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"The CDSB core courses and especially the electives are very useful because they equip us with solid skills in our field of research as well as in related fields." Kirstin Becker, CDSB

Course Catalog

Spring 2016

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC802

Credits: 8

Course Content

1. Accounting and Economics I – Issues of Income Determination and Costing

  • Good Modeling
  • Income Measurement
  • Product Costing
  • Accounting Errors – Separability Issues

Readings: 

  • Christensen, J. and J. Demski: “Accounting Theory. An Information Content Perspective,” Irwin/McGraw Hill, 2003, chapters 1-4
  • Christensen, J: “Good Analytical Modeling,” European Accounting Review Vol. 20, No. 1, 41–51, 2011
  • Christensen, J., and J. Demski: “Factor Choice Distortion under Cost-Based Reimbursement,” Journal of Management Accounting Research, 2003, pp. 145-160.
  • Labro, E., and M. Vanhoucke: “A Simulation Analysis and Interactions among errors in Costing Systems,” The Accounting Review, 939-962, 2007

Additional readings:

  •  Christensen, J., and J. Demski: “Product Costing in the Presence of Endogenous Sub-cost Functions,” Review of Accounting Studies, 1997, pp. 65-88.
  • Maher, M., and L. Marais: “A field study on the limitations of activity based costing when resources are provided on a joint and indivisible basis,” Journal of Accounting Research, 129-142, 1998
  • Datar, S., and M. Gupta: “Aggregation, Specification and Measurement Error in Product Costing,” The Accounting Review, pp 567 - 591, 1994.
  • Sims, C.: “Macroeconomics and Methodology.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 10:105-120, 1996.

 

2. Accounting and Economics II – Issues of Accounting and Control 

  • The agency Model
  • Performance Evaluation and Controllability
  • Valuation and Stewardship
  • Information content in Accounting Numbers
  • The inherent Bias of Financial Reporting
  • Errors of Accounting

Readings: 

  • Christensen, J., and J. Demski: “Accounting Theory. An Information Content Perspective,” Irwin/McGraw Hill, 2003, chapters 11-18
  • Demski, J.S. :“Performance Measure Manipulation,” Contemporary Accounting Research, 1998 (fall).
  • Christensen, J.A. and J.S. Demski: “Profit, Allocation under Ancillary Trade,” Journal of Accounting Research, 1998 (spring).
  • Joel S. Demski and David E. M. Sappington, “Summarization with errors: a perspective on empirical investigations of agency relationships.” Management Accounting Research, 1999, 10, 21-37

Additional Readings: 

  • Antle, R., and J. S. Demski: “The Controllability Principle in Responsibility Accounting.” The Accounting Review. 53: 700-718, 1988.
  • Feltham, G., and J. Xie: “Performance Measure Congruity and Diversity In Multi-Task Principal-Agent Relations.” The Accounting Review. 429-453, 1994.
  • Holmström, B.R.: “Moral Hazard and Observability.” The Bell Journal of Economics 10: 74-91, 1979.

 

3. Accounting and Economics III – Issues of Accounting Valuation, Information, and Markets 

  • Information and Accounting
  • Information and Competition
  • Information and Markets
  • Information content of Fair Value Accounting
  • Examples.

Readings: 

  • Christensen, J., and J. Demski: “Accounting Theory. An Information Content Perspective,” Irwin/McGraw Hill, 2003, chapters 5-10, 19-20.
  • Christensen, J., and H. Frimor: “Fair Value, Accounting Aggregation and Multiple Sources of Information,” pp 35-51, in: “Essays on Accounting Theory in Honor of Joel S. Demski” Edited by R. Antle, P. J. Liang, and F. Gjesdal, Kluwer, 2007.
  • Christensen, J.:“Accounting Errors and Errors of Accounting,” The Accounting Review, Vol. 85, No. 6, 2010 pp. 1827–1838

Additional Readings: 

  • Feltham, G., and J. Ohlson: “Valuation and clean surplus accounting for operating and financial activities.” Contemporary Accounting Research 11 (2): 689-731. 1995.
  • Feltham, G., and J. Ohlson: “Uncertainty Resolution and the Theory of Depreciation Measurement.” Journal of Accounting Research 34, 209-234.
  • Demski, J.: “Managerial Uses of Accounting Information,” Springer, 2009, ch. 10.4, pp 229-239, 1996.
  • Christensen, J.:“Conceptual Frameworks of Accounting from an Information Perspective,” Accounting and Business Research, Vol.40, no.3, 2010.
  • Gjesdal, F.: “Accounting for stewardship.” Journal of Accounting Research 19(1): 208- 231, 1981.
  • Christensen, J. and J. S. Demski: “Anticipatory Reporting Standards,” Accounting Horizons, 2007, pp.351-370.

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
11.04.16
Monday
09:00
12:30
A5,6 - Seminar room C 116
12.04.16
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
A5,6 - Seminar room C 115
13.04.16
Wednesday
09:00
12:30
L9,7 - Seminar room 509
14.04.16
Thursday
09:00
12:30
O126
15.04.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
L9,7 room 308

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC902

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course investigates strategies of normative research with regard to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) from an interdisciplinary perspective. In the first part of the course, we discuss the foundations of normative accounting research. In particular, we show how this research methodology can successfully be applied despite claims of its alleged impossibility. Furthermore, we compare the legal traditions of normative interpretation in the US and in Europe. In the second part, we analyze the existing system of IFRS from different conceptual approaches and develop grounds for their further general development as well as solutions.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
23.02.16
Tuesday
15:30
18:45
SO 133
05.04.16
Tuesday
15:30
18:45
SO 133
10.06.16
Friday
10:15
18:45
O 226/228

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: ACC903

Credits: 8

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
01.03.16
Tuesday
10:00
13:00
ifm, room 210
08.03.16
Tuesday
10:00
13:00
ifm, room 210
15.03.16
Tuesday
10:00
11:30
ifm, room 210
15.03.16
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
SO 133
22.03.16
Tuesday
10:00
13:00
ifm, room 210
05.04.16
Tuesday
10:00
13:00
ifm, room 210
12.04.16
Tuesday
10:00
11:30
ifm, room 210
12.04.16
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
SO 133
19.04.16
10:00
13:00


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: ACC/TAX911

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course aims at students in accounting and taxation. The course is taught in a seminar-style format. Students present their own research and discuss the presentations of other students. Students are introduced in writing referee reports to (drafts of) papers. Allocation of topics will be determined in class.
Students will learn how to present and discuss their own research results. They will become acquainted with acting as discussant for other topics. Additionally, they will learn how to write a referee report.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
23.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
13:45
15:15

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: ACC904

Credits: 6

Course Content

The course is designed for Ph.D. students in accounting, finance, management, and related fields who have an interest in studying the information environment of a firm.  The course aims to survey a wide variety of empirical research in accounting in order to advance your understanding of how to conduct research in this field.  The course covers methodological issues, theoretical background, and selected empirical papers.  The assigned papers serve as examples to illustrate challenges of empirical research in accounting.

The course is structured around different identification approaches that are frequently used in recent accounting research.  This structure reflects the increasing importance of causal inference in accounting research.  Since research in econ and finance took a lead on these questions, I will integrate a number of examples from these fields into the course.

Grading will be based on a written exam (50%), in-class presentations (20%), and a homework assignment [referee report] (30%).

 

General Readings:

  • Angrist, J.D., and J.-S. Pischke [2008]. Mostly Harmless Econometrics. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Gassen, J. [2014]. Causal Inference in Empirical Archival Financial Accounting Research. Accounting, Organizations, and Society 39(7), pp. 535–544.
  • Gow, I.D., D.F. Larcker, and P.C. Reiss [2016]. Causal Inference in Accounting Research. Journal of Accounting Research Conference 2015, available at http://ssrn.com/abstract=2729565.
  • Imbens, G.W., and D.B. Rubin [2015]. Causal Inference for Statistics, Social, and Biomedical Sciences. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.  

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
29.04.16
Friday
08:30
13:30
L9, 1-2, room 210
13.05.16
Friday
08:30
11:30
L9, 7, room 308
18.05.16
Wednesday
09:00
11:45
O 048
27.05.16
Friday
08:30
13:30
O 048
03.06.16
Friday
09:00
13:00
O 048
22.06.16
Wednesday
09:00
13:00
SN 265
28.06.16
Tuesday
09:00
13:00
SN 265

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN802

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Discrete-Time Finance, Mathematics


Course Content

Itô calculus, stochastic differential equations, Black-Scholes theory, hedging and arbitrage pricing of European, American, and exotic options, complete and incomplete market models, consumption-investment problems, term structure theory for volatility and interest rates, default risk 

 

Further information 

Participation in the lectures is open to all interested students. Participation in the exams is restricted to eligible students. 

Literature 

  • Shreve, S.E.: Stochastic Calculations for Finance II: Continuous-Time Models, Springer 2004 
  • Hull, John C.: Options, Futures and Other Derivatives, Prentice Hall 
  • Sondermann, D.: Introduction to Stochastic Calculus for Finance, Springer 2006 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

  • Homework assignments
  • Class participation
  • Final take-home exam

 

Tutorial biweekly


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
13:45
15:15
L9,7 room 308
Tutorial
25.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
15:30
17:00
L9,7 room 308

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN803

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for this course are a first-year doctoral level course in microeconomics that covers game theory and information economics (signaling, adverse selection, equilibrium refinements) and a first-year doctoral level course in econometrics that covers estimation and testing theory. Some familiarity with corporate finance and financial institutions at the level of a masters level course is also assumed, but not essential. If you have no prior knowledge of corporate finance, then some chapters in an MBA-level textbook (e.g. Brealey, Myers, and Allen, Principles of Corporate Finance, 8th edition, McGraw Hill 2006; Grinblatt and Titman, Financial Markets and Corporate Strategy, 2nd edition, McGraw-Hill 2000) would be useful.


Course Content

This course is intended to enable students to understand and conduct research in corporate finance. It is taught at a first-year doctoral level and combines two objectives. Firstly, participants learn the classic contributions to the theory of modern corporate finance and understand the main contributions to the field. Secondly, the course also introduces some of the main empirical contributions to the field and studies the main econometric and statistical techniques used in corporate finance. At the end of the course participants should be familiar with the main empirical and theoretical tools used in corporate finance.
Literature
Tirole, Jean: The Theory of Corporate Finance, Princeton University Press, Princeton 2006
de Matos, Joao Amaro, 2001, Theoretical Foundations of Corporate Finance, Princeton. Oxford (Princeton University Press)

For course details, click here. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
19.02.16
Friday
08:30
12:15
L9, 1-2, 409
04.03.16
Friday
08:30
12:15
L9, 1-2, 409
18.03.16
Friday
08:30
12:15
L9, 1-2, 409
08.04.16
Friday
08:30
12:15
L9, 1-2, 409
22.04.16
Friday
08:30
12:15
L9, 1-2, 409
06.05.16
Friday
08:30
12:15
L9, 1-2, 409

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN804

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Mathematics for Economists (E700)

Discrete Time Finance (FIN801)


Course Content

The course provides Ph.D. students with an understanding of important empirical methods and their application in finance. The first part of the course covers several topics in asset pricing, including the Fama-MacBeth regression approach and the GMM estimation methodology. The second part of the course is devoted to methodological questions in corporate finance, and includes event studies, panel econometrics, discrete choice modelling, and endogeneity issues. Students will learn how to derive testable implications from financial theory, and how to design and perform an empirical test of these hypotheses. The course enables students to plan and carry out empirical research in finance on their own.

Evaluation Form:

  • Empirical research project (paper, presentation, discussion): 60%
  • Final exam: 40%

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
10.02.16
Wednesday
15:30
19:00
L9, 1-2, room 409
15.02.16
Monday
09:00
10:30
L9, 1-2, room 409
17.02.16
Wednesday
15:30
19:00
L9, 7, room 308
22.02.16
Monday
09:00
10:30
L9, 1-2, room 409
24.02.16
Wednesday
15:30
19:00
L9, 1-2, room 409
29.02.16
Monday
09:00
10:00
L9, 1-2, room 409
16.03.16
Wednesday
15:30
19:00
L9, 1-2, room 409
25.04.16
Monday
09:00
12:30
L9, 1-2, room 409
27.04.16
Wednesday
15:30
19:00
L9, 1-2, room 409

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: FIN901

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Introductory exam (details are provided in the first session).


Course Content

This course includes FIN620: There is abundant evidence suggesting that the standard economic paradigm of rational investors does not adequately describe behavior in financial markets. Behavioral Finance examines how individuals' attitudes and behavior affect their financial decisions. This course reviews recent research on possible mispricing in financial markets due to the nature of psychological biases. Moreover the course deals with behavioral finance models explaining investor-behavior or market anomalies when rational models provide no sufficient explanations. Topics will include among others overconfidence, prospect-theory, heuristic-driven biases and frame dependence. Behavioral finance applies scientific research on human and social cognitive and emotional biases. 

Literature 

  • Barberis/Thaler (2003): A Survey of Behavioral Finance, in: Handbook of the Economics of Finance, Chap. 18, 1054-1123. 
  • Glaser/Nöth/Weber (2004): Behavioral Finance, in: Blackwell Handbook of Judgment and Decision Making, Chap. 26, 527-546. 

 

Further information

The papers for the Paper Discussion series will be chosen in the first session. Attendance of the first session is mandatory. Ph.D. students who want to get credits for the course are allowed to miss one session. Professor Weber has to be notified of the abscence in advance. 

For further information please refer to: bank.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/130.html During the term, current research papers in behavioral finance and its decision theoretic foundations will be discussed and presented by the course participants. For further information about the paper discussion please go to: weber.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/149.html 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades 

  • Exam
  • Presentation


Competences acquired

After completing this course, students will be able to better understand economic decisions and how they affect market prices and returns. They will know how behavioral findings are integrated with neo-classical theory. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.16
31.03.16
Tuesday
13:45
15:15

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: FIN911

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course focuses on recent research topics in finance. In the course, we will discuss the papers presented by the seminar speakers in the University of Mannheim Finance faculty seminar. The class will typically take place on those Mondays during the semester on which a seminar presentation by an external speaker will be given. For updates on the schedule, please regularly consult the following webpage: www.finance.uni-mannheim.de The format of the course consists of two main parts. In the morning of seminar days we will meet and one student will present the paper that will be presented in the afternoon in the official faculty seminar by an external speaker. The presentation should be about 30 minutes. Another student will then discuss the paper (like a formal extended conference discussion, max 15-20min). Based on that, we will then discuss the paper and its contribution to the literature in the forum. Thus, each student is required to carefully read all papers prior to class. Each student will present and discuss at least once during the semester. Topics will be assigned during the introductory meeting. Furthermore, each participant is required to write a short (1-2 pages max) referee report on one additional paper that he or she is not discussing or presenting. The second part is an informal meeting with the speaker prior to the seminar (if the speaker’s schedule allows). In this meeting, neither I nor other senior faculty members will be present and students are free to talk about the paper or whatever other topic that is relevant for finance researchers and in which students and the speaker share a common interest (“Cookies with the Speaker”). Regular participation in the morning sessions as well as in the meetings with the speakers are a necessary condition to fulfill the course requirements.


Course Materials:
The course is based on the papers presented during the faculty seminar. The respective papers will be posted on the seminar webpage.


Competences acquired

During this course, students learn to understand and discuss research topics (potentially including topics from fields in which they might not be experts). This will allow them to develop own research ideas and benefit more from the official seminar series. Furthermore, they will be trained in developing and structuring discussions of research papers and act as a referee. These skills will turn out useful for future conference participations and communication with journal editors. Finally, the meetings with speakers will give students the possibility to talk to the presenters in an informal atmosphere and discuss their own or the speaker’s research or talk about issues like career development, exchange visits, or the international job market process.

Students are required to participate in the morning classes, the “Cookies with Speaker” sessions, and the faculty seminar. Regular participation is necessary to fulfill the course requirements. Students who miss meetings on more than two days, will not pass the course.

 

Please note: Class will not be held on Monday, 25.04.16


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-off
15.02.16
Monday
10:00
11:00
tba
Meetings
22.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
10:00
11:30
tba
Cookies with the Speaker
22.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
14:00
15:30
tba

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: FIN913

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

The course assumes some knowledge of probability theory and statistics and as well some knowledge of financial instruments and their valuation.

German language skills required.


Course Content

This course includes FIN660. Subject of the course are advanced concepts for measuring risk, quantitative methods for the management of market risks and credit risks and approaches to risk based performance management and capital allocation.

Literature

  • Albrecht/Huggenberger (2015): Finanzrisikomanagement, Stuttgart. 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades 

  • Exam

Competences acquired

After a successful completion of the course participants are familiar with the most important risk measures and their parametric/non-parametric estimation, with methods of calculating the value at risk of individual financial positions and portfolios of financial instruments, especially the delta-normal-method. They also have knowledge of the notion of credit value at risk and the most important credit risk models. Finally, they are familiar with the concept of return on risk adjusted capital (RORAC) and the fundamental approaches to capital allocation.

 

Course dates will depend on the availability of the participants. Please contact Mr. Huggenberger (huggenberger(at)bwl.uni-mannheim.de)


Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: FIN921

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course focuses on recent popular topics in the area of Macro-Finance with a particular emphasis on empirical studies on the research frontier. In the course, we will discuss papers from a reading list as well as empirical methodologies employed therein. Students are strongly encouraged to propose an own topic in agreement with the supervisor or choose a topic from a tentative list. Below you can find several examples of topics we will work on. A complete list of topics and a detailed schedule for the course will be made available in due time. For each topic, there will be provided a data set or I will support students in collecting the required data. While working on the paper, you will be in contact with the instructor on a regular basis. There will be three plenary sessions and typically around two one-to-one individual meetings with the instructor. During these meetings we will go over preliminary versions of your term paper and talk about further progress. In this way, you will receive feedback on the work you have accomplished at each stage.

The workshop format consists out of two parts: (i) an interactive track, i.e. participation in plenary sessions and individual meetings with the instructor; and (ii) an individual track, i.e. completing an empirical project and writing a term paper. The first part will include an introductory Matlab session. The aim of this session will be to provide students with a basic toolkit to conduct independent research analysis. We require no prior knowledge of the programming language or expertise in the field of Macro-Finance. In the second part, students will be asked to complete a research project and prepare a topical paper in the area of Macro-Finance of about 15 pages in length. There will be a possibility to work in small groups of two. Eventually, students are required to present their final papers in a block-seminar. For each topic a discussant will be appointed. Each student will act as a presenter and a discussant. Topics and discussants will be assigned during the kick-off meeting.


Competences acquired

The block seminar will be similar in its style to major scientific finance conferences. In this course, students will learn to follow-up with and discuss about current research topics from the popular literature on Macro-Finance. This will allow them to develop own research ideas and benefit from the possibility of joint work. Furthermore, students will be trained in writing a scientific paper, i.e. gain experience in designing, executing and reporting research. The acquired skills will turn out useful for PhD students working on a thesis or looking for a possible topic for a thesis and future conference participation and communication with journal editors. 


Course Materials:

The course is based on the papers from a reading list. The respective papers and the associated data sets will be posted online in due time.

 

Please note: Individual sessions upon agreement


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Kick-off
05.02.16
Friday
12:30
13:30
tba
Plenary Sessions
12.02.16
19.02.16
Friday
12:30
15:30
tba
Block Seminar
27.05.16
03.06.16
Friday
12:30
15:30
tba

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: FIN922

Credits: 6

Course Content

The objective of this course is to provide theoretical and empirical foundation for the nexus of credit risk between financial sector and sovereigns. This nexus has recently been at the heart of the ongoing sovereign and financial sector crises in Europe, while historically having been a greater focus in study of emerging market debt crises.

 

The course will focus on

  1. Providing micro-foundations of sovereign debt given that there is no explicit institutional structure such as bankruptcy code which allows creditors to extract repayments, and how political economy considerations such as government myopia and populism affect the demand and nature of sovereign debt ;
  2. Understanding how credit risk migrates from the financial sector to the sovereign and vice-versa, in what is increasingly being called the “unholy nexus” or “doom loop” or the “diabolical loop”;
  3. Tying this nexus to micro-foundations of sovereign debt repayments as well as to incentives of highly-leveraged intermediaries such as banks;
  4. Tracing out the real-sector consequences of this nexus and isolating the channel through which it affects the real-sector; and,
  5. Finally, studying the efficacy of regulatory interventions that have been designed such as the regulatory stress tests of banks, design of risk weights in bank capital requirements, and unconventional monetary policy and lender-of-last-resort actions of central banks.

The ultimate objective is to make sense of the following flow-chart of risks and their sources, from Viral Acharya’s forthcoming Toulouse Lectures in Economics on “The Nexus Between Financial Sector and Sovereign Credit Risks”.

 

Structure of Meetings and Evaluation:

Several of the in-class presentations will be done by Sascha Steffen and the rest by the students enrolled in the course. We will sort out who presents what at the organizational meeting.

Regardless of the presentation, all enrolled or attending the course will be required to write a high-quality literature survey of up to 10 pages covering any one of the six sessions and the related papers (included below or otherwise). The survey will be due one week after the course is over, so on June 8th.

 

Session 1: Micro-foundations for Sovereign Debt Repayment

Course overview by Sascha Steffen

Students will present paper(s) based on the following literature: 1st half of class:

  • EATON, J. AND M. GERSOVITZ (1981), "Debt with Potential Repudiation: Theoretical and Empirical Analysis", The Review of Economic Studies, 48, 2, 289-309.
  • BULOW, J. AND K. ROGOFF (1989), "A Constant Recontracting Model of Sovereign Debt", Journal of Political Economy, 97, 11, 155-178.
  • BULOW, J. AND K. ROGOFF (1989), "Sovereign Debt: Is  to Forgive  Forget? ", American Economic Review, 79, 1, 43-50.

2nd half of class:

  • BRONER, F., A. MARTIN, AND J. VENTURA (2010), "Sovereign Risk and Secondary Markets", American Economic Review, 100, 1523-1555.
  • DU, W. AND J. SHREGER (2015), "Sovereign Risk, Currency Risk, and Corporate Balance Sheets", Working Paper.

   

Session 2: Sovereign and Financial Sector Nexus: Role of Government Myopia

Students will present

1st half of class:

  • ACHARYA, V. V. AND R. G. RAJAN (2013), "Sovereign Debt, Government Myopia, and the Financial Sector", Review of Financial Studies, 26, 1526-1560.

2nd half of class:

  • ACHARYA, V. V. AND R. G. RAJAN (2015), "Dynamics of Growth, Debt and Taxation", Work In Progress.

Recommended related literature:

  • BOLTON, P. AND O. JEANNE (2011), "Sovereign Default Risk and Bank Fragility in Financially Integrated Economies", IMF Economic Review, 59, 162-194.
  • GENNAIOLI, N., A. MARTIN, AND S. ROSSI (2014): "Sovereign Default, Domestic Banks, and Financial Institutions", Journal of Finance, 69, 819-866.
  • UHLIG, H. (2013), "Sovereign Default Risk and Banks in a Monetary Union",
  • German Economic Review, 15, 23-41.

 

Session 3:  Sovereign and Financial Sector Nexus: Banking Crises and Bailouts

Students will present

1st half of class:

  • ACHARYA, V. V., I. DRECHSLER, AND P. SCHNABL (2014), "A Pyrrhic Victory? Bank Bailouts and Sovereign Credit Risk", Journal of Finance, 69, 2689-2739.

2nd half of class:

  •  CROSIGNANI, M. (2015): "Why Are Banks Not Recapitalized During Crises?," Working Paper.

Recommended related literature:

  • BRUNNERMEIER, M. K. (2015), "Diabolic Loop between Sovereign and Banking Risk", G7 Bundesbank and BMF Panel Discussion.
  • FARHI, E. AND J. TIROLE (2014), "Deadly Embrace: Sovereign and Financial Balance Sheets Doom Loops," Working Paper.
  • GENNAIOLI, N., A. MARTIN, AND S. ROSSI (2014):"Banks, Government Bonds, and Default: What Do the Data Say?” Working Paper.

 

Session 4: Sovereign and Financial Sector Nexus: Bank and Regulatory Moral Hazard

Sascha Steffen will present

1st half of class:

  • ACHARYA, V. V. AND S. STEFFEN (2015), "The Greatest Carry Trade Ever? Understanding Eurozone Bank Risks", Journal of Financial Economics, 115, 215- 236.

2nd half of class:

  • KORTE, J. AND S. STEFFEN (2015), "Zero Risk Contagion - Banks' Sovereign Exposure and Sovereign Risk Spillovers", Working Paper.

Recommended related literature:

  • ACHARYA, V. V., R. ENGLE, AND D. PIERRET (2014), "Testing Macro-prudential Stress Tests: The Risk of Regulatory Risk Weights", Carnegie-Rochester Public Policy Conference Volume of the Journal of Monetary Economics, 65, 36-53.

 

Session 5: Real Effects of Sovereign Crises: Active and Passive Banking Channels

Sascha Steffen will present

1st half of class:

  • Acharya, V.V., M. Ignatowski, and S. Steffen (2015): "Financial Instability, Bank Lending and Miscallocation of Credit," Working Paper.

Students will present paper(s) based on the following literature: 2nd half of class:

  • Acharya, V.V., t. eisert. c. eufinger, and c. hirsch (2015): "Real Effects of the Sovereign Debt Crisis in Europe: Evidence from Syndicated Loans," Working Paper.
  • Bocola, L. (2015), "The Pass-Through of Sovereign Risk", Working Paper.
  • perez, D.j. (2015), "Sovereign Debt, Domestic Banks and the Provision of Public Liquidity", Working Paper.
  • bofondi, M., l. carpinelli, e. sette (2013): "Credit Risk Supply During a Sovereign Debt Crisis," Working Paper.
  • becker, b., and v. Ivashina (2014), "Financial Repression in the European Sovereign Debt Crisis," Working Paper.
  • popov, a., and n. van horen (forthcoming), "Exporting Sovereign Stress: Evidence from Syndicated Bank Lending During the Euro Area Crisis", Review of Finance.

 

Session 6: The Impact of Central Bank Interventions During Sovereign Crises

Sascha Steffen will present

1st half of class:

  • Acharya, V.V., b. imbierowicz, S. Steffen, and d. teichmann (2015): "Does Lack of Financial Stability Impair the Transmission of Monetary Policy," Working Paper.

2nd half of class: 

  • Acharya, V.V., D. Pierret, and S. Steffen (2015): " Do Central Bank Interventions Limit the Market Discipline from Short-Term Debt?" Working Paper.

Recommended related literature:

  • Acharya, V.V., t. eisert. c. eufinger, and c. hirsch (2015): "Whatever it Takes: The Real Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy", Work In Progress.
  • ANDRADE, P., CAHN, C., FRAISSE, H., AND J. MESONNIER (2015) "Can the Provision of Long-Term Liquidity Help to Avoid Credit Crunch?" Evidence from the Eurosystem's LTROs", Working Paper.
  • CROSIGNANI, M., M. FARIA-E-CASTRO, AND L. FONSECA (2015), "Central Bank Interventions, Demand for Collateral, and Sovereign Borrowing Costs", Working Paper
  • TREBESCH, C. AND J. ZETTELMEYER (2014) "ECB Interventions in Distressed Debt Markets: The Case of Greek Bonds", Working Paper.

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
12.04.16
Tuesday
09:30
10:30
ZEW, room 210
20.04.16
Wednesday
09:30
12:30
ZEW, room Strasburg
10.05.16
Tuesday
09:30
12:30
ZEW, room Strasburg
12.05.16
Thursday
09:30
12:30
ZEW, room Strasburg
17.05.16
Tuesday
09:30
12:30
ZEW, room Strasburg
18.05.16
Wednesday
09:30
12:30
ZEW, room Strasburg
01.06.16
Wednesday
09:30
12:30
ZEW, room Strasburg

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: IS903

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course is designed to provide doctoral students across different disciplines a broad introduction to key theories and their application in IS research.The theories originate from a variety of disciplines including management, psychology, communication and sociology. However, an emphasis is given to theories that originated within the IS discipline. The course is designed for both information systems (IS) and non-IS Ph.D. students. Theories about information, technology and information technology are relevant to a number of subjects including, but not limited to, MIS, management, e-business, e-commerce, interactive marketing, accounting, sociology, and psychology. The readings in the course will deepen the students’ understanding of the role of theory in understanding information- related organizational phenomenon and enhance their ability to theorize about information and informations systems related to their own various research themes.

 

Course Objectives

  1. To understand the importance and usefulness of theory in research
  2. To learn the different methods of developing theory
  3. To learn to evaluate theoretical contribution in research
  4. To develop a broad foundation of knowledge of the theories associated with information and IS research on which to build in your own future research
  5. To identify a theory that could be applicable to your own research program

 

Course/Class Organization - Our Approach

This course will be driven by discussion and as such you are expected to come prepared to each class. Each of you should come to class having read and thought about the articles/readings for the week. On the first day of class, each student will volunteer to lead the discussion on one reading of their choice for the remaining sessions (e.g., each student will lead one discussion).

The purpose of the classes is to discuss what you have learnt from the readings - both assigned and otherwise and to clarify points you did not understand. My role (as instructor) will be to ensure that the key points have been identified and understood and to keep the discussion moving.

Normally, there will be around 4 assigned readings per session. In some classes, I will present papers to reduce your reading requirement. There are more readings during the first two sessions to help lay the foundation for the remaining sessions. You are also welcome to mention other articles during our discussions that are not part of the syllabus but contribute to the topic.

You are expected to attend all the classes and be prepared with each reading. Preparation for the readings normally entails making notes in the margins of the paper with your own insights, comments, questions, or suggestions.

 

Course Grade

The grade will be based upon class discussion, upon leading the discussion of one of the articles, and upon a single individual project:

  • Project (the last class session) 1/3rd
  • Class Discussion 1/3rd
  • Discussion Leader 1/3rd

 

Project

The final session is devoted to each student presenting a theory not covered in the class. The idea is threefold: (1) for each student to choose a seminal theory from any discipline (2) for each student to read several papers that have applied or otherwise tested the theory and (3) for each student to suggest how to further advance research using that theory. The presentations will be brief and centered on (1) describing the theory (2) describing how the theory has been applied in research and (3) suggesting ways to apply the research to the student’s own research stream or, alternatively, to IS research more generally. Students are encouraged to choose theories that are directly relevant to their own research and are welcome to present theories that they have already used in their own work.  


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.06.16
Friday
13:15
16:15
L15, 1-6, 7th floor
21.06.16
Tuesday
08:15
11:15
L15, 1-6, 7th floor
23.06.16
Thursday
08:15
11:15
L15, 1-6, 7th floor
24.06.16
Friday
08:15
11:15
L15, 1-6, 7th floor
27.06.16
Monday
08:15
11:15
L15, 1-6, 7th floor
29.06.16
Wednesday
08:15
11:15
L15, 1-6, 7th floor
01.07.16
Friday
08:15
11:15
L15, 1-6, 7th floor

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: IS904

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course provides an overview of qualitative research methods and their application in the field of Information Systems (IS). The course begins with an introduction to the basic principles, epistemological classification and alternatives of conducting qualitative research. It then provides deeper insights into three types of qualitative research, i.e. positivist variance-theoretic, interpretive, and process theoretic. For the interpretive approach, the students are required to summarize and discuss particular research papers and to reflect on how the principles of conducting interpretive research were applied in the respective papers. For this purpose the students are grouped into teams. Overall, the course is designed to be interactive.

 

Grading:

The course will be graded based on three inputs:

 

  • Contributions of the students to class discussions during the sessions
  • Group presentation
  • A written research proposal, which has to be presented in form of a written research-in-progress paper after the course. In this paper, the students are required to elaborate a research proposal in which they show how their own dissertation topic could be examined (either entirely, partly, or complementary) using (at least) one of the discussed qualitative research approaches. Details about the proposal will be provided at the end of the course.

 

Basic Readings:

 

  • Robert K. Yin, Case study research: design and methods, 4th Edition, 2009
  • Miles, M.B., and Huberman, M.A. Qualitative Data Analysis: An Expanded 
Sourcebook. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA, (1994) 


 

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
23.05.16
Monday
15:00
17:30
L15, 1-6, 4th floor
06.06.16
Monday
12:00
13:30
L15, 1-6, 4th floor

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: IS911

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course covers principles and foundations of context-aware computing. Approaches to context acquisition, reasoning and management are presented and current trends in research are discussed.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
L15, 1-6, room 714/715

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN801

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

This seminar will expose participants to the rich ecology of theoretical perspectives flourishing in management research. This will enable students to understand basic concepts, find appropriate theoretical concepts and lenses and apply them properly to their individual research topics. Students are invited to develop creative research proposals worthwhile to be developed into a strong dissertation based upon well grounded theoretical perspectives. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
10.02.16
Wednesday
10:00
13:00
L9, 1-2, room 210
16.03.16
Wednesday
09:00
18:00
L9, 1-2, room 210
13.04.16
Wednesday
10:00
18:00
L9, 1-2, room 210

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN803

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

 


Course Content

This course transmits knowledge about econometric methods and their application in empirical entrepreneurship and management research. Students will be able to understand and apply quantitative methods for analyzing various entrepreneurship and management related research questions, such as entry determinants of entrepreneurship, firm performance, organizational change, human resource management and strategic management. Students will be introduced to the theory and the application of econometric methods (such as advanced regression analyses, structural equation models, and hierarchical linear models) in management and entrepreneurship research. The application will be demonstrated with practical examples and exercises using general purpose software packages such as SPSS, as well as more specialized programs such as AMOS. 

 

Further information 

Please note this course will be held as a block course. 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades 

Students are expected to apply the acquired methodical knowledge and deliver an individual term paper by the end of the semester to demonstrate their ability to analyze an empirical research question. They also have to pass the end-term exam


Competences acquired

By the end of the module students will: 

gain an overview of various quantitative methods, namely 

  • Regression models (generalized linear models) 
  • Factor analysis 
  • Full structural equation models 
  • Hierarchical linear models 
  • Panel and growth curve models and their application in the field of management and entrepreneurship research by using different software packages such as PASW 17, AMOS and SYSTAT 10.
  • master several challenging new themes in the area of entrepreneurship research. 

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
04.03.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
O 326
18.03.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
O 326
08.04.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
O 326

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MAN804

Credits: 8

Course Content

The seminar serves the purpose of familiarizing students with the most relevant research streams and trends in strategy research. Besides a review of the current state-of-the-art, we will engage in a discussion about the most prevalent theoretical lenses, key subject areas and phenomena as well as the empirical designs applied by scholars in these areas. 


Competences acquired

  • Develop an understanding of the most established as well as the latest emerging literature substreams in strategy research 
  • Gain an overview of the most prevalently studied phenomena and subject areas in these literature substreams 
  • Become familiar with the theoretical and methodological approaches used to address the different sets of research questions 
  • Capitalize on a critical reflection of the current state of the literature, to develop a research proposal

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
24.02.16
Wednesday
10:30
12:30
06.04.16
Wedensday
08:30
17:30
L9, 1-2, room 210
07.04.16
Thursday
08:30
17:30

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT802

Credits: 8

Course Content

Learning goals:

 

  • Explore the holistic process of development of marketing thought, theory construction, and theory testing using the structural equation modeling (SEM) framework.
  • Identify and explore potential substantive theoretical contributions to the marketing literature and present these in class.
  • Theory testing and construct validation (measurement properties) using the SEM framework.
  • Provide opportunity to exercise and extend scholarly analytical skills in order to facilitate students’ ability to conduct sound and rigorous academic research.

 

Seminar organization: 

The course will consist of assigned reading material, mini-lectures, student presentations, and discussions. Mini-lectures will be intended to elaborate points that might be difficult to glean from readings and to stimulate discussion. Participants will be responsible for reading and analyzing course readings prior to class, presenting the assigned material, leading discussions on this material, and contributing additional relevant material on topics covered.

The success of the course is heavily dependent on all participants having relatively equal levels of knowledge about each topic. It is critical, therefore, that all participants read the material in advance of each class session. There is a set of reading material distributed prior to class beginning and during the course.

  

Course requirements & evaluation

Students have to complete the following requirements: 

1.     Presentation of readings 50%

 

2.     Presentation of own research 50%

 

Presentation of own research

The presentation should focus on a marketing related phenomenon and must include the development of a theoretical framework. The theoretical framework can be original but should be grounded in, or at least linked to, existing theories and models. Apart from theory construction (constructs, propositions and hypotheses) the participants should also focus on theory testing, construct validation and the underlying empirical research process (research design and data collection). Participants are expected to present in the final session (details for this presentation will be distributed in class)

 

Your grade for the presentation of your own research will depend on:

 

  • your ability to deliver a targeted presentation of the theoretical framework in question and a review of the literature;
  • your ability to bring in your interpretation of the literature relative to the relevant theoretical framework;
  • your ability to the derive testable propositions and/or hypotheses on the basis of the constructs included in the theoretical framework;
  • your ability to develop the underlying empirical research process (research design and data collection)
  • your ability to design the appropriate measures for the constructs (construct validity) and propose analytical approaches to assess their measurement properties;
  • the quality of the classroom experience for the other students.

 

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.16
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
Roche Forum
07.03.16
Monday
09:00
16:30
Roche Forum
08.03.16
Tuesday
09:00
16:30
SO 318
21.04.16
Thursday
09:00
16:30
Roche Forum

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT803

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course takes an “information processing” perspective to examine Consumer Behavior. The key focus will be to examine how consumers process marketing stimuli and make decisions. This includes topics such as motivation and involvement, attention and comprehension, memory, attitudes and attitude change, and decision making models. In each session, the Professor will provide a brief overview of the topic. Then, both classic and current papers on these topics will be discussed. Students will be expected to read assigned articles prior to class and be prepared to discuss them.

Course objective

This goal of this course is to provide insights into research and content issues in Consumer Behavior. Students will read key research papers on important topics and critically evaluate the studies.

 

Course schedule, topics, and reading assignments

1. May 9: Consumer Information Processing Martin(2012), Raghunathan, Walker-Naylor, & Hoyer (2006)

2. May 10: Low Involvement/Unconscious Processing Broniarczyk, Hoyer, & McAlister (1998), van Kerckhove, Geuens, & Vermeir (2015)

3. May 11: Information Search Huang, Lurie, & Mitra (2009), Moore (2015)

4. May 17: Decision Making Simonson & Sela (2011), Mehta, Hoegg, & Chakravarti (2010)

5. May 18: Attitudes and Persuasion Shu & Carlson (2014), Dahl, Sengupta, & Vohs (2009)

6. May 20: Affect and Heuristics Malaer, Krohmer, Hoyer, & Nyffenegger (2011), Mogilner, Aaker, & Kamvar (2012)

  

Students will get the articles by E-Mail after the registration for the course is finished.

 

Evaluation of articles and paper presentation

When reading each of the articles, you should think about and be prepared to discuss the following. Is important to identify both the strengths and weaknesses of the paper (i.e., this is not an exercise meant to just attack papers; rather, much can be learned by identifying what is good about a paper as well).

1. Do the authors motivate the topic adequately (i.e., why is it interesting and important)? What are the research gaps?

2. What are the theoretical foundations for hypotheses or arguments made? Is there strong support for the authors’ arguments?

3. Is there logic, internal consistency, and a strong linkage between theory and hypotheses or arguments?

4. Are the hypotheses interesting and testable or falsifiable (i.e., ability of design to eliminate alternative hypotheses or competing theoretical explanations)?

5. What is the originality of the contribution to the extant body of knowledge in discipline (i.e., what do we learn that is new?)?

6. Are the research methods employed to test hypotheses and measure key constructs strong in terms of internal and external validity?

7. Are the data analyzed and reported accurately?

8. What are the key implications of the findings for understanding consumer behavior and marketing?

 

Research Proposal

Each student is expected to write a research proposal within one of the major topic areas. The paper should be more than merely a literature review. It should develop an area in which research is needed and then proceed to develop a specific research topic including hypotheses, a proposed methodology, and an analysis plan. The paper should be a maximum of 20 double-spaced pages in length (including all exhibits and references) and has to be prepared by the end of the semester.

 

Course evaluation

Paper presentation (25%), class participation (25%), and the research proposal (50%).

 

Contact person 

The contact person for this course is Dr. Christina Kühnl (ckuehnl@mail.uni-mannheim.de).


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
09.05.16
Monday
15:30
18:00
Roche Forum, L 5, 1, ground floor
10.05.16
Tuesday
09:00
12:00
Roche Forum, L 5, 1, ground floor
11.05.16
Wednesday
09:00
12:00
Roche Forum, L 5, 1, ground floor
11.05.16
Wednesday
09:00
12:00
Roche Forum, L 5, 1, ground floor
17.05.16
Tuesday
09:00
12:00
Roche Forum, L 5, 1, ground floor
18.05.16
Wednesday
09:00
12:00
Roche Forum, L 5, 1, ground floor
20.05.16
Friday
13:45
16:45
Roche Forum, L 5, 1, ground floor

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: MKT902

Credits: 8

Course Content

The primary goal of Advances in Marketing Research is to help students prepare to conduct research which is publishable in the leading research journals in their respective disciplines. Hence, the feedback students receive will be consistent with that dispensed by the reviewers and editors of the most prestigious research journals in business (i.e., highly critical). Even when a manuscript is accepted for publication at a leading journal, the authors typically receive mostly negative comments on their work. It is important that students not take criticism of their research personally. To do so would be extremely ego deflating and would interfere with their subsequent performance on other assignments. Moreover, students need to develop the ability to accept and use criticism to be able to survive in the academic publishing world. 

Advances in Marketing Research is designed to assist doctoral candidates in acquiring a deeper understanding of the research process and a knowledge of the research tools which they will need to design and execute scientific research on behavioral and organizational issues in marketing. An effort is made to help the students develop research judgment as well as research skills so that they will be better able to assess when a proposed piece of research is likely to be fruitful and when it is not.

Further information can be found on the Chair's website: kraus.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/89.html

Literature 

  • Donald T. Campbell and Julian C. Stanley, Experimental and Quasi-experimental Design for Research, Chicago: Rand McNally, 1963. 
  • Thomas D. Cook and Donald T. Campbell, Quasi-Experimentation: Design and Analysis Issues for Field Settings, Chicago: Rand McNally, 1979. 
  • Selected articles to be distributed prior to each session. 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades 

  • Grading is based on paper presentations and class participation during the course including summaries and critiques (20%), an final exam at the end of the course (30%), and the independent research reports (oral and written) (50%). 
  • Paper Presentations and Class Participation: You will repeatedly be asked to make 20-30 minute presentations of assigned papers and to contribute to specific questions in class. Therefore you will have to prepare to lead a discussion on a particular article or topic. Furthermore, it is expected that every student will be prepared to knowledgeably discuss assigned reading materials each class meeting. The class participation grade will be determined in part by contributions to class discussions and prepared presentation performances. 
  • Final Exam: There will be a final examination. The exam will be comprehensive, covering all materials assigned and discussed during the course. 
  • Independent Research Report (IRP): Each student will prepare and present to the class a 15-20 page typewritten, double-spaced IRP. This IRP is the partial design of a study which represents an extension/improvement of an existing empirical study. The topic of the IRP will be determined by each student with the professor's approval. Each IRP will be copied and distributed to all class members. All IRPs will be presented in one of the last session of this course. 

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
19.02.16
03.06.16
Friday
10:15
13:30
L9, 1-2, 009


Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM802

Credits: 8

Course Content

The course introduces some fundamental techniques for stochastic modelling and optimization, and it discusses their application in supply chain research. Key topics include: 

  • stochastic processes 
  • Markov chains 
  • stochastic dynamic programming 
  • inventory theory 
  • revenue management 

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
SO 318

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM806

Credits: 8

Course Content

A large part of research in operations management focusses on modeling and solving practical problems. In contrast to this “OR approach”, the objective of empirical research is to collect data about practical phenomena in order to describe, explain, or predict how those phenomena work. This module provides an overview of (mainly quantitative) empirical research approaches to investigate research questions in operations management and related fields. The focus in not on the comprehensive treatment of empirical research methods, but on how to proceed from having a basic research question to an appropriate research design and methodology. Hence, special emphasis will be placed on the importance of understanding the contingent relationship between the nature of the research question and the research design used to answer it. Topics covered include quantitative vs. qualitative empirical research, framing of research questions, engaging theory and grounding of hypotheses, measurement and operationalization, sampling, model specification, and mainstream research designs and methodologies. This will enable students to critically evaluate the quality of the majority of empirical research in operations management and to design convincing research of their own.

The course will be taught using an interactive seminar style and is based on the discussion of a selection of papers.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
22.04.16
Friday
08:30
13:30
SO 322
29.04.16
Friday
08:30
13:30
SO 318
20.05.16
Friday
08:30
13:30
SO 318
27.05.16
Friday
08:30
13:30
SO 318


Course Type: core course

Course Number: OPM901

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

OPM 801 and OPM 802

 


Course Content

The seminar series is supposed to be a regular meeting for members of the Area Operations Management, the Chair of Business Mathematics, and others. The focus is on presenting and discussing

  • ideas for further research
  • intermediate reports regarding ongoing projects, and 
  • recent final results.

The seminar's designated target is to establish a discussion platform, to increase awareness of research conducted in the areas. Topics of presentations may cover all aspects being relevant in the field of Operations Management & Operations Research. All members of the areas are highly encouraged to contribute by presenting their work.


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades:

  • Presentations during the course (50%)
  • writing referee report (30%)
  • active contribution to class discussion (20%)

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
25.02.16
19.05.16
Thursday
12:00
13:30
SO 318

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: OPM918

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Prerequisites: OPM 901 – Research Seminar in Operations Management and Operations Research


Course Content

Aim of module: This elective course aims at PhD students in information systems, business administration, and computer science. The course is taught in a seminar-style format. 

Each student gives three presentation about one own research topics to discuss and sharpen the contribution of that work. The presentations are structured similar to papers in that field:

 

  1. Problem description, Model formulation, and contribution to scientific literature
  2. Solution Method
  3. Data analysis and numerical study

 

Students act as discussants to presentations of other students. At the end of the seminar students hand in a draft of the paper, which reflects the discussion to each single point.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to structure and discuss their own research results for a presentation and in a paper. They will become acquainted with acting as discussant for other topics. They will learn how to identify and sharpen the contributions of their own work. They learn how to present the analysis of data and how to design numerical studies.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
SO 322
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
SO 322
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
10:15
11:45
SO 322


Course Type: core course

Course Number: TAX801

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course integrates tax law with tax planning in a national and an international environment. 

The main topics include: 

  • Fundamentals of Tax Planning and Tax Neutrality 
  • The Choice of the Organisational Form 
  • Flat Tax and Dual Income Tax 
  • International Tax Planning 
  • Effective Tax Rates 

The course gives guidance to those students who are interested in research on the impact of taxes on investment and financing decisions as well as on location decisions. 

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades 

  • Seminar paper
  • Presentation

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
19.02.16
03.06.16
Friday
08:30
11:45
SO 133

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: TAX902

Credits: 7

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
SO 133
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
12:00
13:30
L9, 1-2, room 009

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: TAX913

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course gives an introduction to the main subjects and methodologies of empirical taxation research. Important landmark papers as well as contributions from the current research frontier will be discussed. If the relevant data is available, students get the chance to understand the empirical approach in practice in the computer lab. Following topics may be included:

  • Tax incidence
  • Tax efficiency
  • Taxes in the context of mergers and acquisition
  • Taxation of multinationals
  • Tax avoidance and tax evasion
  • Capital taxation
  • Labor taxation

The course should enable participants to identify gaps in the existing literature and to evaluate the potential of new research ideas. As a primary objective, the course supports students in developing their empirical research projects. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
13:45
15:15
L9, 1-2, room 409
25.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
10:15
11:45
L9, 1-2, room 409

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: TAX917

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course covers empirical methods which were not part of the Applied Econometrics I module. Potential topics are determined according to demand and may include limited dependent variable regressions (binary, multinomial, sample selection, count data), matching estimators, quantile regressions and programming. Grading is based on presentations, empirical assignments and participation. 

 

Further information 

The course will take place on two out of the three mentioned dates per week - depending on the availability of the participants.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
L9, 1-2, room 409
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
13:45
15:15
O 048

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: TAX919

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of national and international tax law.


Course Content

This course integrates international tax law with specific tax planning tools of multinational companies.

The main topics include:

•   Fundamentals of International Tax Law (Domestic and Treaty)

•   International tax planning techniques and mechanisms

•   Fundamental flaws in the International Tax System

•   The OECD’s Base Erosion Profit Shifting project and the future of the International Tax System

The course gives guidance to those students who are interested in research on normative issues on international taxation and relevant tax planning issues resulting from different allocation rules for international income. Over the past few years the OECD has lead a “once in a generation” review of the international tax system. This course also critically examines the proposals resulting from this review and considers the future of the international tax system.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
03.05.16
Tuesday
08:30
17:00
O 126
04.05.16
Wednesday
08:00
17:00
SO 422
01.06.16
Wednesday
14:00
20:00
L9, 7, 308


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: ACC/TAX911

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course aims at students in accounting and taxation. The course is taught in a seminar-style format. Students present their own research and discuss the presentations of other students. Students are introduced in writing referee reports to (drafts of) papers. Allocation of topics will be determined in class.
Students will learn how to present and discuss their own research results. They will become acquainted with acting as discussant for other topics. Additionally, they will learn how to write a referee report.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
23.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
13:45
15:15

Register

Business Spring 2016

ACC802
Analytical Research in Accounting
ACC902
Normative Accounting Research
ACC903
Empirical Accounting Research I (Research Methods)
ACC/TAX911
Brown Bag Seminar Empirical Accounting & Taxation
ACC904
Empirical Accounting Research II (Causal Inference)
FIN802
Continuous-Time Finance
FIN803
Corporate Finance
FIN804
Econometrics of Financial Markets
FIN901
Behavioral Finance
FIN911
Current Research Topics in Finance
FIN913
Advanced Quantitative Risk Management
FIN921
Workshop in Macro-Finance
FIN922
Sovereign and Financial Sector Credit Risk
IS903
Information Systems Theories
IS904
Qualitative Research Methods in Information Systems
IS911
Context-Aware Computing
MAN801
Advances in Entrepreneurship and Organization Research
MAN803
Applied Econometrics in Management Research
MAN804
Advances in Strategic Management
MKT802
Marketing Theories
MKT803
Consumer Behavior
MKT902
Advances in Marketing Research
OPM802
Dynamic and Stochastic Models in Supply Chain Research
OPM806
Empirical Research in Operations Management
OPM901
Operations Management and Operations Research
OPM918
Business Analytics
TAX801
Business Taxation
TAX902
Public Economics
TAX913
Empirical Taxation Research
TAX917
Applied Econometrics II
TAX919
International Tax Law