BE INSPIRED

"The CDSB core courses and especially the electives are very useful because they equip us with solid skills in our field of research as well as in related fields." Kirstin Becker, CDSB

Course Catalog

Fall 2013


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC/TAX910

Credits: 6

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
04.09.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
17:15
18:45
O251/52


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC/TAX911

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course aims at students in accounting and taxation. The course is taught in a seminar-style format. Students present their own research and discuss the presentations of other students. Students are introduced in writing referee reports to (drafts of) papers. Allocation of topics will be determined in class.


Competences acquired

Students will learn how to present and discuss their own research results. They will become acquainted with acting as discussant for other topics. Additionally, they will learn how to write a referee report.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
04.09.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
O251/52


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC801

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course is designed to guide doctoral students in the usage of methods and tools in empirical research in accounting and finance, and bring them quickly to the level at which they can "technically" implement empirical research. Selected topics include:

  • Typical steps in emp. projects
  • Alternative data sources
  • Databases in Accounting & Finance
  • Programming (SAS, STATA)
  • The publication process
  • Discussion of replication projects

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
08.11.13
22.11.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
SO133


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC901

Course Content

This course is designed to be a primer on paradigms of advanced research in accounting. Its aim is to make the students familiar with the relevant state-of-the-art research methodologies in accounting. Therefore, a broad range of heterogeneous approaches will be covered that employ analytical, empirical, normative and experimental research methodologies and reflect the diversity of accounting research. Each approach will be illustrated with a discussion of currently explored research questions.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
04.09.13
04.09.13
Wednesday
17:15
20:30
O251
09.09.13
09.09.13
Monday
17:15
20:30
O251
10.09.13
10.09.13
Tuesday
17:15
20:30
O251
12.09.13
12.09.13
Thursday
17:15
20:30
O251
16.09.13
16.09.13
Monday
17:15
20:30
O251


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E703

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

E700

The course is intended for Masters and first year PhD students with prior knowledge of undergraduate level econometrics. Working knowledge of basic probability theory, differential calculus, linear algebra and matrix algebra are assumed. Students should check if they are sufficiently familiar with these topics. A refresher course in statistics is offered from 10:00 to 18:45 on the following dates: 06.09. (SO 133), 13.09. (O 129), 20.09. (O 129), 27.09. (O 129). 


Course Content

The course is designed to offer an advanced treatment to econometric theory and applications. Topics covered include: Repetition of ordinary least squares and generalized least squares, instrumental variables estimation, simultaneous equations, generalized method of moments and maximum likelihood estimation, time series and panel data econometrics. Attendance in the lectures and exercise sessions are mandatory. Attempting exercise questions ahead of each session and taking active part during the course of the sessions is essential. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
01.10.13
03.12.13
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
SO133
02.10.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
SO133
Tutorial
Exercise
10.10.13
05.12.13
Thursday
13:45
15:15
O135
Stata Tutorial
10.10.13
05.12.13
Thursday
12:00
13:30
L7, 3-5, 257

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Content

This course aims to provide a working knowledge of basic probability theory and inductive statistics. The course is especially recommended for students wanting to refresh the skills required to attend the course Advanced Econometrics I (E703). The topics roughly align with appendices B, C, and D of the book Econometric Analysis by William H. Greene (2008, 6th ed.), for example: random variables, expectations, probability distributions, random sampling, point estimators, confidence intervals,, hypothesis testing, large sample distribution theory.

 

Further information

Background reading material:

  • Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.
  • Introduction to Econometrics by Stock and Watson (2007, 2nd ed.), chapters 2 and 3.
  • Introduction to Probability Models by Ross (2000, 2nd ed.), chapters 2.1-2.5, 2.7, and 3.1-3.4

Please note that the Statistics Refresher course will cover integrals and most of the basic statistics you’ll need in Advanced Econometrics I. These topics won’t be covered again in Advanced Econometrics I. Hence you are advised to attend the Statistics Refresher course, if you have some doubts about your knowledge regarding the above mentioned topics. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.13
06.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
SO133
13.09.13
13.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
20.09.13
20.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
27.09.13
27.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: ACC&TAX916

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

The course is intended for PhD students with some prior knowledge of undergraduate level econometrics and statistics. A refresher course in statistics is offered from 10 o’clock to 18 o’clock on following dates: 06.09. (SO 133), 13.09. (O 129), 20.09. (O 129). 


Course Content

The course enables students to apply the econometric methods which are commonly used in economic research. Special attention is given to the interpretation of empirical results and understanding the potential caveats of different approaches. Topics covered include: Ordinary least squares, instrumental variables estimation, and panel data econometrics. Further topics may also be included according to demand by participants. Attendance in the lectures and exercise sessions are mandatory. Attempting exercise questions ahead of each session and taking active part during the course of the sessions is essential.

 

Textbook:

Stock, J. H. and M. Watson, Introduction to Econometrics, 3rd ed., Amsterdam: Addison-Wesley Longman, 2011.

 

Complementary textbooks:

Angrist, J.D. and J.-S. Pischke, Mostly Harmless Econometrics, Princeton: Princeton Press, 2009.

 

Other reading materials:

Hayashi, F., Econometrics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.

Verbeek, M., A Guide to Modern Econometrics. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2008.

Hamilton, J. D., Time Series Analysis. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994.

Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. 7th ed., Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2011.

Wooldridge, J., Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd ed. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2010. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
03.09.13
03.12.13
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
O326/28
04.09.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
08:30
10:00
L9, 7, 257

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: ACC911

Credits: 8

Course Content

The course shall

  • (1) enable you to critically evaluate experimental research;
  • (2) inform you about current topics in experimental research in accounting and corporate governance;
  • (3) equip you with the tools to conduct experimental research on your own. The first part covers the experimental methodology.

It starts with a motivating session on current topics in accounting and corporate governance (session 1). Then, the following methodological topics are covered: ensuring experimental validity (session 2); choice of the experimental approach (session 3); selected topics in experimental design (session 4);  selected topics in statistical analysis (session 5).
The second part covers in detail current research in accounting and corporate governance fields. This shall inform you about current research and shall train you in critically discussing experimental research. The structure of the second part is generally focuses on fundamental questions of accounting and corporate governance, but can be adjusted to the research interests of the participants by including tax, finance or management accounting topics.

The fundamental questions are:

  • (RQ1)“How do incentives shape the provision of information?”;
  • (RQ2) “How do information influences relevant economic decisions?”;
  • (RQ3) “How do individual information processing affect market-level phenomena?”;
  • (RQ4) “How do strategic interactions between relevant actors influences outcomes?”.

We will discuss both behavioral research and experimental economics research. The third part shall help you to develop the skills to design your own experiments. In a workshop style, we will discuss how a potential experimental design could look like for potential research questions of your field of interest.


Competences acquired

All participants of the course are expected to read the mandatory reading. The first part on experimental design is lecture-based, but also includes interactive discussions of case studies. The second part on current experimental research involves interactive discussions of representative papers with one of the participants leading the discussion. The third part will feature workshop style presentations on how a research question of your field of interest could be implemented in an experiment.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
18.10.13
18.10.13
Friday
09:00
18:00
L9, 7, 308
25.10.13
25.10.13
Friday
09:00
18:00
L9, 7, 308
08.11.13
08.11.13
Friday
09:00
18:00
L9, 7, 308


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E700

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Basic mathematical knowledge.


Course Content

The course consists of four chapters:

  • Chapter 1: basic mathematical concepts like sets, functions and relations are introduced and discussed. Strict mathematical reasoning is explained and applied.
  • Chapter 2: covers the concept of metric and normed spaces and discusses the convergence of sequences in these spaces, the continuity of functions, and the concept of compact sets.
  • Chapter 3: deal with vector spaces. matrix algebra, linear transformation, and eigenvalues of matrices.
  • Chapter 4: covers a multivariate concept of differentiability and its application in solving unconstrained and constrained optimization problems.

 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

Written exam: 120 min.


Literature

Recommended textbook: de la Fuente, A. (2000). Mathematical Methods and Models for Economists. Cambridge University Press.


Competences acquired

The students know basic mathematical concepts of analysis and linear algebra. They can interpret mathematical formulas that are written in the condensed mathematical syntax. The students understand the concept of a proof and can develop rigorous mathematical proofs in a elementary level. They understand abstract mathematical concepts like metric spaces and linear spaces and are able to comprehend argumentation on basis of abstract mathematical concepts. They are able to apply their knowoledge; especially they are familiar with the calculation of limits and derivatives, the methods of linear algebra, and they can solve nonlinear optimization problems. The students are able to communicate their mathematical knowledge in English.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
02.09.13
23.09.13
Monday
10:15
11:45
A5, 6, B243
03.09.13
24.09.13
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
L7, 3-5, 001
04.09.13
25.09.13
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
L7, 3-5, S031
05.09.13
26.09.13
Thursday
10:15
11:45
L7, 3-5, S031
Tutorial
Exercise
02.09.13
23.09.13
Monday
13:45
15:15
L7, 3-5, P044
Exercise (CDSB only)
02.09.13
23.09.13
Monday
13:45
15:15
L7, 3-5, P043
Exercise
02.09.13
23.09.13
Monday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 002
Exercise
02.09.13
23.09.13
Monday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 003
Exercise
03.09.13
24.09.13
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
L9, 1-2, 002
Exercise (CDSB only)
03.09.13
24.09.13
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
L9, 1-2, 003
Exercise
03.09.13
24.09.13
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 002
Exercise
03.09.13
24.09.13
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 003
Exercise (CDSB only)
04.09.13
25.09.13
Wednesday
13:45
15:15
L9, 1-2, 003
Exercise
04.09.13
25.09.13
Wednesday
13:45
15:15
L9, 1-2, 002
Exercise
04.09.13
25.09.13
Wednesday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 002
Exercise
04.09.13
25.09.13
Wednesday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 003
Exercise (CDSB only)
05.09.13
26.09.13
Thursday
13:45
15:15
L9, 1-2, 003
Exercise
05.09.13
26.09.13
Thursday
13:45
15:15
L7, 3-5, P043
Exercise
05.09.13
26.09.13
Thursday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 002
Exercise
15.06.16
17.12.13
Thursday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 003


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E703

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

E700

The course is intended for Masters and first year PhD students with prior knowledge of undergraduate level econometrics. Working knowledge of basic probability theory, differential calculus, linear algebra and matrix algebra are assumed. Students should check if they are sufficiently familiar with these topics. A refresher course in statistics is offered from 10:00 to 18:45 on the following dates: 06.09. (SO 133), 13.09. (O 129), 20.09. (O 129), 27.09. (O 129). 


Course Content

The course is designed to offer an advanced treatment to econometric theory and applications. Topics covered include: Repetition of ordinary least squares and generalized least squares, instrumental variables estimation, simultaneous equations, generalized method of moments and maximum likelihood estimation, time series and panel data econometrics. Attendance in the lectures and exercise sessions are mandatory. Attempting exercise questions ahead of each session and taking active part during the course of the sessions is essential. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
01.10.13
03.12.13
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
SO133
02.10.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
SO133
Tutorial
Exercise
10.10.13
05.12.13
Thursday
13:45
15:15
O135
Stata Tutorial
10.10.13
05.12.13
Thursday
12:00
13:30
L7, 3-5, 257

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN801

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Mathematics for Economists (E700)


Course Content

The aim of this course is to provide Ph.D. students with the foundations of financial economics in a rigorous way. The course covers utility theory, discusses portfolio theory and capital market equilibrium (CAPM and APT). We will then discuss consumption-based asset pricing models. While doing so we will introduce concepts such as risk-neutral valuation and the stochastic discount factor (pricing kernel). In the last chapter we will discuss asset pricing under differential information.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
18.10.13
18.10.13
Friday
09:00
17:30
L5, 2, 107
25.10.13
25.10.13
Friday
09:00
17:30
L5, 2, 107
08.11.13
08.11.13
Friday
09:00
17:30
L5, 2, 107
15.11.13
15.11.13
Friday
09:00
17:30
L5, 2, 107
Q+A problem set
22.11.13
22.11.13
Friday
09:00
17:30
L5, 2, 107
Exam
29.11.13
29.11.13
Friday
14:00
16:00
L5, 2, 107
presentation of papers
19.12.13
19.12.13
Thursday
09:30
17:30
L5, 2, 107


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN910

Credits: 6

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
02.09.13
02.12.13
Monday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2, 001

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Content

This course aims to provide a working knowledge of basic probability theory and inductive statistics. The course is especially recommended for students wanting to refresh the skills required to attend the course Advanced Econometrics I (E703). The topics roughly align with appendices B, C, and D of the book Econometric Analysis by William H. Greene (2008, 6th ed.), for example: random variables, expectations, probability distributions, random sampling, point estimators, confidence intervals,, hypothesis testing, large sample distribution theory.

 

Further information

Background reading material:

  • Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.
  • Introduction to Econometrics by Stock and Watson (2007, 2nd ed.), chapters 2 and 3.
  • Introduction to Probability Models by Ross (2000, 2nd ed.), chapters 2.1-2.5, 2.7, and 3.1-3.4

Please note that the Statistics Refresher course will cover integrals and most of the basic statistics you’ll need in Advanced Econometrics I. These topics won’t be covered again in Advanced Econometrics I. Hence you are advised to attend the Statistics Refresher course, if you have some doubts about your knowledge regarding the above mentioned topics. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.13
06.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
SO133
13.09.13
13.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
20.09.13
20.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
27.09.13
27.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129


Course Type: core course

Course Number: IS801

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

The course is offered as part of the Center for Doctoral Studies in Business (CDSB) at the Graduate School of Economics and Social Sciences (GESS). The course can only be attended by PhD students of the Business School at the University of Mannheim. Furthermore, MMM students participating in the Y-Model are also eligible to attend the course. The number of course participants is at minimum 4 and at maximum 8 PhD students. 


Course Content

Since the 90's information and communication technology (ICT) has fundamentally changed the way organizations are conducting business. Organizations and the entire society are challenged with the effective design, delivery, use, and impact of ICT. The IS discipline addresses this challenge and investigates the phenomena that emerge when the technological and the social system interact (Lee, 2001). A decade ago an intensive discussion on the relevancy and impact of IS research has started (Benbasat and Zmud, 1999; Davenport and Markus 1999; Applegate and King, 1999; Gill and Bhattacherjee, 2009). In this context, several scholars (e.g., Orlikowski and Iacono, 2001) have suggested that the IS community returns to an exploration of the "IT" that underlies the discipline. Design research has potentials to address the above mentioned challenge (Gregor, 2009, Purao et al., 2008). Design research as such is nothing new; it can be found in many disciplines and fields, notably Engineering and Computer Science, using a variety of approaches, methods, and techniques.

This course intends to provide a comprehensive overview on design science in IS research from different perspectives: basic definitions, principles and theoretical foundations, frameworks and methodologies, theory building, as well as design science research examples. PhD students are introduced to the exciting field of design science research and learn basics guidelines to carry out design-oriented research projects. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-off
13.09.13
13.09.13
Friday
08:30
10:00
L15, 1-6, 411/12
18.10.13
18.10.13
Friday
08:30
13:30
L15, 1-6, 411/12
15.11.13
15.11.13
Friday
08:30
13:30
L15, 1-6, 411/12


Course Type: core course

Course Number: IS901

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course provides the foundation for PhD level work especially in the information systems (IS) field, but for other fields as well (such as Operations Management). The course is particularly helpful in preparing students for understanding the basic philosophical assumptions they either implicitly or explicitly make when they do research. The course is largely theoretical; designed to provide a perspective on the current research literature so that students learn how to identify different research orientations and build an informed opinion on critical research issues which will help them in developing their dissertations. The primary focus of the course is on the current research programs in IS and the philosophical assumptions which underlie them. We’ll also look at underlying philosophical assumptions adopted in the the Ops Mgt area. The course will explore the various schools of thought which exist, analyzing their special sets of assumptions which distinguish one from another. The most important assumptions relate to the nature of the world around us (ontology), and how to acquire knowledge about it (epistemology). Different research epistemologies can be characterized by the ideal of knowledge to which each of them adheres, and the particular preferred approaches for obtaining knowledge. As not all epistemologies are equally well represented in actual research programs, orthodox and "emerging" research programs will be explored. The course will also consider how other Management Studies disciplines deal with the same fundamental issues faced by IS researchers (e.g. what is truth, what is knowledge). Assignment of topics will be conducted by the lecturer.


Course literature

  • Burrell, G. and G. Morgan (1979): Sociological Paradigms and Organizational Analysis, Heinemann (especially chapters 1-3, 8, 11).
  • Kuhn, T. (1970): The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, University of Chicago Press, 2nd ed.
  • Popper, K., (1963): Conjectures & Refutations, Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  • Berger, P. and T. Luckmann (1967): The Social Construction of Reality, Penguin Books.
  • Burke, J. (1982): Worlds Without End, video and article

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
02.10.13
02.10.13
Wednesday
08:30
11:45
L15, 1-6, 714/15
07.10.13
07.10.13
Monday
08:30
13:30
L15, 1-6, 714/15
09.10.13
09.10.13
Wednesday
08:30
11:45
L15, 1-6, 714/15
14.10.13
14.10.13
Monday
08:30
13:30
L15, 1-6, 714/15
15.10.13
15.10.13
Tuesday
13:30
17:00
L15, 1-6, 714/15


Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM/IS910

Credits: 6

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
04.09.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
O048/50

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Content

This course aims to provide a working knowledge of basic probability theory and inductive statistics. The course is especially recommended for students wanting to refresh the skills required to attend the course Advanced Econometrics I (E703). The topics roughly align with appendices B, C, and D of the book Econometric Analysis by William H. Greene (2008, 6th ed.), for example: random variables, expectations, probability distributions, random sampling, point estimators, confidence intervals,, hypothesis testing, large sample distribution theory.

 

Further information

Background reading material:

  • Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.
  • Introduction to Econometrics by Stock and Watson (2007, 2nd ed.), chapters 2 and 3.
  • Introduction to Probability Models by Ross (2000, 2nd ed.), chapters 2.1-2.5, 2.7, and 3.1-3.4

Please note that the Statistics Refresher course will cover integrals and most of the basic statistics you’ll need in Advanced Econometrics I. These topics won’t be covered again in Advanced Econometrics I. Hence you are advised to attend the Statistics Refresher course, if you have some doubts about your knowledge regarding the above mentioned topics. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.13
06.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
SO133
13.09.13
13.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
20.09.13
20.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
27.09.13
27.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: IS914

Credits: 8

Course Content

This workshop will focus on the concepts and applications of grounded theory (GT). As a workshop the emphasis will be on student ability to perform the tasks leading to successful GT investigation. The educational model is loosely based on experiential learning that centers around a sequence of stating hypotheses or expectations, testing these through some experience or activity, discussing and interpreting resulting observations, then reflecting and forming increasingly sophisticated understandings.

Students will have the opportunity to develop an overview understanding of GT through directed readings and discussion, planning and execution of related tasks, receipt of feedback and opportunities for correction and improvement on initial efforts, and reflection on each task/activity.

It is expected that students will read one of three main books on this topic and at least 5 of the example articles to be chosen according to the topical interest of each student.

 

The course content will address the formal Glaser and Straus formulation of grounded theory but acknowledge variations that have evolved over the years. The seminar will be organized in a workshop format. The workshop will involve hands on application through development of a sample protocol, individual conduct of interviewing relevant subjects, transcription, coding, and data analysis. This exercise should reflect all of the relevant steps necessary for the conduct of a full scale GT project. Because the focus will be on the semantic and meaningful comments of subject/participants, supporting software will be discussed but not emphasized.

Students can do all the work needed using Microsoft Word tables and will be shown ways to do this quickly and efficiently. Microsoft Excel would serve as an equally viable resource. The purpose of this seminar is to not only bring awareness of the methods of GT to participants but also to provide an introductory level skill base for future research activity as well as competence and understanding for evaluation and review of the GT work of other scholars.

It is expected that the production of a genuine research level paper will be one result of this course. With the guidance of the instructor, it is anticipated that the collective results of project structuring, data gathering, and systematic coding analysis, the core of a publishable paper will be created. As a result, students will experience genuine research activity from conception through execution, rather than observe a simulation. Should the level of production rise to that sufficient for publication students will have an opportunity to reflect upon the outcome of such work as well as the steps involved. In the eventuality that the effort falls short of producing publishable results, students will be able to reflect upon the degree of effort needed for publication, analyze gaps between performance needed and experienced and gain valuable lessons regarding the real world of research production.

 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

 

Grading will be based on two essays written by each student and submitted at the end of the course. These essays will be comprised of the following:

1)a short reading summary of one of three books (students may select any of the three –Glaser and Strauss 1967, Locke 2000, or Charmaz 2006). This first essay will address three questions in approximately 2 double spaced pages each (there is no firm upper limit to length of answers, but the stated length is intended as a general expectation or guideline): What existing issues in IS would be appropriate for grounded theory and why? Under what conditions would you foresee excellent research conducted that does not follow all indicated GT steps and procedures? What weaknesses, even given a general positive view of GT, do you see in how the author presents this approach and what might remediate these?

This essay will account for 30% of the grade in the course.

2)the second essay will be presented at the end of class and will be expected to be approximately 10 double spaced pages. In this essay, each student will describe the major steps during the semester that they personally took in regard to the GT activity. This will include participation in group events such as brainstorming the interview protocol, lining up an interview, conducting the interview, transcribing the interview, and individual coding. The description should include statements about what actions were taken but also what observations and conclusions the student draws from these. The paper should also contrast their own actions with what was described as the procedure in one of the five articles they have read. It is expected that their own experience will be more detailed than what was described in the paper. Finally, the essay should include their personal observations regarding the key difficulties and opportunities in using GT, how they might apply it in a study in a topic of interest in the IS domain, and how where GT as a method might be enhanced.

This essay will account for 70% of the grade in the course including 35% for the essay itself and 35% for completing the action items of the course such as individual interview, transcription, and first level of coding. 

 

 

Further information

For any further information please visit the following website: eris.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/en/education/fall_2013/phd/grounded_theory_in_practice_is_914/ 

Prior to the start of the program, students will be asked to read one of the three books listed below. Those who end up working with grounded theory in doctoral theses or for publication will eventually need to be familiar with all three of these.

  • Glaser, B. G. and Strauss, A. (1967). The Discovery of Grounded Theory: Strategies of Qualitative Research (271 pages). Although this is the longest book it is the most fundamental to GT research and is advocated for those who are likely to pursue GT research in their own studies knowing that they will over time have to enhance their reading with additional sources on this method.
  • Locke, K. (2000). Grounded Theory in Management Research (SAGE Series in Management Research) (160 pages) This is both the shortest book and the one most oriented toward business research. It tends to be pragmatic, but some reviewers want every detail to align with the original conceptualization.
  • Charmaz, K (2006). Constructing Grounded Theory: A Practical Guide Through Qualitative Analysis (224 pages) 

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
01.10.13
12.11.13
Tuesday
09:00
12:15
L15, 1-6, 411/12


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN802

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Content of MAN610 or MAN672


Course Content

The course aims to provide the basic understanding of the institutions belonging to the Nonprofit Sector. Furthermore the course addresses the relevant economic and managerial theories in order to be able to analyze the specific managerial problems of Nonprofit Organizations (NPOs). Each student will be asked to work himself through a basic scientific ('classical') paper, enrich this paper by adding latest research results from currently published journal papers, and present the findings in class, where the results will be discussed. Topics that will be touched include 'History and Scope of the Nonprofit Sector', 'Nonprofits and the Marketplace', 'Nonprofits and the Polity', 'Key Activities in the Nonprofit Sector', and 'Mission and Governance'. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-off
11.09.13
11.09.13
Wednesday
15:30
17:30
L 5, 4, 207/09
Q&A-session, optional
16.10.13
16.10.13
Wednesday
14:00
15:30
L 5, 4, 207/09
presentation session
19.11.13
19.11.13
Tuesday
09:00
12:00
L 5, 4, 207/09
presentation session
19.11.13
19.11.13
Tuesday
13:30
17:00
L 5, 4, 207/09


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN910

Credits: 6

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Content

This course aims to provide a working knowledge of basic probability theory and inductive statistics. The course is especially recommended for students wanting to refresh the skills required to attend the course Advanced Econometrics I (E703). The topics roughly align with appendices B, C, and D of the book Econometric Analysis by William H. Greene (2008, 6th ed.), for example: random variables, expectations, probability distributions, random sampling, point estimators, confidence intervals,, hypothesis testing, large sample distribution theory.

 

Further information

Background reading material:

  • Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.
  • Introduction to Econometrics by Stock and Watson (2007, 2nd ed.), chapters 2 and 3.
  • Introduction to Probability Models by Ross (2000, 2nd ed.), chapters 2.1-2.5, 2.7, and 3.1-3.4

Please note that the Statistics Refresher course will cover integrals and most of the basic statistics you’ll need in Advanced Econometrics I. These topics won’t be covered again in Advanced Econometrics I. Hence you are advised to attend the Statistics Refresher course, if you have some doubts about your knowledge regarding the above mentioned topics. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.13
06.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
SO133
13.09.13
13.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
20.09.13
20.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
27.09.13
27.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E703

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

E700

The course is intended for Masters and first year PhD students with prior knowledge of undergraduate level econometrics. Working knowledge of basic probability theory, differential calculus, linear algebra and matrix algebra are assumed. Students should check if they are sufficiently familiar with these topics. A refresher course in statistics is offered from 10:00 to 18:45 on the following dates: 06.09. (SO 133), 13.09. (O 129), 20.09. (O 129), 27.09. (O 129). 


Course Content

The course is designed to offer an advanced treatment to econometric theory and applications. Topics covered include: Repetition of ordinary least squares and generalized least squares, instrumental variables estimation, simultaneous equations, generalized method of moments and maximum likelihood estimation, time series and panel data econometrics. Attendance in the lectures and exercise sessions are mandatory. Attempting exercise questions ahead of each session and taking active part during the course of the sessions is essential. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
01.10.13
03.12.13
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
SO133
02.10.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
SO133
Tutorial
Exercise
10.10.13
05.12.13
Thursday
13:45
15:15
O135
Stata Tutorial
10.10.13
05.12.13
Thursday
12:00
13:30
L7, 3-5, 257

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT801

Credits: 8

Course Content

The primary objective of this course is to gain a detailed understanding and practical working knowledge of research design and methodology fundamentals in marketing. This understanding requires a fluency in the terminology of research, as well as an appreciation of basic research techniques and concepts drawn from such diverse fields as psychology and statistics. Secondary objectives include stimulating research creativity and critical thinking in the realm of research design and methodology, and introducing and integrating a wide variety of research techniques relating to design and methodology issues. In this course, a diversity of instructional approaches (e.g., lecture, in-depth analysis and discussion of assigned articles, student presentations, a term paper, an examination) will be used. The emphasis will be on the practical application of research in furthering marketing knowledge.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-off meeting
26.09.13
26.09.13
Thursday
09:00
00:00
L9, 1-2, 205
04.10.13
06.12.13
Friday
10:30
12:00
L9, 1-2, 205

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Content

This workshop will explore the the foundations of hidden Markov models and their application to research in Marketing. The workshop will include coding of hidden Markov models in R.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
25.11.13
25.11.13
Monday
09:00
19:00
L5, 1, Roche Forum
26.11.13
26.11.13
Tuesday
09:00
12:00
L5, 1, Roche Forum

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Content

This course aims to provide a working knowledge of basic probability theory and inductive statistics. The course is especially recommended for students wanting to refresh the skills required to attend the course Advanced Econometrics I (E703). The topics roughly align with appendices B, C, and D of the book Econometric Analysis by William H. Greene (2008, 6th ed.), for example: random variables, expectations, probability distributions, random sampling, point estimators, confidence intervals,, hypothesis testing, large sample distribution theory.

 

Further information

Background reading material:

  • Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.
  • Introduction to Econometrics by Stock and Watson (2007, 2nd ed.), chapters 2 and 3.
  • Introduction to Probability Models by Ross (2000, 2nd ed.), chapters 2.1-2.5, 2.7, and 3.1-3.4

Please note that the Statistics Refresher course will cover integrals and most of the basic statistics you’ll need in Advanced Econometrics I. These topics won’t be covered again in Advanced Econometrics I. Hence you are advised to attend the Statistics Refresher course, if you have some doubts about your knowledge regarding the above mentioned topics. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.13
06.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
SO133
13.09.13
13.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
20.09.13
20.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
27.09.13
27.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129


Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM/IS910

Credits: 6

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
04.09.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
O048/50

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM801

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Recommended: Fundamentals in mathematics (including Linear Programming)


Course Content

This course aims at PhD students in information systems, business administration, and computer science. It provides a basic understanding of optimization problems and methods. The course is taught in a seminar-style format. Allocation of topics will be done together in the class.


Competences acquired

The course aims to introduce the students to fundamental linear and combinatorial optimization problems. They learn to formulate optimization models as mixed-integer linear programs, how to construct heuristics, and how to analyze the performance of heuristic algorithms. The students learn to deal with the complexity of real-world problems via aggregation, relaxation, and decomposition techniques.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.10.13
27.11.13
Wednesday
15:30
18:45
SO318


Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM901

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

OPM 801 and OPM 802


Course Content

Brown Bag Seminar: Operations Management & Operations Research Description The seminar series is supposed to be a regular non-mandatory meeting for members of the Area Operations Management, the Chair of Business Mathematics, and others. The focus is on presenting and discussing

  • ideas for further research
  • intermediate reports regarding ongoing projects, and
  • recent final results.

The seminar's designated target is to establish a discussion platform, to increase awareness of research conducted in the areas. Topics of presentations may cover all aspects being relevant in the field of Operations Management & Operations Research. All members of the areas are highly encouraged to contribute by presenting their work.

 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

 

  • Presentations during the course (50%)
  • Writing referee report (30%)
  • Active contribution to class discussion (20%) 

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
12.09.13
12.12.13
Thursday
12:00
13:30
SO318

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Content

This course aims to provide a working knowledge of basic probability theory and inductive statistics. The course is especially recommended for students wanting to refresh the skills required to attend the course Advanced Econometrics I (E703). The topics roughly align with appendices B, C, and D of the book Econometric Analysis by William H. Greene (2008, 6th ed.), for example: random variables, expectations, probability distributions, random sampling, point estimators, confidence intervals,, hypothesis testing, large sample distribution theory.

 

Further information

Background reading material:

  • Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.
  • Introduction to Econometrics by Stock and Watson (2007, 2nd ed.), chapters 2 and 3.
  • Introduction to Probability Models by Ross (2000, 2nd ed.), chapters 2.1-2.5, 2.7, and 3.1-3.4

Please note that the Statistics Refresher course will cover integrals and most of the basic statistics you’ll need in Advanced Econometrics I. These topics won’t be covered again in Advanced Econometrics I. Hence you are advised to attend the Statistics Refresher course, if you have some doubts about your knowledge regarding the above mentioned topics. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.13
06.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
SO133
13.09.13
13.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
20.09.13
20.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
27.09.13
27.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: OPM803

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Fundamentals in mathematics (including linear programming)


Course Content

Many optimization problems in practice are nonlinear. This course introduces PhD students of information systems, business administration, and computer science to the fundamentals of nonlinear optimization theory and solution methods. The course is partly taught in a seminar-style format. Topics will be assigned in class based on student preferences and needs with regard to their thesis. Students will get a fundamental understanding of problems, theory and solution methods in nonlinear optimization. This includes to learn how to formulate a nonlinear optimization problem mathematically, how to analyze its structure to detect e.g. convexities, how to implement and solve a problem with state-of-the-art modeling environments and solvers. Students can bring in and work on their own problems of interest, e.g. a specific one that they might face in their thesis or an actual standard problem often encountered in practice. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
03.12.13
03.12.13
Tuesday
08:30
11:45
SO318
06.12.13
06.12.13
Friday
10:15
13:30
SO133
09.12.13
09.12.13
Monday
10:15
13:30
SO133
13.12.13
13.12.13
Friday
10:15
13:30
SO133


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC/TAX910

Credits: 6

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
04.09.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
17:15
18:45
O251/52


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC/TAX911

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course aims at students in accounting and taxation. The course is taught in a seminar-style format. Students present their own research and discuss the presentations of other students. Students are introduced in writing referee reports to (drafts of) papers. Allocation of topics will be determined in class.


Competences acquired

Students will learn how to present and discuss their own research results. They will become acquainted with acting as discussant for other topics. Additionally, they will learn how to write a referee report.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
04.09.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
13:45
17:00
O251/52


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E703

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

E700

The course is intended for Masters and first year PhD students with prior knowledge of undergraduate level econometrics. Working knowledge of basic probability theory, differential calculus, linear algebra and matrix algebra are assumed. Students should check if they are sufficiently familiar with these topics. A refresher course in statistics is offered from 10:00 to 18:45 on the following dates: 06.09. (SO 133), 13.09. (O 129), 20.09. (O 129), 27.09. (O 129). 


Course Content

The course is designed to offer an advanced treatment to econometric theory and applications. Topics covered include: Repetition of ordinary least squares and generalized least squares, instrumental variables estimation, simultaneous equations, generalized method of moments and maximum likelihood estimation, time series and panel data econometrics. Attendance in the lectures and exercise sessions are mandatory. Attempting exercise questions ahead of each session and taking active part during the course of the sessions is essential. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
01.10.13
03.12.13
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
SO133
02.10.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
SO133
Tutorial
Exercise
10.10.13
05.12.13
Thursday
13:45
15:15
O135
Stata Tutorial
10.10.13
05.12.13
Thursday
12:00
13:30
L7, 3-5, 257

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Content

This course aims to provide a working knowledge of basic probability theory and inductive statistics. The course is especially recommended for students wanting to refresh the skills required to attend the course Advanced Econometrics I (E703). The topics roughly align with appendices B, C, and D of the book Econometric Analysis by William H. Greene (2008, 6th ed.), for example: random variables, expectations, probability distributions, random sampling, point estimators, confidence intervals,, hypothesis testing, large sample distribution theory.

 

Further information

Background reading material:

  • Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.
  • Introduction to Econometrics by Stock and Watson (2007, 2nd ed.), chapters 2 and 3.
  • Introduction to Probability Models by Ross (2000, 2nd ed.), chapters 2.1-2.5, 2.7, and 3.1-3.4

Please note that the Statistics Refresher course will cover integrals and most of the basic statistics you’ll need in Advanced Econometrics I. These topics won’t be covered again in Advanced Econometrics I. Hence you are advised to attend the Statistics Refresher course, if you have some doubts about your knowledge regarding the above mentioned topics. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.13
06.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
SO133
13.09.13
13.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
20.09.13
20.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129
27.09.13
27.09.13
Friday
10:00
18:00
O129

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: ACC&TAX916

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

The course is intended for PhD students with some prior knowledge of undergraduate level econometrics and statistics. A refresher course in statistics is offered from 10 o’clock to 18 o’clock on following dates: 06.09. (SO 133), 13.09. (O 129), 20.09. (O 129). 


Course Content

The course enables students to apply the econometric methods which are commonly used in economic research. Special attention is given to the interpretation of empirical results and understanding the potential caveats of different approaches. Topics covered include: Ordinary least squares, instrumental variables estimation, and panel data econometrics. Further topics may also be included according to demand by participants. Attendance in the lectures and exercise sessions are mandatory. Attempting exercise questions ahead of each session and taking active part during the course of the sessions is essential.

 

Textbook:

Stock, J. H. and M. Watson, Introduction to Econometrics, 3rd ed., Amsterdam: Addison-Wesley Longman, 2011.

 

Complementary textbooks:

Angrist, J.D. and J.-S. Pischke, Mostly Harmless Econometrics, Princeton: Princeton Press, 2009.

 

Other reading materials:

Hayashi, F., Econometrics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.

Verbeek, M., A Guide to Modern Econometrics. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2008.

Hamilton, J. D., Time Series Analysis. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994.

Greene, W. H., Econometric Analysis. 7th ed., Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2011.

Wooldridge, J., Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. 2nd ed. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2010. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
03.09.13
03.12.13
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
O326/28
04.09.13
04.12.13
Wednesday
08:30
10:00
L9, 7, 257

Register

Business Fall 2013

ACC/TAX910
Accounting & Taxation Area Research Seminar
ACC/TAX911
Brown-Bag Seminar Empirical Accounting & Tax
ACC801
Applied Methods & Tools in Accounting & Finance
ACC901
Contemporary Research in Accounting and Taxation
E703
Advanced Econometrics I (mostly CDSB PhD students)
Statistics Refresher
ACC&TAX916
Applied Econometrics
ACC911
Experimental Research in Accounting
E700
Mathematics for Economists
FIN801
Discrete-Time Finance
FIN910
Finance Area Research Seminar
IS801
Fundamentals of Design Science Research
IS901
Epistemological Foundations of Information Systems and Operations
OPM/IS910
Operations & Information Systems Research Seminar
IS914
Grounded Theory in Practice
MAN802
Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management Science
MAN910
Management Research Seminar
MKT801
Fundamentals of Marketing Research
PhD Workshop – Unveiling Hidden Markov Models in Marketing
OPM801
Optimization and Heuristics
OPM901
Research Seminar Operations Management & Operations Research
OPM803
Selected Topics in Nonlinear Optimization