BE INSPIRED

"The CDSB core courses and especially the electives are very useful because they equip us with solid skills in our field of research as well as in related fields." Kirstin Becker, CDSB

Course Catalog

Spring 2012


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC/TAX910

Credits: 6

Course Content

Click here (and go to Research) for the specific dates.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
14.03.12
05.12.12
Wednesday
17:15
18:45
O251


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC/TAX911

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
Kick-Off
22.02.12
22.02.12
Wednesday
15:00
17:00
SO133
22.02.12
30.05.12
Wednesday
15:00
17:00
SO133

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC802

Credits: 8

Course Content

The focus of this course will be on explaining the mechanics of various types of theoretical models which are frequently used in analytical accounting research. The objective of this course is that, after completing this course, you should be able to read and understand theoretical models, identify which modeling assumptions are critical, and link theoretical models to empirical settings.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
14.05.12
16.05.12
Each day
09:30
11:30
SO318 / SO133 / L9,7 / O131 / SO115
14.05.12
16.05.12
Each day
13:30
15:30
SO318 / SO133 / L9,7 / O131 / SO115
11.06.12
13.06.12
Each day
09:30
11:30
SO133 / O251
11.06.12
13.06.12
Each day
13:30
15:30
SO133 / O251

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC902

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course investigates strategies of normative research with regard to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) from an interdisciplinary perspective. In the first part of the course, we discuss the foundations of normative accounting research. In particular, we show how this research methodology can successfully be applied despite claims of its alleged impossibility. Furthermore, we compare the legal traditions of normative interpretation in the US and in Europe. In the second part, we analyze the existing system of IFRS from different conceptual approaches and develop grounds for their further general development as well as solutions.


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Written assignment

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
21.02.12
21.02.12
Tuesday
15:30
18:45
O251
27.03.12
27.03.12
Tuesday
15:30
18:45
O251
08.05.12
29.05.12
Tuesday
15:30
18:45
O251

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC903

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course will introduce participants to core themes and methodologies of economics-based (archival) empirical financial accounting research. We will consider the historical origins (“classics”), key seminal papers and current state of the art publications in the core areas in this field of accounting research. Those areas include:

  • Accounting information and security prices
  • Positive accounting theory / Earnings Management
  • Conservatism
  • Disclosure Research
  • International accounting research

Literature:

 

  • Kothari, S.P. (2001): Capital Market Research in Accounting, in: Journal of Accounting and Economics, Vol. 31, S. 105-231.
  • Beaver, W.H. (1997): Financial Reporting: An Accounting Revolution, Prentice Hall, 3rd ed.
  • Watts, R.L./Zimmermann (1986): Positive Accounting Theory, Prentice-Hall.

We will discuss selected individual papers for each of the areas we cover.
Requirements: 100% final exam


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • 100% final exam

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.04.12
29.05.12
Tuesday
11:00
14:00
SO115

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN802

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Discrete-Time Finance, Mathematics


Course Content

Itô calculus, stochastic differential equations, Black-Scholes theory, hedging and arbitrage pricing of European, American, and exotic options, complete and incomplete market models, consumption-investment problems, term structure theory for volatility and interest rates, default risk


Literature:

 

  • Shreve, S.E.: Stochastic Calculations for Finance II: Continuous-Time Models, Springer 2004
  • Hull, John C.: Options, Futures and Other Derivatives, Prentice Hall
  • Sondermann, D.: Introduction to Stochastic Calculus for Finance, Springer 2006

 


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Homework assignment
  • class participation
  • final take-home exam

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.12
24.05.12
Thursday
12:00
13:30
A5, 6 room C116
Tutorial
23.02.12
24.05.12
Thursday
15:30
17:00
A5, 6 room C116

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN803

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for this course are a first-year doctoral level course in microeconomics that covers game theory and information economics (signaling, adverse selection, equilibrium refinements) and a first-year doctoral level course in econometrics that covers estimation and testing theory. Some familiarity with corporate finance and financial institutions at the level of a masters level course is also assumed, but not essential. If you have no prior knowledge of corporate finance, then some chapters in an MBA-level textbook (e.g. Brealey, Myers, and Allen, Principles of Corporate Finance, 8th edition, McGraw Hill 2006; Grinblatt and Titman, Financial Markets and Corporate Strategy, 2nd edition, McGraw-Hill 2000) would be useful.


Course Content

This course is intended to enable students to understand and conduct research in corporate finance. It is taught at a first-year doctoral level and combines two objectives. Firstly, participants learn the classic contributions to the theory of modern corporate finance and understand the main contributions to the field. Secondly, the course also introduces some of the main empirical contributions to the field and studies the main econometric and statistical techniques used in corporate finance. At the end of the course participants should be familiar with the main empirical and theoretical tools used in corporate finance.


Literature:

  • Tirole, Jean: The Theory of Corporate Finance, Princeton University Press, Princeton 2006
  • de Matos, Joao Amaro, 2001, Theoretical Foundations of Corporate Finance, Princeton. Oxford (Princeton University Press)


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
20.04.12
20.04.12
Friday
09:00
17:30
L9, 1-2 room 009
04.05.12
04.05.12
Friday
09:00
17:30
L9, 1-2 room 409
18.05.12
18.05.12
Friday
09:00
17:30
L9, 1-2 room 409

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN804

Credits: 8

Course Content

The course provides students with an understanding of important empirical methods and their application in finance. It covers topics in asset pricing, corporate finance, and market microstructure. Students will learn how to derive testable implications from financial theory, and how to design and perform an empirical test of these hypotheses. The course enables students to plan and carry out empirical research in finance on their own.


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Presentation & Discussion of a recent research paper (45 - 60 minute presentation, weight 25%)
  • Empirical research project: Paper & presentation (45 - 60 minutes presentation, term paper, weight 75%)

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.02.12
16.03.12
Friday
09:00
17:30
L5, 2 room 107
Paper Presentation & Discussion
27.04.12
27.04.12
Friday
09:00
17:30
L5,2 room 107
Project Presentation
11.05.12
11.05.12
Friday
09:00
17:30
L5,2 room 107

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN901

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Introductory exam (details are provided in the first session).


Course Content

This course includes FIN620: There is abundant evidence suggesting that the standard economic paradigm of rational investors does not adequately describe behavior in financial markets. Behavioral Finance examines how individuals' attitudes and behavior affect their financial decisions. This course reviews recent research on possible mispricing in financial markets due to the nature of psychological biases. Moreover the course deals with behavioral finance models explaining investor-behavior or market anomalies when rational models provide no sufficient explanations. Topics will include among others overconfidence, prospect-theory, heuristic-driven biases and frame dependence. Behavioral finance applies scientific research on human and social cognitive and emotional biases. After completing this course, students will be able to better understand economic decisions and how they affect market prices and returns. They will know how behavioral findings are integrated with neo-classical theory.


For further information please refer to: bank.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/130.html During the term, current research papers in behavioral finance and its decision theoretic foundations will be discussed and presented by the course participants. Start date paper discussion: Thursday, February 16, 2012 in SN 163 at 11:45 (attendance mandatory). For further information about the paper discussion please go to: weber.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/149.html


Literature:

 

  • Barberis/Thaler (2003): A Survey of Behavioral Finance, in: Handbook of the Economics of Finance, Chap. 18, 1054-1123.
  • Glaser/Nöth/Weber (2004): Behavioral Finance, in: Blackwell Handbook of Judgment and Decision Making, Chap. 26, 527-546.

 


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Exam
  • Presentation

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
14.02.12
01.06.12
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
SN163
PhD Paper Presentation
14.02.12
29.05.12
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
L5,2 room 106/107
FIN620
16.02.12
01.06.12
Thursday
10:15
11:45
SN163
Tutorial
FIN620
22.02.12
30.05.12
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
SN163


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN910

Credits: 6

Course Content

For more information please click here.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
13.02.12
28.05.12
Monday
15:30
17:00
L9, 1-2 room 001

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: IS802

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Mathematics, Statistics, Java


Course Content

Content:

  • Simulating Random Numbers from a Uniform Distribution
  • Quality of Random Number Generators
  • Transformation of Uniform Deviates
  • Generating Random Numbers from Specific Distributions
  • Queueing Theory


Software or Docs you'll need to have available:

  • James E. Gentle: Random Number Generation and Monte Carlo Methods (2nd ed.), Springer-Verlag, 2003.
  • Paul Bratley, Bennet L. Fox, Linus E. Schrage: A Guide to Simulation (2nd ed.), Springer-Verlag, 1987.
  • Sheldon M. Ross: Simulation (4th ed.), Elsevier, 2006.
  • Donald E. Knuth: The Art of Computer Programming, Vol. 2 (3rd ed.), Addison-Wesley, 1998.



Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
21.02.12
01.06.12
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
L15, 1-6 room 714/715

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: IS903

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course is designed to provide doctoral students an understanding of the theories developed by the IS field to explain IS phenomenon. Much of the re-search in IS draws upon theories from other disciplines, including industrial psychology, sociology, management, and marketing, in developing models to apply to an IS research problem. However, there is a small body of IS-specific theories which are relevant not only to IS research but to research in other disciplines. The majority of the course will focus on these latter theories. The course is designed for both information systems (IS) and non-IS Ph.D. students. The readings in the course will deepen the students’ understanding of the role of theory in understanding IT related organizational phenomenon and enhance their ability to theorize about IT related to their own various research themes. The objective is to provide students with exposure to theories, the use of theories in research, and the development of new theories to help them better create new or apply existing theories to their own research.


This course will be driven by discussion and as such you are expected to come prepared to each class. Each of you should come to class having read and thought about the articles/readings for the week. My suggestion is that you read each article once, underlining interesting points, and then take notes on each article. On the first day of class, each student will volunteer to lead the discussion on one reading of their choice from the readings for the 2nd through 6th class sessions. As discussion leader, you will pose questions for the others to answer and then provide your own opinions of the questions, after each participant has had the opportunity to provide his/her perspective.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
21.06.12
21.06.12
Thursday
13:15
16:15
L15, 1-6 room 214/15
25.06.12
25.06.12
Monday
09:15
12:15
L15, 1-6 room 214/15
02.07.12
02.07.12
Monday
09:15
12:15
L15, 1-6 room 214/15
04.07.12
04.07.12
Wednesday
09:15
12:15
L15, 1-6 room 214/15
06.07.12
06.07.12
Friday
09:15
12:15
L15, 1-6 room 214/15
09.07.12
09.07.12
Monday
09:15
12:15
L15, 1-6 room 214/15
11.07.12
11.07.12
Wednesday
09:15
12:15
L15, 1-6 room 214/15

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: IS904

Credits: 8

Course Content

The aim of this course is to equip graduate students with a profound understanding and overview on contemporary qualitative research methods in Information Systems.
The course starts with a presentation giving an overview over state-of-the art methods and designs in qualitative research in Information Systems. During the course, each student will prepare a specific aspect, analyze a literature stream and present and discuss it in class. The goal is to provide a robust understanding of this research field to the participants. Moreover, the objective is to deliver background on the history of the roots of qualitative research methods in social science research.


Mandatory Literature (Individual chapters and additional literature will be assigned for pre-reading to individual course sessions)

  • Michael D. Myers, Qualitative Research in Business & Management, SAGE Publications, London, 2009
  • Robert K. Yin, Case study resarch: design and methods, 4th Edition, 2009
  • Research articles will be provided and assigned to the participants prior to the semester start.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Presentation in class

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
14.02.12
29.05.12
Tuesday
12:00
13:30
L9, 1-2 room 409


Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM/IS910

Credits: 6

Course Content

For more information, please click here.


Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: IS911

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course covers principles and foundations of context-aware computing. Approaches to context acquisition, reasoning and management are presented and current trends in research are discussed.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.12
31.05.12
Thursday
10:15
11:45
L15, 1-6 room 214/215

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: IS912

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Passing of the course IS 904 QRM IS.


Course Content

The course gives students an in-depth understanding of the qualitative research and publishing processes in IS. It is held by Professor Suprateek Sarker who is a senior editor for MISQ focusing on qualitative research.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
30.05.12
30.05.12
Wednesday
10:15
13:30
L9, 1-2 room 409
31.05.12
31.05.12
Thursday
10:15
13:30
L9, 1-2 room 409
04.06.12
06.06.12
Each day
10:15
13:30
L9, 1-2 room 409

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: IS913

Credits: 8

Course Content

This elective course will focus on the concepts and applications of structural equation modeling (SEM). Both component-based SEM (i.e., Partial Least Squares) and covariance-based SEM will be covered. It will be organized in a workshop format. Students are expected to read the articles marked with an * in the syllabus prior to the workshop. (A broader set of articles is identified in the workshop agenda for the future reference.)
The workshop will involve hands-on application with SmartPLS and AMOS. Students will be provided with sample datasets prior to the workshop, and they are responsible for installing PAWS/SPSS, SmartPLS and AMOS and ensuring that these packages are functional prior to the workshop. (Please note these products are available as demo versions (PASW/SPSS, AMOS) or free of charge (SmartPLS): SPSS (now PASW Statistics):http://www.spss.com/statistics/; AMOS: www.spss.com/amos/; SmartPLS: www.smartpls.de)


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
07.03.12
07.03.12
Wednesday
09:00
11:30
O048/050
07.03.12
07.03.12
Wednesday
14:00
17:30
O048/050
08.03.12
09.03.12
Each day
09:00
16:00
O048/050

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN803

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

By the end of the module students will:

  1. gain an overview of various quantitative methods, namely
    • Regression models (generalized linear model)
    • Factor analysis
    • Full structural equation models
    • Hierarchical linear models
    • Panel and growth curve models
    and their application in the field of management and entrepreneurship research by using different software packages such as PASW 17, AMOS and SYSTAT 10.
  2. master several challenging new themes in the area of entrepreneurship research.


Course Content

This course transmits knowledge about econometric methods and their application in empirical entrepreneurship and management research. Students will be able to understand and apply quantitative methods for analyzing various entrepreneurship and management related research questions, such as entry determinants of entrepreneurship, firm performance, organizational change, human resource management and strategic management. Students will be introduced to the theory and the application of econometric methods (such as advanced regression analyses, structural equation models, and hierarchical linear models) in management and entrepreneurship research. The application will be demonstrated with practical examples and exercises using general purpose software packages such as SPSS, as well as more specialized programs such as AMOS.


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Students are expected to apply the acquired methodical knowledge and deliver an individual term paper by the end of the semester to demonstrate their ability to analyze an empirical research question.
  • They also have to pass the end-term exam.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
29.05.12
01.06.12
Each day
09:00
17:00
L15, 14 room B101

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN804

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

MAN801 Advances in Strategic Management


Course Content

This class will address advanced topics in International Management. Participants will be familiarized with selected theories in international management, and will apply these theories to strategic and organizational issues firms face when internationalizing. We will start discussing classical perspectives as well as modern approaches that build a theoretical foundation for the following sessions. We will then turn our attention to contingencies that foster (or hinder) firms' internationalization. We first turn our attention to a topic that has received raising attention in recent research: a firms embeddedness in local versus cross-local clusters and networks. We then discuss competitive issues that firms face when internationalizing, especially on the level of corporate strategy. In that vein we analyze a most recent phenomenon, MNE from emerging markets, and try to detect whether resource exploration or exploitation can be attributed as a source of their success. We finally turn our attention to the avenues firms pursue in internationalizing and dispersing their value chain, alliances and networks. We lay a special emphasis on the dynamic aspects of dyadic as well as network relationships. We hope to enable students to understand the basic ideas of the readings, find appropriate theoretical concepts and lenses and apply them properly to their individual research topics.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
11.05.12
11.05.12
Friday
09:00
19:00
L4, 1 room 004

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN901

Credits: 8

Course Content

The course 'Corporate Governance' addresses the various systems of corporate governance that can be found in a global competitive market. Major factors in shaping these different systems of corporate governance are national institutional arrangements in the areas of capital, management, and labor. The interplay of these arrangements and, in particular, effects on the competitiveness of national systems are examined in this course. In the case of Germany a focus is put on empirical studies with regard to effects of codetermination on corporate governance. Theoretical frameworks, design of empirical studies, research methods and interpretation of results are in the center of analysis.


Exercise description: In the exercise, students are exposed to methods useful for reviewing articles for conferences or journals. As such, students review about seven papers on a wide range of issues within corporate governance. The papers have been submitted to leading European (EURAM) and American (AOM) management conferences. For each paper, students have to write a 2-3 page long report, present the paper and the reports in class as well as discuss their findings with the other participants.


 

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • 30% Seminar Paper
  • 10% Seminar Paper Presentation
  • 30% Referee Reports 1-6
  • 10% Presentation of Referee Reports 1-6
  • 10% Participation in the Exercises
  • 10% Final Referee Report

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
12.01.12
12.01.12
Thursday
10:00
17:00
O226/228
13.01.12
13.01.12
Friday
10:00
16:00
O226/228
Tutorial
16.01.12
16.01.12
Monday
14:00
16:00
O226/228
03.02.12
03.02.12
Friday
10:00
13:00
O226/228
17.02.12
17.02.12
Friday
10:00
13:00
O226/228
20.04.12
20.04.12
Friday
10:00
13:00
O226/228


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN902

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Master-level knowledge on organization and management.


Course Content

Besides a brief overview of important organizational theories, this seminar addresses selected organizational theories in an interactive approach. In particular, the participants and the lecturer critically discuss the basic assumptions of selected theories, their emergence and evolution, key contributions, applications as well as potential future development paths. The students gain thorough and detailed knowledge about relevant organizational theories and critically reflect upon them. The course puts specific emphasis on the application and development of theories in the context of the particular fields of research. On this basis, direct links between the theories and the research projects of the participants may be achieved. Then, important challenges of conducting and publishing theory-based research projects in the fields of organization and management are discussed.


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • In-class presentations and assignments.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
23.02.12
23.02.12
Thursday
08:30
13:30
O048
25.04.12
25.04.12
Wednesday
08:30
15:15
O048
03.05.12
03.05.12
Thursday
08:30
15:15
O048


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN910

Credits: 6

Course Content

For more information please click here.



Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MAN903

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Master-level knowledge on organization and management.


Course Content

This course will cover essential methodological aspects of current research in the area of Strategic Management.


 

Literature:

  • Rothaermel, F.T., Deeds, D.L. (2004). Exploration and exploitation alliances in biotechnology: A system of new product development. Strategic Management Journal, 25 (3): 201-221.
  • Rothaermel, F.T., Agung, S., Jiang, L. (2007). University entrepreneurship: A taxonomy of the literature. Industrial and Corporate Change, 16 (4): 691-791.
  • Hill, C.W.L., Rothaermel, F.T. (2003). The performance of incumbent firms in the face of radical technological innovation. Academy of Management Review, 28 (2): 257-274.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
08.05.12
08.05.12
Tuesday
10:00
17:00
L4, 1 room 004
22.05.12
22.05.12
Tuesday
10:00
17:00
SO418

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT802

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course is designed to provide students with a strong theoretical background in order to understand the functioning of instruments, activities, models, and decisions of marketing. Knowledge of these theories can then be used in order to describe, explain and predict both consumer buying behavior and managerial decision making. Gaining a profound understanding of theories and models of psychology, sociology, micro-economics and behavioral science as they pertain to marketing and consumer behavior will develop and facilitate the students' ability to conduct sound academic research and help them to derive hypotheses for their own research projects.


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Presentation
  • homework assignments
  • class participation

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-Off
28.02.12
28.02.12
Tuesday
09:00
15:00
SO115
06.03.12
27.03.12
Tuesday
09:00
15:00
SO115

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT803

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

This course takes an 'information processing' perspective to examine consumer behavior. The key focus will be to examine how consumers process marketing stimuli and make decisions. This includes topics such as motivation, attention and comprehension, memory, attitudes and attitude change, and decision making models. Both classic and current papers on these topics will be discussed. Students will be expected to read assigned articles prior to class and be prepared to discuss them.


Course Content

This goal of this seminar is to provide insights into research and content issues in Consumer Behavior. Students will read key research papers on important topics and critically evaluate the studies.


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

 

  • Paper Presentations - (25%): Students will be asked to make short presentations of assigned papers to lead a discussion on a particular article or topic. This involves a short summary as well as a set of 4- 5 discussion questions.
  • Class participation (25%): Students are expected to participate in the discussions on the research articles.
  • Research Proposal (50%): Each student will write a research proposal in one of the topic areas discussed in class.

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
07.05.12
07.05.12
Monday
09:30
12:30
L5, 1 Roche Forum
09.05.12
09.05.12
Wednesday
09:30
12:30
L5, 1 Roche Forum
11.05.12
11.05.12
Friday
09:30
12:30
L5, 1 Roche Forum
14.05.12
14.05.12
Monday
14:30
17:30
L5, 1 Roche Forum
16.05.12
16.05.12
Wednesday
14:30
17:30
L5, 1 Roche Forum
18.05.12
18.05.12
Friday
09:30
12:30
L5, 1 Roche Forum

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT901

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

MKT801


Course Content

This course aims at preparing students to formulate their own marketing research problems (e.g., as parts of their dissertation projects), to shape their contribution with respect to the existing litera¬ture, and to identify the necessary data and methods to conduct their research projects. As benchmark for the students' research projects, the actual standards with respect to innovativeness, relevance, and rigor of the leading international marketing journals will be applied. Furthermore, implications for practice have to be considered.
In this course, students will develop their own marketing research projects (e.g., as parts of their own dissertation projects). In presentation sessions, students will present their research project to all participants of the class and to the instructor. Discussions among participants as well as the instructor's feedback aim at strengthening and refining the positioning and the contribution of the individual projects. Students in the first year of their Ph.D. studies can thus use this course to get important insights for the preparation and refinement of their dissertation proposal.
At the beginning of the course, objectives, general guidelines, and best practices for developing impactful research projects will be provided in a kick-off meeting. Furthermore, best practices how to get published in leading journals will be discussed. Then, students will start developing their projects. Students are not limited with respect to the choice of their individual research topic; however, it is made in accordance with the instructor.
Students will prepare the project by developing a presentation containing the positioning and research questions, a brief literature review, the theoretical foundations and research hypotheses, as well as an outlook on potential methodological approaches (such as obtaining and analyzing adequate data). Students will present their research projects. Based on the course participants' and the instructor's feedback, students can update and refine their research projects.


The following literature has to be prepared for the kick-off meeting:

  • Davis, D. F., Golicic, S. L., Boerstler, C. N. (2011), Benefits and Challenges of Conducting Multiple Methods Research in Marketing, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 39, 3, 467-479.
  • Erdem, T. (2010), Spanning the Boundaries, Journal of Marketing Research, 47, February, 1-2.
  • Gulati, R. (2007), Tent Poles, Tribalism, and Boundary Spanning: The Rigor-Relevance Debate in Management Research, Academy of Management Journal, 50, 4, 775-782.
  • Homburg, Ch. (2003), Publishing Processes in the Academic Marketing Discipline in the United States: A German Perspective, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 31, 3, 348-350.
  • Huber, J. (2008), The Value of Sticky Articles, Journal of Marketing Research, 45, June, 257-260.
  • Jaworski, B. J. (2011), On Managerial Relevance, Journal of Marketing, 75, July, 211-224.
  • Kohli, A. K. (2009), From the Editor, Journal of Marketing, 73, January, 1-2.
  • Lehmann, D. R., McAlister, L., Staelin, R. (2011), Sophistication in Research in Marketing, Journal of Marketing, 75, July, 155-165.
  • Lilien, G. L. (2011), Bridging the Academic-Practitioner Divide in Marketing Decision Models, Journal of Marketing, 75, July, 196-210.
  • Reibstein, D. J., Day, G., Wind, J. (2009), Guest Editorial: Is Marketing Academia Losing Its Way? Journal of Marketing, 73, July, 1-3.
  • Stewart, D. W. (2009), The Role of Method: Some Parting Thoughts from a Departing Editor, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 37, 4, 381-383.
  • Varadarajan, P. R. (2003), Musings on Relevance and Rigor of Scholarly Research in Marketing, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 31, 4, 368-376.
  • Yadav, M. S. (2010), The Death of Conceptual Articles and Implications for Knowledge Development, Journal of Marketing, 74, January, 1-19.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Presentation of the research project (60%)
  • active participation in the discussion of the other presentations (40%)

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-Off
08.03.12
08.03.12
Thursday
09:00
11:00
L5, 1 Roche Forum
Presentation Sessions
18.04.12
18.04.12
Wednesday
09:00
13:00
L5, 1 Roche Forum
Presentation Sessions
25.04.12
26.04.12
Each day
09:00
13:00
L5, 1 Roche Forum

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT902

Credits: 8

Course Content

We will be building on the knowledge and concepts that you learned in the 'Fundamentals of Marketing Research' course. Advances in Marketing Research builds on this background by providing additional depth in selected methodological areas (e.g., scale development and experimental design) and by affording students an opportunity to apply some of the methodological tools gained in the Fundamentals course. Moreover, a major focus of Advances in Marketing Research is that of developing students' abilities to make original contributions to the literature in their respective disciplines. As such, Advances in Marketing Research is concerned with the total research process from the generation of research ideas through the publication of the research manuscript.


The goals of Advances in Marketing Research will be pursued through:

  • Reading and discussing articles on research techniques from a variety of behavioral disciplines.
  • The critique and redesign of past empirical research studies.
  • The partial design of a study which represents an extension/improvement of an existing empirical study, hereafter referred to as the student's independent research project (IRP).
  • The revision and empirical evaluation of an existing unidimensional, multiple-item scale (set of related multiple-item scales) or the development and empirical evaluation of a new multiple-item scale (set of related multiple-item scales). This scaling project is typically a part of the student's IRP, but need not be.

Literature:

  • Donald T. Campbell and Julian C. Stanley, Experimental and Quasi-experimental Design for Research, Chicago: Rand McNally, 1963.
  • Thomas D. Cook and Donald T. Campbell, Quasi-Experimentation: Design and Analysis Issues for Field Settings, Chicago: Rand McNally, 1979.
  • Selected articles to be distributed prior to each session.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • summaries and critiques (20%)
  • an final exam at the end of the course (30%)
  • and the independent research reports (oral and written) (50%)

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-Off
24.02.12
24.02.12
Friday
14:00
15:30
L9, 1-2 room 002
24.02.12
25.05.12
Friday
14:00
15:30
L9, 1-2 room 002


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT910

Credits: 6

Course Content

For more information, please click here.



Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM/IS910

Credits: 6

Course Content

For more information, please click here.



Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM802

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Fundamentals in mathematics and statistics.


Course Content

The course introduces some fundamental techniques for stochastic modelling and optimization, and it discusses their application in supply chain research.


Key topics include:

  • stochastic processes
  • Markov chains
  • stochastic dynamic programming inventory theory
  • revenue management
  • The course is taught in a seminar-style format.

Literature

  • Porteus EL (2002).
  • Foundations of Stochastic Inventory Theory, Stanford Business Books. Puterman M (1994).
  • Markov Decision Processes: Discrete Stochastic Dynamic Programming, Wiley. Tijms HC (1994).
  • Stochastic Models: An Algorithmic Approach, Wiley. Zipkin P (2000).
  • Foundations of Inventory Management, McGraw-Hill. Talluri K, van Ryzin G (2004).
  • The Theory and Practice of Revenue Management, Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades Presentation during the course


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
14.02.12
29.05.12
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
SO318


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC/TAX910

Credits: 6

Course Content

Click here (and go to Research) for the specific dates.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
14.03.12
05.12.12
Wednesday
17:15
18:45
O251


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC/TAX911

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
Kick-Off
22.02.12
22.02.12
Wednesday
15:00
17:00
SO133
22.02.12
30.05.12
Wednesday
15:00
17:00
SO133

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: TAX801

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of national and international tax law.


Course Content

This course integrates tax law with tax planning in a national and an international environment. The main topics include

  1. Fundamentals of Tax Planning and Tax Neutrality
  2. The Choice of the Organisational Form
  3. Flat Tax and Dual Income Tax
  4. International Tax Planning
  5. Effective Tax Rates

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Seminar paper
  • Presentation

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
02.03.12
02.03.12
Friday
13:45
17:00
O251
30.03.12
30.03.12
Friday
13:45
17:00
O251
20.04.12
20.04.12
Friday
13:45
17:00
O251
27.04.12
27.04.12
Friday
13:45
17:00
O251
04.05.12
04.05.12
Friday
13:45
17:00
O251
25.05.12
25.05.12
Friday
13:45
17:00
O251

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: TAX913

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

The course should enable participants to identify gaps in the existing literature and to evaluate the potential of new research ideas. As a primary objective, the course supports students in developing their empirical research projects.


Course Content

This course gives an introduction to the main subjects and methodologies of empirical taxation research. Important landmark papers as well as contributions from the current research frontier will be discussed. If the relevant data is available, students get the chance to understand the empirical approach in practice in the computer lab. Following topics may be included:

  • Tax incidence
  • Tax efficiency
  • Taxes in the context of mergers and acquisition
  • Taxation of multinationals
  • Tax avoidance and tax evasion
  • Capital taxation
  • Labor taxation

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Research project
  • Presentation

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
15.02.12
30.05.12
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
SO115


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: TAX915

Credits: 8

Course Content

Measurement of effective tax burdens: different concepts and interpretations (backward-looking, forward-looking approaches; neo-classical models, model-firm approach, micro-simulation) Impact of Taxation on (cross-border) financing and location decisions of multinationals
Taxation of R&D Investments
Taxation of Labour Income
Tax accounting and measurement of effective group tax rates


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-Off
14.02.12
14.02.12
Tuesday
13:00
15:00
SO115
29.03.12
29.03.12
Thursday
08:30
18:45
SO133
26.04.12
26.04.12
Thursday
08:30
18:45
O251/52
27.04.12
27.04.12
Friday
08:30
13:00
SO133

Register

Business Spring 2012

ACC/TAX910
Accounting & Taxation Area Research Seminar
ACC/TAX911
Brown Bag Seminar Empirical Accounting & Tax
ACC802
Analytical Accounting Research
ACC902
Normative Accounting Research
ACC903
Empirical Accounting Research
FIN802
Continuous-Time Finance
FIN803
Corporate Finance
FIN804
Econometrics of Financial Markets
FIN901
Behavioral Finance
FIN910
Finance Area Research Seminar
IS802
Simulation
IS903
Information Systems Theories
IS904
Qualitative Research Methods in Information Systems
OPM/IS910
Operations & Information Systems Research Seminar
IS911
Context-Aware Computing
IS912
Conducting, Crafting, and Publishing Qualitative Research in the Information Systems Discipline
IS913
Structural Equation Modeling in the IS Discipline
MAN803
Applied Econometrics in Management and Entrepreneurship Research
MAN804
Advances in International Management
MAN901
Corporate Governance Systems
MAN902
Advanced Organization Theories
MAN910
Management Research Seminar
MAN903
Exemplary Research in the Organizational Sciences
MKT802
Marketing Theories
MKT803
Consumer Behavior
MKT901
Designing Marketing Research Projects
MKT902
Advances in Marketing Research
MKT910
Marketing Area Seminar
OPM802
Dynamic and Stochastic Models in Supply Chain Research
TAX801
Business Taxation - Tax Law and Tax Planning
TAX913
Empirical Taxation Research
TAX915
Essays in International Taxation