own research questions.

Accomplishing this course requires a paper (about 5.000 works) and a presentation (ca. 30 minutes).


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
13:45
15:15
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/MET

Credits: 3

Course Content

Course is part of the 2015 EITM Summer Institute, Mannheim Campus.

Course description

CDSS students are eligible to participate upon contacting the EITM Mannheim coordinator while registrations are ongoing.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
29.06.15
03.08.15
09:00
17:00

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/MET

Prerequisites

Some prior exposure to game theory is expected.

You can sign up for the course through the CDSS course catalogue or by sending an email to registration(at)gess.uni-mannheim.de.


Course Content

This joint SFB884/CDSS course is designed to help graduate students in political science make the transition from understanding basic game theoretical concepts and techniques to the application of these techniques in the study of international politics. The course will combine lectures reviewing specific techniques with published papers that apply these techniques. The topics will range from bargaining models of war to the effect of domestic politics on international conflict.

Songying Fang’s research focuses on how international institutions influence state behavior, using both game-theoretic and empirical analysis. She is particularly interested in domestic mechanisms that provide a link between international institutions and state foreign policy.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
16.06.15
17.06.15
Tuesday & Wednesday
10:00
16:30
L9,7, 308


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

  • Foundations of linear algebra and probability theory (high school level)
  • Computer skills that allow you to get familiar with complex applications fast

Course Content

The course presents methods for the computer assisted automatic analysis of digital documents as a basis for further quantitative content analyses used in social and cultural sciences.

In the beginning we will present some possible analyses computational linguistics can offer to social and cultural sciences using the software GATE. This is followed by a short programming course in the Python programming language introducing a more flexible way of preprocessing texts and also access to text data through web crawling and conversion of different file formats. More advanced methods on text classification and clustering are presented later on along with more tools that can be used. In the final part of the course participants will present their own project work to each other.

Passing the course is based on:

  • Implementation of a project
  • Final presentation
  • Report (~ 15 pages)
Reading recommendations

Application of NLP methods (NLTK)

Social Media Mining of the Icelandic Blogosphere

Application of NLP methods

Automated Discovery and Analysis of Social Networks from Threaded Discussions


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
17.04.15
24.04.15
Fridays
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab
08.05.15
08.05.15
Friday
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab
Presentations
29.05.15
29.05.15
Friday
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: SOC

Credits: 6

Course Content

This advanced seminar will explore recent social science research that seeks to explain variation in organizational behavior and development. We will consider a variety of research questions that tap into both formal and informal ways of organizing: what kinds of institutions are necessary to make economic organization work? Where do such institutions come from? Why do we observe very different outcomes across contexts even though they share the same market-supporting institutions? Why do some organizations survive even though they face the most unfavorable environments? How do conditions at the time of an organization's birth shape its development? To address these and further questions, we will rely both on recent theoretical advances and on empirical studies in a various settings.

Course reading:

Scott, W. Richard, and Gerald F. Davis. 2007. Organizations and Organizing: Rational, Natural, and Open Systems Perspectives. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
10:15
11:45
tbd.


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: SOC/MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

According to Durkheim, the comparative method is ”the” method of sociology. The seminar provides an introduction to comparative strategies and methods, particular those used in cross-national comparison of modern welfare states and market economies. In the seminar, the different quantitative and qualitative methods and strategies will be discussed. The seminar begins with an overview of the traditional approaches to historical and comparative sociology (Durkheim, Weber) and the differences in current research practice between variable- and case-oriented sociological analysis. Comparative welfare state analyses and the varieties of capitalism perspective use macro-comparative typologies to explain cross-national differences, using both qualitative and quantitative methods to explore cross-national differences. Qualitative comparative methods (QCA, fuzzy set) and time-related quantitative methods (time series, pooled time series, event history) will be discussed. The application of these methods and approaches will be illustrated by examples from comparative studies of welfare states and market economies.

Course readings:

  • Borchert, J / Lessenich, S. (Hrsg) 2012: Der Vergleich in den Sozialwissenschaften, Campus Reader, Frankfurt: Campus Verlag. (Zur Anschaffung empfohlen: 24,90 Euro)
  • Mahoney, J. / Rueschemeyer, D. (eds.) 2003: Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Rihoux, B., and Ragin, C. C. (eds.) (2009). Configurational Comparative Analysis. Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques. Los Angeles: Sage.
  • Janoski, T., and Hicks, A. M. (eds.) (1994). The Comparative Political Economy of the Welfare State. New York: Cambridge University.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
13:45
15:15
A5,6, B317


Course Type: core course

Course Number: DIS

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Dissertation Proposal Workshop 


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback for CDSS PhD candidates in political science on their ongoing dissertation project. In this workshop CDSS students are expected to play two roles. They should provide feedback to their peers as well as present their own work in order to receive feedback.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
11.02.15
28.05.15
Wednesdays
12:00
13:30
D7,27, 307

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: DIS

Credits: 2+8

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Literature Review

You should be prepared to address the following questions: What makes a particular research question an interesting question? Is it an important question? What contributions would this question and the answers make to the scholarly literature? What strategies are there to answer your research question(s)?


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback on writing students' dissertation proposal. Such a proposal is a research outline that delineates the doctoral thesis project, including the motivation for research question(s), the survey of the relevant theoretical and empirical contributions (building on the Literature Review), the development of a theoretical framework, the specification of the methodology and planned empirical analysis.

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.

Information on how to submit the dissertation proposal (8 ECTS) can be retrieved from the CDSS regulations section.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1st meeting
11.02.15
27.05.15
Wednesdays
10:15
11:45
D7, 27, 307

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide guidance and constructive feedback on writing academic papers in English. Each session will guide students through techniques for writing and/or revision of a paper or other similar document. Between sessions, students will apply techniques learnt to their own texts, receiving frequent feedback on their papers and tips on how to improve their writing. By the end of the course each participant will have improved at least one paper to a publishable standard and should be able to approach their next paper with greater confidence.

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
09.02.15
25.05.15
Monday
12:00
13:30
L9,7, 308


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 2

Course Content

Please refer to the MZES webpages for dates and times.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Colloquium
24.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesday
17:15
18:45
A5,6 room A 231


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

Attending the Seminar Series on the Political Economy of Reforms is a possible alternative to attending the MZES B colloquium. Please refer to the SFB 884 website for dates and times.



Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: up to 12

Prerequisites

PhD students of the CDSS have privileged access to the GESIS Summer School in Survey Methodology. Course credit can be readily recognized. To obtain information about the summer school program and registration, please refer to the GESIS website.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
06.08.15
29.08.15
09:00
18:00
GESIS, Cologne


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

You should be familiar with the basics of regression models and maximum likelihood estimation. Ideally you also have attended the Bayes I course at the CDSS (but you will be able to follow if you have not). While I discuss models and algorithms in a general fashion, you will benefit a lot more from our computing exercises if you have at least a working familiarity with R. Good introductory resources are UCLA’s Stat Consulting Site and John Verzani’s free book SimpleR.


Course Content

This second part of the Bayesian workshop series introduces more advanced models. We will cover Bayesian versions of latent variable models, such as factor models and item response theory or ideal point models, as well as models for simultaneous outcomes, such as seemingly unrelated regression and multivariate probit models. Furthermore, we will discuss models to deal with the ubiquitous problem of missing data in a fully Bayesian context.

Each lecture is followed by lab sessions, where we replicate examples from the lecture and discuss how to understand fitted models through predictions and graphical displays.

Software:
We will use both R and JAGS for Bayesian computations. Please bring your laptop.

 

Full course outline


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
27.02.15
20.03.15
Fridays
09:30
16:30
L9,7, 308

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6+2

Course Content

Lecture "Longitudinal Data Analysis"

The lecture gives a broad overview of methods of longitudinal data analysis. The focus of the course lies on methods for panel and event history data analysis and their use in the social sciences. Attendance of the complementary course "Data Sources in Social Sciences" is highly recommended as the course illustrates the practical application of the methods in Stata and deepens understanding of the theoretical content of the lecture.

Lab Course "Data Sources in Social Sciences"

Using Stata we practice methods of event history and panel data analysis (especially first-difference-models, random/fixed effects-models, event history analysis) with examples from the German SOEP. Attendance of the complementary lecture " Longitudinal Data Analysis " is highly recommended as firm knowledge of the lecture content is presumed. In addition, a further prerequisite for participation is firm knowledge of data preparation and estimation of simple linear regressions using Stata. Participation in the lab session in not mandatory for meeting the overall course requirements. However, students should otherwise commit to deepening and applying the contents of the lecture of their own.

Suggested Readings:

  • Blossfeld, H.-P., K. Golsch, and G. Rohwer (2009): Event History Analysis with Stata. New York/ London: Psychology Press. [But avoid the philosophical part of the book on causality in chapter 1]
  • Andreß, H.J.,K. Golsch, and A. Schmidt (2013) Applied Panel Data Analysis for Economic and Social Surveys. Springer.

6 ECTS will be awarded for successful completion of an exam and an additional 2 ECTS can be awarded for participation in the lab course and handing of two practical assignments.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Lecture
10.02.15
19.05.15
Tuesdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B317
Tutorial
Lab Course
12.02.15
21.05.15
Thursdays
12:00
13:30
A5,6, C-108 (PC/Methods Lab)

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Knowledge of regression analysis


Course Content

Multilevel modeling is used when observations on the individual level are nested in units of one or more higher levels (e.g. students in classes in schools). The course will cover the logic of multilevel modeling, its statistical background, and implementation with Stata. Applications will come from international comparative research treating countries as the higher level units. Data from the International Social Survey Program and the PIONEUR project (on intra-European migration) serve as examples. However, students are also encouraged to bring their own data.

Course Readings:

  • Goldstein, H. (2010). Multilevel Statistical Models (Fourth Edition). London: Arnold.
  • Hox, J. (2010). Multilevel Analysis: Techniques and Applications. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Rabe-Hesketh, S. & Everitt, B. S. (2004). Handbook of Statistical Analyses Using Stata (Third Edition). Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall/ CRC Press.
  • Rabe-Hesketh, S. & Skrondal, A. (2008). Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata. 2nd Edition. College Station, TX: Stata Press.
  • Raudenbush, S. W. & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical Linear Models. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Skrondal, A. & Rabe-Hesketh, S. (2004). Generalized Latent Variable Modeling: Multilevel, Longitudinal, and Structural Equation Models. Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall/ CRC Press.
  • Snijders, T. A. B. & Bosker, R. J. (1999). Multilevel Analysis. An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Multilevel Modelling. London: Sage.
  • StataCorp. (2013). Stata Multilevel Mixed-Effects. Reference Manual. Release 13. College Station, TX: Stata Press.

Assessment type:  Home assignments/presentation


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
1st block
18.02.15
25.02.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
2nd block (bi-weekly)
11.03.15
25.03.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
3rd block (bi-weekly)
15.04.15
29.04.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
4th block
06.05.15
06.05.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Previously passed "Conducting survey methodological research" I or II (FSS2013 and HWS2014),  "The Essentials of survey design and data collection" (FSS2014), "Data and Measurement" (HWS2014) or a different equivalent course in Survey Methodology.


Course Content

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
L13,15, 519

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

Online panels, internet sampling and the use of Big Data for social science research have spurred a discussion on the need of probability sampling. In addition, traditional probability-based surveys with high non-response rates are challenged in their ability to create unbiased estimates. This seminar will review this debate and the statistical properties of alternative data collections. Possible solutions will also be discussed.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
Introduction
13.03.15
13.03.15
Friday
15:30
17:00
A5,6, C012
Block sessions
25.04.15
02.05.15
Saturdays
08:30
20:30
A5,6, B143


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich neben den Mitgliedern der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) auch an alle anderen Studierenden, Doktoranden und Nachwuchswissenschaftler in den Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme sind solide Kenntnisse in multivariaten Analyseverfahren und erste praktische Erfahrungen mit der Datenanalyse. Kenntnisse im Arbeiten mit dem SOEP werden nicht vorausgesetzt. In den Beispielen und Übungen im Rahmen des Workshops wird ausschließlich das Statistikprogrammpaket STATA verwendet.

Es wird eine Teilnahmegebühr verlangt. Diese beträgt 50 Euro (reduziert für Studierende 20 Euro).


Course Content

Das SOEP ist eine seit 1984 laufende jährliche Wiederholungsbefragung in Deutschland. Es ist eine der am längsten laufenden Panelstudien weltweit. Themenschwerpunkte sind unter anderem Haushaltszusammensetzung, Erwerbs- und Familienbiographie, Erwerbsbeteiligung und berufliche Mobilität, Einkommensverläufe, Gesundheit und Lebenszufriedenheit. Das Arbeiten mit einem komplexen Längsschnittdatensatz wie dem SOEP bietet viele Möglichkeiten, fordert aber auch spezielle Kenntnisse. Der Workshop bietet daher die Möglichkeit, einen fundierten Einblick in das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP zu erhalten. Grundsätzlich werden Kenntnisse in zwei Bereichen vermittelt. Zum einen wird ein Überblick über die Analysemöglichkeiten des SOEP gegeben und eine Einführung in die Datenaufbereitung gegeben. Zum anderen werden Analyseverfahren für Längsschnittdaten vorgestellt (Panelregression); einschließlich von Übungen auf Basis des SOEP. Zusammen bieten beide Teile eine Grundlage für eigene Forschungsarbeiten mit dem SOEP und ähnlichen Längsschnittdatensätzen.

Der Workshop wird von der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Längsschnittstudie "Sozio-oekonomisches Panel"/DIW Berlin veranstaltet. Lokaler Ausrichter ist der Lehrstuhl für Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung (Professor Dr. Thomas Gautschi). Für die Teilnahme an dem Kurs und das Erfüllen von Aufgaben im Anschluss können 3 ECTS vergeben werden.

Anmeldungen sind ab dem 18. März 2015 und bis zum 20. Mai 2015 möglich. Laden Sie dazu das Anmeldeformular herunter und senden Sie es ausgefüllt per E-Mail an SOEP(at)uni-mannheim.de. Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 35 begrenzt. Mit der Anmeldebestätigung erhalten sie eine Information, wie die Teilnahmegebühr zu entrichten ist.

Kursprogramm:

Montag 22.06.2014:
Der erste Tag bietet eine anwendungsorientierte Einführung in den Aufbau, die Inhalte und das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP. Im Rahmen des allgemeinen Überblicks wird auch auf aktuelle Innovationen im SOEP eingegangen. Neben einer Darstellung, wie die SOEP-Daten effizient aufbereitet werden können, sind im Rahmen der Übungen am Nachmittag auch Beratungen zu individuellen Fragestellungen vorgesehen. Weitergehende Einzelberatungen sind am Folgetag möglich. Leitung: Alexandra Fedorets & Knut Wenzig (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 9.45 Begrüßung
  • 10:00-11.15 Einführung in das SOEP
  • 11:15-11:30 Pause
  • 11:30-13:00 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Datenstruktur, SOEPinfo
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15:45 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Aufbereitung von Querschnitts- und Längsschnittsdatensätzen
  • 15:45-16:00 Pause
  • 16:00-18:00 Stichprobenziehung und Gewichtung im SOEP
  • 19:00 Gemeinsames Abendessen (fakultativ)

Dienstag 23.06.2014:
Am zweiten Tag werden grundlegende Regressionsmodelle für Paneldaten vorgestellt. Dieser Kursabschnitt richtet sich dabei ausdrücklich an Anfänger der Panelanalyse und setzt lediglich Vorwissen zu multivariaten Analyseverfahren voraus. Am Vormittag werden die Modelle erläutert. Am Nachmittag wird deren Anwendung anhand eines SOEP-Beispiels demonstriert. Danach besteht für TeilnehmerInnen, die ein eigenes Forschungsprojekt planen oder das SOEP bereits nutzen, die Möglichkeit spezifische Fragen individuell zu besprechen.
Leitung: Marco Giesselmann (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 10:30-13:00 Einführung in die Analyse von Paneldaten: Einfache Regression, Fixed Effects Regression
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15.15 Random Effects Regression
  • 15.15-15.30 Pause
  • 15.30-17.00 Hybride Regressionen

Mittwoch, 24. Juni 2014
Am dritten Tag wird mit Propensity Score Matching ein weiteres Analyseverfahren dargestellt. Neben einer allgemeinen Einführung werden auch Kombinationsmöglichkeiten mit Verfahren der Längsschnittanalyse (u.a. Difference-in-differences Matching) gezeigt. Wie am Vortag schließen sich praktische Übungen mit dem SOEP an eine theoretische Einführung an.
Leitung: Giuseppe Pietrantuono (Universität Mannheim)

  • 09:30-12:30: Propensity Score Matching
  • 12:30-14:00: Pause
  • 14:00-17:00: Propensity Score Matching

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Block
22.06.15
24.06.15
Monday to Wednesday
09:30
18:00
A5,6, C -108 (PC-Pool UG)

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 7

Course Content

Please refer to Prof. Bosnjak's course webdoc for details.

In a nutshell, meta-analysis can be described as a set of statistical methods for aggregating, summarizing, and drawing inferences from collections of thematically related studies. The key idea is to quantify the size, direction, and/or strength of an effect, and to cancel out sampling errors associated with individual studies.

Meta-analytic techniques have become the standard methods for aggregating the results from thematically related studies in the social and behavioral sciences. They can be used to describe a research field, to test and/or compare theories on a high level of abstraction, and to derive conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions.

The overall goal of this course is to provide a hands-on introduction into the different approaches belonging to the umbrella term ´meta-analysis´, to sketch their conceptual foundations, and to point participants to special issues and problems when evaluating and/or conducting meta-analytic studies. Moreover, each and every of the following topics addressed will be accompanied by exercises:

  • Definitions and processes: Systematic reviews and meta-analysis

  • What kind of scientific and applied research problems can be addressed with the aid of systematic reviews and meta-analysis?

  • Big picture: The systematic review/meta-analysis research cycle

  • Meta-analytic models: Hedges/Olkin (Homogeneity-based), Hunter/Schmidt (Psychometric)

  • Problem statement: Framing meta-analytic research questions

  • Systematically retrieving relevant primary studies: Literature research and selection

  • Extracting information from primary studies: Coding

  • Effect sizes: Basic types, estimation, conversion, and approximation strategies

  • Synthesizing the evidence: Mean effect size computation, moderator analysis techniques

  • Special issues: Dependent effect sizes, publication bias, study quality

  • Interpretation and reporting

  • Case studies and research critiques prepared by participants from various fields (tailored towards the academic backgrounds of the participants)

Office hours:

  • On appointment (can be held in person in L13,9, or via Skype)

Teaching material:

Recommended Textbooks:

  • Bornstein, M., Hedges, L.V., Higgins, J.P.T, & Rothstein, H.R. (2009). Introduction to Meta-Analysis. Chichester, UK: Wiley.
  • Card, N.A. (2011). Applied Meta-Analysis for the Social Sciences. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Cooper, H. (2010). Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: A Step-by-Step Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Cooper, H., Hedges, L.V., & Valentine, J.C. (Eds.) (2009). Handbook of Research Synthesis (2nd ed.). New York: Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (2004). Methods of meta-analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Lipsey, M.W., & Wilson, D.B. (2001). Practical Meta-analysis. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
04.02.15
20.05.15
Wednesday
17:15
20:30
A5,6, B317


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/POL

Credits: 6+2

Prerequisites

Knowledge of Multivariate Analysis


Course Content

This course serves  as an introduction to a multitude of probability models that are appropriate when the linear model is inadequate. After introducing the fundamentals from which statistical models are developed, this course will focus on one specific theory of inference, namely on the statistical theory of maximum likelihood. We will also devote considerable time to statistical programming, simulating and conveying quantities of material interest of such models (using R).

Course Readings:

  • Eliason, Scott R. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • King, Gary. 2008. Unifying political methodology: the likelihood theory of statistical inference. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Students who wish to pass this course must complete homework assignments and produce a research paper. Participation in the tutorial session (2 ECTS) is necessary for the assignments which complement the lecture (6 ECTS).


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
11.02.15
27.05.15
Wednesdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B143
Tutorial
12.02.15
28.05.15
Thursdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Intensive longitudinal studies (e.g., quantitative diary methods, experience-sampling methods) receive increasing attention within the social sciences. Although increasingly popular in psychology, but they offer also many options for researchers in sociology and the political sciencies. In essence, Intensive longitudinal methods allow for „capturing life as it is lived” (Bolger, Davis, Rafaeli, 2003, p. 579) and thereby they overcome retrospective bias and other limitations of other survey methods. Importantly, multiple assessments allow for modeling changes in affect, attitude, and behavior over time courses. 

In this course I will give an overview of the nature of intensive longitudinal methods, the research options they offer, as well as potential problems and challenges. I will discuss how to design empirical studies that use intensive longitudinal methods and will provide conceptual information about how to analyze the data (however, this course will not give an in-depth introduction in multi-level modeling).

Course Readings (a more comprehensive list will be available in the first meeting)

  • Bolger, N., Davis, A., & Rafaeli, E. (2003). Diary methods: Capturing life as it is lived. Annual Review of Psychology, 54, 579-616.
  • Bolger, N., & Laurenceau, J.-P. (2013). Intensive longitudinal methods: An introduction to diary and experience sampling research. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Mehl, M. R., & Conner, T. S. (Eds.). (2012). Handbook of research methods for studying daily life. New York, NY: Guildford Press.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
16.02.15
16.02.15
Monday
17:00
19:00
Schloss, M 218
02.03.15
02.03.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360
23.03.15
23.03.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360
04.05.15
04.05.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Dieses Seminar behandelt neben einigen statistischen Grundlagen der Meta-Analyse vor allem die praktische Seite dieser Forschungsmethode. Lernziele sind: der Umgang mit Effektstärken, meta-analytische Fragestellungen, Studienqualität, Einschluss- und Ausschlusskriterien, Kodieren, systematische Literatursuche, publication bias, statistische Auswertung mit grundlegenden Modellen (fixed effects, random effects, Meta-Regression), graphische Verfahren. Als Software wird mit R und entsprechenden R-Paketen für Meta-Analyse gearbeitet.

Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 28 Studierende begrenzt.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
15:30
17:00
EO 162


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

In diesem Seminar werden wichtige, in der Psychologie häufig angewendete Modellklassen vertieft behandelt. Dabei stehen verallgemeinerte lineare Modelle, Mehrebenenanalysen und Strukturgleichungsmodelle im Vordergrund. Neben der Behandlung der theoretischen Grundlagen werden empirische Anwendungen dieser Modelle vorgestellt sowie praktische Übungen zu deren Spezifikation in Programmen wie SPSS, R und Mplus durchgeführt.

Literatur:

  • Agresti, A. (2007). An introduction to categorical data analysis. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  • Raudenbusch, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models. Applications and data analysis methods. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Raykov, T., & Marcoulides, G. A. (2006). A first course in structural equation modeling. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Skrondal, A., & Rabe-Hesketh, S. (2004). Generalized latent variable modeling. Multilevel, longitudinal, and structural equation models. Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall.

Der Kurs findet in drei Parallelgruppen zu verschiedenen Terminen statt.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1. Parallellgruppe
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
13:45
15:15
EO 162
2. Parallelgruppe
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
15:30
17:00
EO 162
3. Parallelgruppe
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
10:15
11:45
EO 162 & EO 242

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/SOC

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Proficiency in German language is preferable.


Course Content

This course provides an introduction to formal models in the social sciences. It discusses a series of basic prototypes which have proved to be important tools for theory construction in various fields. Topics covered are, for example, individual choice, exchange, strategic action, collective action and the evolution of cooperation, diffusion, or segregation. While most of the models and examples chosen might already be fairly well known, this course puts specific emphasis on explaining the math behind them in more detail than usual. Thus, it will provide some expertise and training in general formal skills, such as maxmizing under constraints, game theory, difference equations, differential equations, Monte Carlo simulation, and agent-based simulation. The aim is to enable participants in principle to modify, extend or combine existing models according to their own research questions.

Accomplishing this course requires a paper (about 5.000 works) and a presentation (ca. 30 minutes).


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
13:45
15:15
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 6

Course Content

This lecture gives an overview of central theoretical concepts and the main research findings in the field of Comparative Government, specifically focusing on the role of political institutions and their impact for political decision-making at all stages in the political process. The course introduces a number of core themes in the comparative study of political institutions, such as constitutions and their design as well as electoral institutions and their effects on turnout and voting behaviour. In addition, the lecture focuses on the impact of different institutional designs on patterns of party systems, party competition, government formation and coalition governance. In a third step, we discuss the effects of political institutions on various aspects of legislative decision-making and on the outcome of the political process.

Course Readings:

  • Benoit, Kenneth and Michael Laver (2006): Party Policy in Modern Democracies. London, New York: Routledge.
  • Clark, William Roberts, Matt Golder and Sona Nadenichek Golder (2012): Principles of Comparative Politics. Los Angeles: Sage. 
  • Gallagher, Michael, Michael Laver and Peter Mair (2011): Representative Government in Modern Europe. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Strøm, Kaare and Wolfgang C. Müller (eds; 2008): Cabinets and Coalition Bargaining: The Democratic Life Cycle in Western Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Tsebelis, George (2002): Veto Players. How Political Institutions Work. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
10:15
11:45
A5,6, B243


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 6

Course Content

The main aim of this lecture is to present an advanced introduction to and overview of the major theoretical approaches and substantial issues in comparative political sociology. The traditional focus of comparative political sociology – the recursive relationships between societal and political processes and institutions – changed rapidly in the last two decades. Important aspects of these changes are the weakening of the position of national states and the resolution of clear demarcations between state and society in many areas. The second aim of the lecture is to show the consequences of these developments for the processes of political change in European societies and politics. In comparative political sociology European politics have been examined mainly in terms of underlying ‘cleavages’ based on class, religion, ethnicity, and regional identity. Yet the relationships between cultural, structural, and political processes appear to change rapidly too.

Course readings:

  • Janoski, Thomas/Robert Alford/Alexander Hick/Mildred A. Schwartz (Hg.). 2005. The Handbook of Political Sociology. States, Civil Societies, and Globalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (Part I and Ch. 10, 11, 13, 18, 23).
  • Kriesi, Hanspeter/Edgar Grande/Martin Dolezal/Marc Helbling/Dominic Höglinger/Swen Hutter/Bruno Wüest. 2012. Political Conflict in Western Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (Part I and Part II).
  • van Deth, Jan W. 2011. "Political Sociology as a Field of Study." In: Bertrand Badie/Dirk Berg-Schlosser/Leonardo Morlino (Hg.). International Encyclopedia of Political Science, [vol. 6.] Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage: 2022-2039.

6 ECTS can be obtained for passing in the written exam at the end of the course (90 minutes).


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
10:15
11:45
A5,6, B317

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
23.04.15
24.04.15
Thursday & Friday
10:00
17:00
Parkring 47, 1st floor seminar room

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 6

Course Content

This is a graduate course on international political economy. The course assumes familiarity with the contents of the international relations and with economics. The twin goals of the course are to (a) introduce students to contemporary scholarly research on International Political Economy topics and (b) stimulate students to form original ideas for promising research projects in the area of international relations and political economy.
The course examines how domestic and international politics drive trade, investment, financial, and immigration policies and outcomes. It emphasizes the theoretical core, and some current debates, in the field but also aims to expose students to some nuts and bolts of each policy area and the chief methods by which scholars acquire knowledge of the subject. We pick up some knowledge of historical and contemporary examples wherever possible, but presenting historical material systematically is not the focus of the course.

Course dates:

Feb 20, Mar 6 & 27, Apr 10 & 30, May 8 & 22


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
irregular
20.02.15
22.05.15
Fridays
15:30
18:45
A5,6, B243
30.04.15
30.04.15
Thursday
17:15
20:30
A5,6, B243

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course introduces the students into the main topics of international politics, such as the analysis of international cooperation and international organizations, the theory of democratic peace, and the causes and consequences of civil and ethnic wars. The course is intended to be an interactive one.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
13:45
15:15
A5,6, B318

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 8

Course Content

Analysing intra-party conflict and its consequences for the political process has become a prominent research area in comparative political science. In this seminar, we will discuss institutional origins of intra-party conflict, its manifestation in the behaviour of parties and their representatives, and its consequences for government formation, the selection and de-selection of cabinet members and for the outcome of the legislative process. We will also discuss recent theoretical and methodological approaches in the analysis of party unity and its various consequences for patterns of (coalition) governance and decision-making of political actors. The overall goal of the seminar is that the participants formulate an innovative research question related to the topic of the course, which they answer on the basis of a theoretical approach and/or new empirical material.

Course readings:

  • Benoit, Kenneth and Laver, Michael (2006): Party Policy in Modern Democracies. London, New York: Routledge.
  • Carey, John M. (2009): Legislative Voting and Accountability. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  • Dowding, Keith and Patrick Dumont (eds., 2009): The Selection of Ministers in Europe: Hiring and Firing. Routledge: London.
  • Giannetti, Daniela and Kenneth Benoit (eds, 2009): Intra-Party Politics and Coalition Governments in Parliamentary Democracies. London: Routledge.
  • Laver, Michael and Kenneth A. Shepsle (1996): Making and Breaking Governments. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
12:00
13:30
A5,6, B318

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 8

Course Content

This is a graduate level course on game theory and its application to international relations. There are many recent papers published within IR that have used game theoretic techniques or analysis to at least some extent. It is important for a scholar that wishes to engage with this literature to have an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of this work. The main objective we will pursue is that graduates of the course will be able to engage with this large literature with confidence. Beyond this, the technical aspects of game theory in this course will be taught at a fairly high level, but the emphasis will placed on conceptual components as well as its use in applied settings. To a large extent, students may self select the degree of technicality at which they hope to understand the theoretical material.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
17:15
18:45
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Course requirements include:

  • Regular attendance and active class participation (10%)
  • Class presentation and leading the class discussion (30%)
  • Acting as a discussant for two research proposals of your fellow students (10%)
  • A research paper (50%)

Course Content

In this course, we will engage with contemporary research on the dynamics of civil war and post-war reconstruction. We will thus address questions such as: When does civil war break out? How are rebel groups formed and sustained and when do they use different forms of violence?  How can conflict be ended and which political, economic, social, and psychological challenges are post-war societies faced with? How for example can former combatants be disarmed and reintegrated into society and what are the consequences of child soldiering? Finally we will also examine whether peacebuilding, development aid and democratization really contribute to a lasting peace. The seminar will start with a theoretical part in which we look at the different theories concerning peace and conflict dynamics. The second part of the seminar we will then apply the before discussed theories to analyse different cases of civil war.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
12.12.15
28.05.15
Thursdays
12:00
13:30
B6, 23-25, A102

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 8

Course Content

This seminar intends to improve the writing and publication skills of participants in the field of international relations. In addition to proposing a research question, which contributes to the current literature, participants are requested to develop a research paper that fits in the publication style of a major scholarly journal. They are also free in their methodological choice, i.e. quantitative or case-oriented, formal or narrative etc. Accordingly, participants may select their own topic of choice in the field of international relations in preparation of the seminar. For the first session, they prepare a justification of their own topic selection with title, question, methodology, abstract and proposed literature. Subsequently, they select a journal of their choice and select the related literature to their research paper. Next, participants identify the journal’s publication style and finally adapt the writing of their research paper to this style. Until the presentation of the research papers, we will read the most prominent/classical articles in the field of international relations in order to discuss structure and style of writing.
 

Recommended Literature:

  • American Political Science Review
  • American Journal of Political Science
  • Journal of Politics
  • International Organization
  • World Politics
  • Journal of Conflict Resolution
  • European Union Politics

Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
15:30
17:00
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/MET

Credits: 3

Course Content

Course is part of the 2015 EITM Summer Institute, Mannheim Campus.

Course description

CDSS students are eligible to participate upon contacting the EITM Mannheim coordinator while registrations are ongoing.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
29.06.15
03.08.15
09:00
17:00

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/MET

Prerequisites

Some prior exposure to game theory is expected.

You can sign up for the course through the CDSS course catalogue or by sending an email to registration(at)gess.uni-mannheim.de.


Course Content

This joint SFB884/CDSS course is designed to help graduate students in political science make the transition from understanding basic game theoretical concepts and techniques to the application of these techniques in the study of international politics. The course will combine lectures reviewing specific techniques with published papers that apply these techniques. The topics will range from bargaining models of war to the effect of domestic politics on international conflict.

Songying Fang’s research focuses on how international institutions influence state behavior, using both game-theoretic and empirical analysis. She is particularly interested in domestic mechanisms that provide a link between international institutions and state foreign policy.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
16.06.15
17.06.15
Tuesday & Wednesday
10:00
16:30
L9,7, 308

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/PSY

Credits: 8

Course Content

The question of how citizens think about politics is central to the study of democracy. In his seminal article, Converse (1964) claimed that most citizens do not harbor full-fledged ideological belief systems. Accordingly, they rather think about politics in piecemeal terms. This claim has not gone without criticism. Rather, it has sparked an ongoing debate about how citizens make sense of politics. In this seminar, we will recap the scholarly debate. Students will review the latest empirical studies in the field and prepare research papers in which they analyze specific questions using available national and cross-national data sets.

Introductory Readings:

  • Converse, Philip E.1964. "The Nature of Belief Systems in Mass Publics". in: David E. Apter (ed.), Ideology and Discontent. New York: Free Press: 206-261.
  • Feldman, Stanley. 2013." Political Ideology". in: Huddy, Leonie/Sears, David O./Levy, Jack S. (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology. 2nd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 591-626.

Credit points can be obtained for a paper (8,000 words), the oral presentation of this paper, as well as active participation during the sessions.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
12:00
13:30
A5,6, B143


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

  • Foundations of linear algebra and probability theory (high school level)
  • Computer skills that allow you to get familiar with complex applications fast

Course Content

The course presents methods for the computer assisted automatic analysis of digital documents as a basis for further quantitative content analyses used in social and cultural sciences.

In the beginning we will present some possible analyses computational linguistics can offer to social and cultural sciences using the software GATE. This is followed by a short programming course in the Python programming language introducing a more flexible way of preprocessing texts and also access to text data through web crawling and conversion of different file formats. More advanced methods on text classification and clustering are presented later on along with more tools that can be used. In the final part of the course participants will present their own project work to each other.

Passing the course is based on:

  • Implementation of a project
  • Final presentation
  • Report (~ 15 pages)
Reading recommendations

Application of NLP methods (NLTK)

Social Media Mining of the Icelandic Blogosphere

Application of NLP methods

Automated Discovery and Analysis of Social Networks from Threaded Discussions


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
17.04.15
24.04.15
Fridays
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab
08.05.15
08.05.15
Friday
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab
Presentations
29.05.15
29.05.15
Friday
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: SOC/MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

According to Durkheim, the comparative method is ”the” method of sociology. The seminar provides an introduction to comparative strategies and methods, particular those used in cross-national comparison of modern welfare states and market economies. In the seminar, the different quantitative and qualitative methods and strategies will be discussed. The seminar begins with an overview of the traditional approaches to historical and comparative sociology (Durkheim, Weber) and the differences in current research practice between variable- and case-oriented sociological analysis. Comparative welfare state analyses and the varieties of capitalism perspective use macro-comparative typologies to explain cross-national differences, using both qualitative and quantitative methods to explore cross-national differences. Qualitative comparative methods (QCA, fuzzy set) and time-related quantitative methods (time series, pooled time series, event history) will be discussed. The application of these methods and approaches will be illustrated by examples from comparative studies of welfare states and market economies.

Course readings:

  • Borchert, J / Lessenich, S. (Hrsg) 2012: Der Vergleich in den Sozialwissenschaften, Campus Reader, Frankfurt: Campus Verlag. (Zur Anschaffung empfohlen: 24,90 Euro)
  • Mahoney, J. / Rueschemeyer, D. (eds.) 2003: Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Rihoux, B., and Ragin, C. C. (eds.) (2009). Configurational Comparative Analysis. Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques. Los Angeles: Sage.
  • Janoski, T., and Hicks, A. M. (eds.) (1994). The Comparative Political Economy of the Welfare State. New York: Cambridge University.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
13:45
15:15
A5,6, B317

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: DIS

Credits: 2+8

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Literature Review

You should be prepared to address the following questions: What makes a particular research question an interesting question? Is it an important question? What contributions would this question and the answers make to the scholarly literature? What strategies are there to answer your research question(s)?


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback on writing students' dissertation proposal. Such a proposal is a research outline that delineates the doctoral thesis project, including the motivation for research question(s), the survey of the relevant theoretical and empirical contributions (building on the Literature Review), the development of a theoretical framework, the specification of the methodology and planned empirical analysis.

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.

Information on how to submit the dissertation proposal (8 ECTS) can be retrieved from the CDSS regulations section.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1st meeting
11.02.15
27.05.15
Wednesdays
10:15
11:45
D7, 27, 307


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

Research projects in cognitive psychology and neuropsychology are planned, conducted, analyzed, and discussed.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Dissertation Workshop
09.02.15
18.05.15
Monday
15:30
17:00
EO 259


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

TBCI, CSSR, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

In this seminar we will discuss current issues in Social Cognition. Participants will be required to read current journal articles and to present and discuss them in class. Building either on a literature review or on a linkage to ongoing research projects at the University of Mannheim, participants will be asked to develop own research ideas. These research ideas will be presented in class and will provide a basis for in-class discussions.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Dissertation Workshop
09.02.15
18.05.15
Monday
13:45
15:15
A5,6 room B 318

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide guidance and constructive feedback on writing academic papers in English. Each session will guide students through techniques for writing and/or revision of a paper or other similar document. Between sessions, students will apply techniques learnt to their own texts, receiving frequent feedback on their papers and tips on how to improve their writing. By the end of the course each participant will have improved at least one paper to a publishable standard and should be able to approach their next paper with greater confidence.

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
09.02.15
25.05.15
Monday
12:00
13:30
L9,7, 308


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

TCBI, CSSR, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

Please check with individual chairs in the Psychology department for dates and times of research colloquia.



Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: up to 12

Prerequisites

PhD students of the CDSS have privileged access to the GESIS Summer School in Survey Methodology. Course credit can be readily recognized. To obtain information about the summer school program and registration, please refer to the GESIS website.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
06.08.15
29.08.15
09:00
18:00
GESIS, Cologne


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

You should be familiar with the basics of regression models and maximum likelihood estimation. Ideally you also have attended the Bayes I course at the CDSS (but you will be able to follow if you have not). While I discuss models and algorithms in a general fashion, you will benefit a lot more from our computing exercises if you have at least a working familiarity with R. Good introductory resources are UCLA’s Stat Consulting Site and John Verzani’s free book SimpleR.


Course Content

This second part of the Bayesian workshop series introduces more advanced models. We will cover Bayesian versions of latent variable models, such as factor models and item response theory or ideal point models, as well as models for simultaneous outcomes, such as seemingly unrelated regression and multivariate probit models. Furthermore, we will discuss models to deal with the ubiquitous problem of missing data in a fully Bayesian context.

Each lecture is followed by lab sessions, where we replicate examples from the lecture and discuss how to understand fitted models through predictions and graphical displays.

Software:
We will use both R and JAGS for Bayesian computations. Please bring your laptop.

 

Full course outline


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
27.02.15
20.03.15
Fridays
09:30
16:30
L9,7, 308

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6+2

Course Content

Lecture "Longitudinal Data Analysis"

The lecture gives a broad overview of methods of longitudinal data analysis. The focus of the course lies on methods for panel and event history data analysis and their use in the social sciences. Attendance of the complementary course "Data Sources in Social Sciences" is highly recommended as the course illustrates the practical application of the methods in Stata and deepens understanding of the theoretical content of the lecture.

Lab Course "Data Sources in Social Sciences"

Using Stata we practice methods of event history and panel data analysis (especially first-difference-models, random/fixed effects-models, event history analysis) with examples from the German SOEP. Attendance of the complementary lecture " Longitudinal Data Analysis " is highly recommended as firm knowledge of the lecture content is presumed. In addition, a further prerequisite for participation is firm knowledge of data preparation and estimation of simple linear regressions using Stata. Participation in the lab session in not mandatory for meeting the overall course requirements. However, students should otherwise commit to deepening and applying the contents of the lecture of their own.

Suggested Readings:

  • Blossfeld, H.-P., K. Golsch, and G. Rohwer (2009): Event History Analysis with Stata. New York/ London: Psychology Press. [But avoid the philosophical part of the book on causality in chapter 1]
  • Andreß, H.J.,K. Golsch, and A. Schmidt (2013) Applied Panel Data Analysis for Economic and Social Surveys. Springer.

6 ECTS will be awarded for successful completion of an exam and an additional 2 ECTS can be awarded for participation in the lab course and handing of two practical assignments.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Lecture
10.02.15
19.05.15
Tuesdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B317
Tutorial
Lab Course
12.02.15
21.05.15
Thursdays
12:00
13:30
A5,6, C-108 (PC/Methods Lab)

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Knowledge of regression analysis


Course Content

Multilevel modeling is used when observations on the individual level are nested in units of one or more higher levels (e.g. students in classes in schools). The course will cover the logic of multilevel modeling, its statistical background, and implementation with Stata. Applications will come from international comparative research treating countries as the higher level units. Data from the International Social Survey Program and the PIONEUR project (on intra-European migration) serve as examples. However, students are also encouraged to bring their own data.

Course Readings:

  • Goldstein, H. (2010). Multilevel Statistical Models (Fourth Edition). London: Arnold.
  • Hox, J. (2010). Multilevel Analysis: Techniques and Applications. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Rabe-Hesketh, S. & Everitt, B. S. (2004). Handbook of Statistical Analyses Using Stata (Third Edition). Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall/ CRC Press.
  • Rabe-Hesketh, S. & Skrondal, A. (2008). Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata. 2nd Edition. College Station, TX: Stata Press.
  • Raudenbush, S. W. & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical Linear Models. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Skrondal, A. & Rabe-Hesketh, S. (2004). Generalized Latent Variable Modeling: Multilevel, Longitudinal, and Structural Equation Models. Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall/ CRC Press.
  • Snijders, T. A. B. & Bosker, R. J. (1999). Multilevel Analysis. An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Multilevel Modelling. London: Sage.
  • StataCorp. (2013). Stata Multilevel Mixed-Effects. Reference Manual. Release 13. College Station, TX: Stata Press.

Assessment type:  Home assignments/presentation


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
1st block
18.02.15
25.02.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
2nd block (bi-weekly)
11.03.15
25.03.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
3rd block (bi-weekly)
15.04.15
29.04.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244
4th block
06.05.15
06.05.15
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
A5,6, B244

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Previously passed "Conducting survey methodological research" I or II (FSS2013 and HWS2014),  "The Essentials of survey design and data collection" (FSS2014), "Data and Measurement" (HWS2014) or a different equivalent course in Survey Methodology.


Course Content

Session dates and locations may be subject to change upon agreement with the lecturer in the first session.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
L13,15, 519

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

Online panels, internet sampling and the use of Big Data for social science research have spurred a discussion on the need of probability sampling. In addition, traditional probability-based surveys with high non-response rates are challenged in their ability to create unbiased estimates. This seminar will review this debate and the statistical properties of alternative data collections. Possible solutions will also be discussed.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
Introduction
13.03.15
13.03.15
Friday
15:30
17:00
A5,6, C012
Block sessions
25.04.15
02.05.15
Saturdays
08:30
20:30
A5,6, B143


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich neben den Mitgliedern der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) auch an alle anderen Studierenden, Doktoranden und Nachwuchswissenschaftler in den Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme sind solide Kenntnisse in multivariaten Analyseverfahren und erste praktische Erfahrungen mit der Datenanalyse. Kenntnisse im Arbeiten mit dem SOEP werden nicht vorausgesetzt. In den Beispielen und Übungen im Rahmen des Workshops wird ausschließlich das Statistikprogrammpaket STATA verwendet.

Es wird eine Teilnahmegebühr verlangt. Diese beträgt 50 Euro (reduziert für Studierende 20 Euro).


Course Content

Das SOEP ist eine seit 1984 laufende jährliche Wiederholungsbefragung in Deutschland. Es ist eine der am längsten laufenden Panelstudien weltweit. Themenschwerpunkte sind unter anderem Haushaltszusammensetzung, Erwerbs- und Familienbiographie, Erwerbsbeteiligung und berufliche Mobilität, Einkommensverläufe, Gesundheit und Lebenszufriedenheit. Das Arbeiten mit einem komplexen Längsschnittdatensatz wie dem SOEP bietet viele Möglichkeiten, fordert aber auch spezielle Kenntnisse. Der Workshop bietet daher die Möglichkeit, einen fundierten Einblick in das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP zu erhalten. Grundsätzlich werden Kenntnisse in zwei Bereichen vermittelt. Zum einen wird ein Überblick über die Analysemöglichkeiten des SOEP gegeben und eine Einführung in die Datenaufbereitung gegeben. Zum anderen werden Analyseverfahren für Längsschnittdaten vorgestellt (Panelregression); einschließlich von Übungen auf Basis des SOEP. Zusammen bieten beide Teile eine Grundlage für eigene Forschungsarbeiten mit dem SOEP und ähnlichen Längsschnittdatensätzen.

Der Workshop wird von der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Längsschnittstudie "Sozio-oekonomisches Panel"/DIW Berlin veranstaltet. Lokaler Ausrichter ist der Lehrstuhl für Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung (Professor Dr. Thomas Gautschi). Für die Teilnahme an dem Kurs und das Erfüllen von Aufgaben im Anschluss können 3 ECTS vergeben werden.

Anmeldungen sind ab dem 18. März 2015 und bis zum 20. Mai 2015 möglich. Laden Sie dazu das Anmeldeformular herunter und senden Sie es ausgefüllt per E-Mail an SOEP(at)uni-mannheim.de. Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 35 begrenzt. Mit der Anmeldebestätigung erhalten sie eine Information, wie die Teilnahmegebühr zu entrichten ist.

Kursprogramm:

Montag 22.06.2014:
Der erste Tag bietet eine anwendungsorientierte Einführung in den Aufbau, die Inhalte und das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP. Im Rahmen des allgemeinen Überblicks wird auch auf aktuelle Innovationen im SOEP eingegangen. Neben einer Darstellung, wie die SOEP-Daten effizient aufbereitet werden können, sind im Rahmen der Übungen am Nachmittag auch Beratungen zu individuellen Fragestellungen vorgesehen. Weitergehende Einzelberatungen sind am Folgetag möglich. Leitung: Alexandra Fedorets & Knut Wenzig (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 9.45 Begrüßung
  • 10:00-11.15 Einführung in das SOEP
  • 11:15-11:30 Pause
  • 11:30-13:00 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Datenstruktur, SOEPinfo
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15:45 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Aufbereitung von Querschnitts- und Längsschnittsdatensätzen
  • 15:45-16:00 Pause
  • 16:00-18:00 Stichprobenziehung und Gewichtung im SOEP
  • 19:00 Gemeinsames Abendessen (fakultativ)

Dienstag 23.06.2014:
Am zweiten Tag werden grundlegende Regressionsmodelle für Paneldaten vorgestellt. Dieser Kursabschnitt richtet sich dabei ausdrücklich an Anfänger der Panelanalyse und setzt lediglich Vorwissen zu multivariaten Analyseverfahren voraus. Am Vormittag werden die Modelle erläutert. Am Nachmittag wird deren Anwendung anhand eines SOEP-Beispiels demonstriert. Danach besteht für TeilnehmerInnen, die ein eigenes Forschungsprojekt planen oder das SOEP bereits nutzen, die Möglichkeit spezifische Fragen individuell zu besprechen.
Leitung: Marco Giesselmann (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 10:30-13:00 Einführung in die Analyse von Paneldaten: Einfache Regression, Fixed Effects Regression
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15.15 Random Effects Regression
  • 15.15-15.30 Pause
  • 15.30-17.00 Hybride Regressionen

Mittwoch, 24. Juni 2014
Am dritten Tag wird mit Propensity Score Matching ein weiteres Analyseverfahren dargestellt. Neben einer allgemeinen Einführung werden auch Kombinationsmöglichkeiten mit Verfahren der Längsschnittanalyse (u.a. Difference-in-differences Matching) gezeigt. Wie am Vortag schließen sich praktische Übungen mit dem SOEP an eine theoretische Einführung an.
Leitung: Giuseppe Pietrantuono (Universität Mannheim)

  • 09:30-12:30: Propensity Score Matching
  • 12:30-14:00: Pause
  • 14:00-17:00: Propensity Score Matching

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Block
22.06.15
24.06.15
Monday to Wednesday
09:30
18:00
A5,6, C -108 (PC-Pool UG)

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 7

Course Content

Please refer to Prof. Bosnjak's course webdoc for details.

In a nutshell, meta-analysis can be described as a set of statistical methods for aggregating, summarizing, and drawing inferences from collections of thematically related studies. The key idea is to quantify the size, direction, and/or strength of an effect, and to cancel out sampling errors associated with individual studies.

Meta-analytic techniques have become the standard methods for aggregating the results from thematically related studies in the social and behavioral sciences. They can be used to describe a research field, to test and/or compare theories on a high level of abstraction, and to derive conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions.

The overall goal of this course is to provide a hands-on introduction into the different approaches belonging to the umbrella term ´meta-analysis´, to sketch their conceptual foundations, and to point participants to special issues and problems when evaluating and/or conducting meta-analytic studies. Moreover, each and every of the following topics addressed will be accompanied by exercises:

  • Definitions and processes: Systematic reviews and meta-analysis

  • What kind of scientific and applied research problems can be addressed with the aid of systematic reviews and meta-analysis?

  • Big picture: The systematic review/meta-analysis research cycle

  • Meta-analytic models: Hedges/Olkin (Homogeneity-based), Hunter/Schmidt (Psychometric)

  • Problem statement: Framing meta-analytic research questions

  • Systematically retrieving relevant primary studies: Literature research and selection

  • Extracting information from primary studies: Coding

  • Effect sizes: Basic types, estimation, conversion, and approximation strategies

  • Synthesizing the evidence: Mean effect size computation, moderator analysis techniques

  • Special issues: Dependent effect sizes, publication bias, study quality

  • Interpretation and reporting

  • Case studies and research critiques prepared by participants from various fields (tailored towards the academic backgrounds of the participants)

Office hours:

  • On appointment (can be held in person in L13,9, or via Skype)

Teaching material:

Recommended Textbooks:

  • Bornstein, M., Hedges, L.V., Higgins, J.P.T, & Rothstein, H.R. (2009). Introduction to Meta-Analysis. Chichester, UK: Wiley.
  • Card, N.A. (2011). Applied Meta-Analysis for the Social Sciences. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Cooper, H. (2010). Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: A Step-by-Step Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Cooper, H., Hedges, L.V., & Valentine, J.C. (Eds.) (2009). Handbook of Research Synthesis (2nd ed.). New York: Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (2004). Methods of meta-analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Lipsey, M.W., & Wilson, D.B. (2001). Practical Meta-analysis. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
04.02.15
20.05.15
Wednesday
17:15
20:30
A5,6, B317


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/POL

Credits: 6+2

Prerequisites

Knowledge of Multivariate Analysis


Course Content

This course serves  as an introduction to a multitude of probability models that are appropriate when the linear model is inadequate. After introducing the fundamentals from which statistical models are developed, this course will focus on one specific theory of inference, namely on the statistical theory of maximum likelihood. We will also devote considerable time to statistical programming, simulating and conveying quantities of material interest of such models (using R).

Course Readings:

  • Eliason, Scott R. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • King, Gary. 2008. Unifying political methodology: the likelihood theory of statistical inference. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Students who wish to pass this course must complete homework assignments and produce a research paper. Participation in the tutorial session (2 ECTS) is necessary for the assignments which complement the lecture (6 ECTS).


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
11.02.15
27.05.15
Wednesdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B143
Tutorial
12.02.15
28.05.15
Thursdays
08:30
10:00
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Intensive longitudinal studies (e.g., quantitative diary methods, experience-sampling methods) receive increasing attention within the social sciences. Although increasingly popular in psychology, but they offer also many options for researchers in sociology and the political sciencies. In essence, Intensive longitudinal methods allow for „capturing life as it is lived” (Bolger, Davis, Rafaeli, 2003, p. 579) and thereby they overcome retrospective bias and other limitations of other survey methods. Importantly, multiple assessments allow for modeling changes in affect, attitude, and behavior over time courses. 

In this course I will give an overview of the nature of intensive longitudinal methods, the research options they offer, as well as potential problems and challenges. I will discuss how to design empirical studies that use intensive longitudinal methods and will provide conceptual information about how to analyze the data (however, this course will not give an in-depth introduction in multi-level modeling).

Course Readings (a more comprehensive list will be available in the first meeting)

  • Bolger, N., Davis, A., & Rafaeli, E. (2003). Diary methods: Capturing life as it is lived. Annual Review of Psychology, 54, 579-616.
  • Bolger, N., & Laurenceau, J.-P. (2013). Intensive longitudinal methods: An introduction to diary and experience sampling research. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Mehl, M. R., & Conner, T. S. (Eds.). (2012). Handbook of research methods for studying daily life. New York, NY: Guildford Press.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
16.02.15
16.02.15
Monday
17:00
19:00
Schloss, M 218
02.03.15
02.03.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360
23.03.15
23.03.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360
04.05.15
04.05.15
Monday
10:00
17:00
Schloss, EO 360

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Dieses Seminar behandelt neben einigen statistischen Grundlagen der Meta-Analyse vor allem die praktische Seite dieser Forschungsmethode. Lernziele sind: der Umgang mit Effektstärken, meta-analytische Fragestellungen, Studienqualität, Einschluss- und Ausschlusskriterien, Kodieren, systematische Literatursuche, publication bias, statistische Auswertung mit grundlegenden Modellen (fixed effects, random effects, Meta-Regression), graphische Verfahren. Als Software wird mit R und entsprechenden R-Paketen für Meta-Analyse gearbeitet.

Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 28 Studierende begrenzt.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
15:30
17:00
EO 162


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

In diesem Seminar werden wichtige, in der Psychologie häufig angewendete Modellklassen vertieft behandelt. Dabei stehen verallgemeinerte lineare Modelle, Mehrebenenanalysen und Strukturgleichungsmodelle im Vordergrund. Neben der Behandlung der theoretischen Grundlagen werden empirische Anwendungen dieser Modelle vorgestellt sowie praktische Übungen zu deren Spezifikation in Programmen wie SPSS, R und Mplus durchgeführt.

Literatur:

  • Agresti, A. (2007). An introduction to categorical data analysis. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  • Raudenbusch, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models. Applications and data analysis methods. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Raykov, T., & Marcoulides, G. A. (2006). A first course in structural equation modeling. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Skrondal, A., & Rabe-Hesketh, S. (2004). Generalized latent variable modeling. Multilevel, longitudinal, and structural equation models. Boca Raton, FL: Chapman & Hall.

Der Kurs findet in drei Parallelgruppen zu verschiedenen Terminen statt.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1. Parallellgruppe
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
13:45
15:15
EO 162
2. Parallelgruppe
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
15:30
17:00
EO 162
3. Parallelgruppe
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
10:15
11:45
EO 162 & EO 242

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/SOC

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Proficiency in German language is preferable.


Course Content

This course provides an introduction to formal models in the social sciences. It discusses a series of basic prototypes which have proved to be important tools for theory construction in various fields. Topics covered are, for example, individual choice, exchange, strategic action, collective action and the evolution of cooperation, diffusion, or segregation. While most of the models and examples chosen might already be fairly well known, this course puts specific emphasis on explaining the math behind them in more detail than usual. Thus, it will provide some expertise and training in general formal skills, such as maxmizing under constraints, game theory, difference equations, differential equations, Monte Carlo simulation, and agent-based simulation. The aim is to enable participants in principle to modify, extend or combine existing models according to their own research questions.

Accomplishing this course requires a paper (about 5.000 works) and a presentation (ca. 30 minutes).


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
13:45
15:15
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/MET

Credits: 3

Course Content

Course is part of the 2015 EITM Summer Institute, Mannheim Campus.

Course description

CDSS students are eligible to participate upon contacting the EITM Mannheim coordinator while registrations are ongoing.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
29.06.15
03.08.15
09:00
17:00

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/MET

Prerequisites

Some prior exposure to game theory is expected.

You can sign up for the course through the CDSS course catalogue or by sending an email to registration(at)gess.uni-mannheim.de.


Course Content

This joint SFB884/CDSS course is designed to help graduate students in political science make the transition from understanding basic game theoretical concepts and techniques to the application of these techniques in the study of international politics. The course will combine lectures reviewing specific techniques with published papers that apply these techniques. The topics will range from bargaining models of war to the effect of domestic politics on international conflict.

Songying Fang’s research focuses on how international institutions influence state behavior, using both game-theoretic and empirical analysis. She is particularly interested in domestic mechanisms that provide a link between international institutions and state foreign policy.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
16.06.15
17.06.15
Tuesday & Wednesday
10:00
16:30
L9,7, 308

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/PSY

Credits: 8

Course Content

The question of how citizens think about politics is central to the study of democracy. In his seminal article, Converse (1964) claimed that most citizens do not harbor full-fledged ideological belief systems. Accordingly, they rather think about politics in piecemeal terms. This claim has not gone without criticism. Rather, it has sparked an ongoing debate about how citizens make sense of politics. In this seminar, we will recap the scholarly debate. Students will review the latest empirical studies in the field and prepare research papers in which they analyze specific questions using available national and cross-national data sets.

Introductory Readings:

  • Converse, Philip E.1964. "The Nature of Belief Systems in Mass Publics". in: David E. Apter (ed.), Ideology and Discontent. New York: Free Press: 206-261.
  • Feldman, Stanley. 2013." Political Ideology". in: Huddy, Leonie/Sears, David O./Levy, Jack S. (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology. 2nd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 591-626.

Credit points can be obtained for a paper (8,000 words), the oral presentation of this paper, as well as active participation during the sessions.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
26.05.15
Tuesdays
12:00
13:30
A5,6, B143

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: PSY

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

This seminar is targeted at doctoral students and post-docs in Psychology.


Course Content

Students will present planned and on-going research (ideas, designs, results) and discuss it with the participants. In some sessions, papers on theoretical or methodological perspectives will be discussed. Some sessions can be dedicated to discussing participants' own drafts and get feedback before submission. The seminar also provides the opportunity to get feedback on practicing conference presentations/job talks etc. Topics may cover all areas of social psychology and consumer psychology.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
10.02.15
19.05.15
Tuesdays
09:30
11:00
Parkring 47, room 324


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

  • Foundations of linear algebra and probability theory (high school level)
  • Computer skills that allow you to get familiar with complex applications fast

Course Content

The course presents methods for the computer assisted automatic analysis of digital documents as a basis for further quantitative content analyses used in social and cultural sciences.

In the beginning we will present some possible analyses computational linguistics can offer to social and cultural sciences using the software GATE. This is followed by a short programming course in the Python programming language introducing a more flexible way of preprocessing texts and also access to text data through web crawling and conversion of different file formats. More advanced methods on text classification and clustering are presented later on along with more tools that can be used. In the final part of the course participants will present their own project work to each other.

Passing the course is based on:

  • Implementation of a project
  • Final presentation
  • Report (~ 15 pages)
Reading recommendations

Application of NLP methods (NLTK)

Social Media Mining of the Icelandic Blogosphere

Application of NLP methods

Automated Discovery and Analysis of Social Networks from Threaded Discussions


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
17.04.15
24.04.15
Fridays
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab
08.05.15
08.05.15
Friday
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab
Presentations
29.05.15
29.05.15
Friday
09:00
14:00
A5,6, C-108 PC-Lab


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: SOC/MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

According to Durkheim, the comparative method is ”the” method of sociology. The seminar provides an introduction to comparative strategies and methods, particular those used in cross-national comparison of modern welfare states and market economies. In the seminar, the different quantitative and qualitative methods and strategies will be discussed. The seminar begins with an overview of the traditional approaches to historical and comparative sociology (Durkheim, Weber) and the differences in current research practice between variable- and case-oriented sociological analysis. Comparative welfare state analyses and the varieties of capitalism perspective use macro-comparative typologies to explain cross-national differences, using both qualitative and quantitative methods to explore cross-national differences. Qualitative comparative methods (QCA, fuzzy set) and time-related quantitative methods (time series, pooled time series, event history) will be discussed. The application of these methods and approaches will be illustrated by examples from comparative studies of welfare states and market economies.

Course readings:

  • Borchert, J / Lessenich, S. (Hrsg) 2012: Der Vergleich in den Sozialwissenschaften, Campus Reader, Frankfurt: Campus Verlag. (Zur Anschaffung empfohlen: 24,90 Euro)
  • Mahoney, J. / Rueschemeyer, D. (eds.) 2003: Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Rihoux, B., and Ragin, C. C. (eds.) (2009). Configurational Comparative Analysis. Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques. Los Angeles: Sage.
  • Janoski, T., and Hicks, A. M. (eds.) (1994). The Comparative Political Economy of the Welfare State. New York: Cambridge University.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
09.02.15
18.05.15
Mondays
13:45
15:15
A5,6, B317

Register

Social Sciences Spring 2015

Dissertation Tutorial: Sociology (Gautschi/Hillmann/Kreuter)
Dissertation Tutorial: Sociology (Kogan/Kalter/Ebbinghaus)
DIS
Dissertation Proposal Workshop
RES
CDSS Workshop: Sociology
RES
English Academic Writing
RES
MZES A Colloquium "European Societies and their Integration"
MET
4th GESIS Summer School in Survey Methodology
MET
Bayesian Statistics for Social Scientists II: Advanced Bayesian Models
MET
Longitudinal Data Analysis (Lecture + Lab Course)
MET
Multilevel Modeling
MET
Recent Findings from Survey Methodological Research
MET
Sampling: The current probability/non-probability debate
MET
SOEPcampus - Längsschnittdatenanalyse mit dem Sozio-oekonomischen Panel
MET
Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis
MET/POL
Advanced Quantitative Methods
MET/PSY
Intensive Longitudinal Methods
MET/PSY
Praxis der Meta-Analyse mit R
MET/PSY
Spezielle Forschungs- und Evaluationsmethoden
MET/SOC
Modellierung sozialer Prozesse
POL/MET
Advanced Course: Political Economy Experiments
POL/MET
Game-theoretic Models of International Conflict
RES
Computer-based Content Analysis (Bridge Course)
SOC
Economy & the Welfare State: Organizational Sociology
SOC/MET
Economy & the Welfare State: Comparative Methods qualitative and quantitative
DIS
CDSS Workshop: Political Science
RES
MZES B Colloquium "European Political Systems and their Integration"
RES
SFB 884 Seminar Series
POL
Comparative Government
POL
Comparative Political Sociology: European Societies and Politics
POL
Deliberation and Voting Behavior: Experimental Evidence from the Philippines
POL
International Political Economy
POL
International Politics
POL
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Intra-party politics and political decision-making
POL
Selected Topics in International Politics: Advanced Game Theory for IR Students
POL
Selected Topics in International Politics: Civil War Dynamics and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding
POL
Selected Topics in International Politics: International Politics and International Publications
POL/PSY
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Innocent of Ideology? Political Belief Systems in Comparative Perspective
RES
CDSS Workshop: Research in Cognitive Psychology
RES
CDSS Workshop: Research in Social Cognition
RES
SC3/WC3 Colloquia II
PSY
Advanced Social and Economic Cognition