BE INSPIRED

"To be able to conduct high-quality quantitative and qualitative research, the CDSE offers a wide range of methodological courses that prepare you well for this purpose." Sihong Zhang and Katharina Momsen, CDSE

Course Catalogue

Fall 2017

Economics


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E700

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Basic mathematical knowledge


Course Content

The course consists of four chapters:

  • Chapter 1: basic mathematical concepts like sets, functions and relations are introduced and discussed. Strict mathematical reasoning is explained and applied.
  • Chapter 2: covers the concept of metric and normed spaces and discusses the convergence of sequences in these spaces, the continuity of functions, and the concept of compact sets.
  • Chapter 3: deal with vector spaces. matrix algebra, linear transformation, and eigenvalues of matrices.
  • Chapter 4: covers a multivariate concept of differentiability and its application in solving unconstraint and constrained optimization problems.

 

For more detailed information about the first sessions of this course, click here.

 

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades:

  • Exam (120 min)

Competences acquired

The students know basic mathematical concepts of analysis and linear algebra. They can interpret mathematical formulas that are written in the condensed mathematical syntax. The students understand the concept of a proof and can develop rigorous mathematical proofs in a elementary level. They understand abstract mathematical concepts like metric spaces and linear spaces and are able to comprehend argumentation on basis of abstract mathematical concepts. They are able to apply their knowledge; especially they are familiar with the calculation of limits and derivatives, the methods of linear algebra, and they can solve nonlinear optimization problems. The students are able to communicate their mathematical knowledge in English.

 

Teaching Assistants:

Daria Khromenkova (CDSE)

Exercise Groups 1 + 2

 

Sebastian Merkel (CDSE)

Exercise Groups 3 + 4


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
04.09.17
Monday
10:15
11:45
Room C012, Building A5, 6
05.09.17
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
Room C012, Building A5, 6
06.09.17
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
Room C012, Building A5, 6
07.09.17
Thursday
10:15
11:45
Room C012, Building A5, 6
Final Exam Date
05.10.17
Thursday
17:15
19:15
Room C013, Building A5, 6
Retake
14.12.17
Thursday
17:15
19:15
C012 in A5,6 Bauteil C
Tutorial
Exercise Group 1
04.09.17
25.09.17
Monday
13:45
15:15
Room A302, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 3
04.09.17
25.09.17
Monday
13:45
15:15
Room A303, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 2
04.09.17
25.09.17
Monday
15:30
17:00
Room A302, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 4
04.09.17
25.09.17
Monday
15:30
17:00
Room A303, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 1
05.09.17
26.09.17
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
Room A302, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 3
05.09.17
26.09.17
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
Room A303, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 2
05.09.17
26.09.17
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
Room A302, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 4
05.09.17
26.09.17
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
Room A303, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 1
06.09.17
27.09.17
Wednesday
13:45
15:15
Room A301, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 3
06.09.17
27.09.17
Wednesday
13:45
15:15
Room A303, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 2
06.09.17
27.09.17
Wednesday
15:30
17:00
Room A302, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 4
06.09.17
27.09.17
Wednesday
15:30
17:00
Room A303, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 1
07.09.17
28.09.17
Thursday
13:45
15:15
Room A302, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 3
07.09.17
28.09.17
Thursday
13:45
15:15
Room A303, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 2
07.09.17
28.09.17
Thursday
15:30
17:00
Room A302, Building B6, 23-25
Exercise Group 4
07.09.17
28.09.17
Thursday
15:30
17:00
Room A303, Building B6, 23-25

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E701

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

E700


Course Content

The course gives a foundation for studies for microeconomics at the PhD level. The first part is devoted to consumer and producer theory. It is organized as follows:

 

1. Choice, preference and utility

2. Structural properties of preferences and utility functions

3. Basics of consumer demand

4. Expenditure minimization

5. Classical demand theory

6. Competitive and profit-maximizing firms

7. Consumer and producer surplus

8. Choice under uncertainty

9. Utility for money

 

The second part covers game theory and is organized as follows:

10. Static games of complete information: Rationalizability and iterated strict dominance

11. Static games of complete information: Nash equilibrium

12. Static games of incomplete information

13. Dynamic games: The extensive form

14. Dynamic games: Equilibrium concepts

 

Teaching method

Lecture (3 SWS), Exercise (1.5 SWS)

 

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • Written exam: 120 min (90% weighting)
  • Exercises (10% weighting)

 

Literature

Recommended textbooks:

  • Fudenberg, D & Tirole, J. (1991). Game Theory. MIT Press
  • Kreps, D. (2012). Microeconomic Foundation 1: Choice and Competitive Markets. Princeton University Press.
  • Mas- Colell, A. Whinston, M.D. & Green, J. (1995). Microeconomic Theory. Oxford University Press.
  • Osborne M. and Rubinstein, A. (1994): A Course in Game Theory. MIT Press

Competences acquired

 

Students learn the basic tools for graduate level microeconomic analysis. The concepts learned in the course serve as building blocks for more advanced topics such as the ones studied in Advanced Microeconomics 2 and 3 and also for macroeconomics and empirical studies. Students also learn using rigorous formal proofs for microeconomic questions.

 

Teaching Assistant:

Larionov


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
09.10.17
06.12.17
Monday
10:15
11:45
Room 001, Building L7, 3-5 (tbc)
09.10.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
Room 001, Building L7, 3-5 (tbc)
Single Date
03.11.17
Friday
12:00
13:30
SO 318, Schneckenhof Ost
Written Exam
20.12.17
WED
08:30
10:30
L7, 3-5, 001
Retake
29.01.18
Monday
10:15
12:15
room 212/213, B6, 30-32
Tutorial
Exercise Group 1
09.10.17
06.12.17
Monday
12:00
13:30
Room 001, Building L7, 3-5
Exercise Group 2
09.10.17
06.12.17
Monday
13:45
15:15
Room 001, Building L7, 3-5


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E702

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

E700.


Course Content

This course provides an introduction to the foundations of modern macroeconomic analysis. The main object of this course is structural dynamic models where households' preference, firms' technology, and market structure are explicitly specified. The behaviors of agents in the model economy are derived based on microeconomic foundations. The macroeconomic aggregates are then determined by aggregating individuals' micro-founded decisions. We will consider some applications as well.

Teaching Method

Lecture (3 SWS), Exercise (1.5 SWS)

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

  • Problem sets (30 points)
  • Midterm exam (40 points)
  • Final exam (60 points) 

Literature/Textbooks:

  • Ljungqvist, L. Sargent, T.J. (2004). Recursive Macroeconomic Theory. MIT Press.
  • Prescott, E.C. Lucas, R.E. Stokey, N.L. (1989). Recursive Methods in Economic Dynamics. Harvard University Press.

Competences acquired

At the end of the lectures, students are expected to be familiar with the basic methodology such as recursive methods and dynamic programming as well as several basic macroeconomic models.

Teaching Assistant:

Niklas Garnadt (CDSE)


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
09.10.17
06.12.17
Monday
17:15
18:45
Room S031, Building L7, 3-5
09.10.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
17:15
18:45
Room S031, Building L7, 3-5
Written Exam
13.12.17
09:00
11:00
L7, 3-5, 001
Retake
16.01.18
Tuesday
10:15
12:15
room 212/213 in B6, 30-32
Tutorial
Exercise Group 1
09.10.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
13:45
15:15
Room P043, Building L7, 3-5
Exercise Group 2
09.10.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
15:30
17:00
Room P044, Building L7, 3-5


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E703

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

E700.


Course Content

The goal of the module is to offer advanced treatment to econometric theory and to serve as the gateway to further advanced theoretical and applied econometric modules offered in the economics graduate program at the Department of Economics in Mannheim. In the module an introduction will be given to the probabilistic framework of econometric theory.

In the first part, basic notions of probability theory with their measure theoretical background are explained: probability measure, random variables, expectations, conditional expectations, notions of convergence and basic limit theorems.

The second part will be devoted to the formal derivation of theoretical foundations of linear regression models. The theory of the first part is then applied to obtain asymptotic properties of parameter estimators and to set up statistical tests in this framework.

The module gives training in the use of mathematical arguments in the theory of asymptotic econometrics.

 

Teaching Method

Lecture (4 SWS), Tutorial (2 SWS)

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

  • written exam, 120 min
  • regular attendance required

 

Literature

Recommended textbooks

  • Hayashi, F. (2000). Econometrics. Princeton University Press.
  • Jacod, J. and Protter, P. (2000). Probability Essentials. Springer.

Competences acquired

On successful completion of the module, students are expected to attain the following competences:

  • Attain advanced theoretical knowledge in econometrics in the specific topics the module covers.
  • Be familiar with current theories and recent developments in the specific topics of focus for the module.
  • Attain a higher/advanced level of analytical capability.
  • Attain knowledge in the probabilistic background of advanced theoretical econometrics.
  • Be in a position to take on follow-up advanced theoretical and applied econometrics modules.
  • Attain the level of competence that permits independent undertakings in search of new knowledge in the specialist areas the module covers.
  • Attain the level of competence required to carry out (theoretical) research-oriented projects independently.
  • To be in a position to exchange information, ideas, and solutions with experts of the field on a scientific level as well as with laymen.
  • To be able to communicate and to work effectively and efficiently with people and in groups.
  • Graduates are able to communicate precisely in the English specialist language.

 

Teaching Assistant:

Majed Dodin (CDSE)


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
10.10.17
07.12.17
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
Room 001, Building L7, 3-5 (tbc)
10.10.17
07.12.17
Thursday
10:15
11:45
Room 001, Building L7, 3-5 (tbc)
written exam
21.12.17
Thursday
08:30
10:30
L7, 3-5, 001
Retake
22.01.18
Monday
10:15
12:15
room 212/213 in B6, 30-32
Tutorial
Exercise Group 1
10.10.17
05.12.17
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
Room P 043, Building L7, 3-5
Exercise Group 2
10.10.17
05.12.17
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
Room P 043, Building L7, 3-5

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: E800

Credits: 12

Prerequisites

2nd and higher year Ph.D. students from the Center for Doctoral Studies in Economics (CDSE)

2nd year students from the Master of Economic Research


Course Content

Method (hours per week): Colloquium (2 h)

Duration of the module: 4 semesters

ECTs awarded after each semester: 3 ECTs


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
12.09.17
05.12.17
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
Room P 044, Building L7, 3-5

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E8002

Credits: 7

Prerequisites

E700-E703, E801-E806


Course Content

The analysis of different non-standard data types has a long history in applied and theoretical Microeconometrics. Thiscourse will provide an introduction to the analysis of duration, count, and “censored regression” data focusing in particular onidentification, estimation, and implementation related issues. The first part of the course will mainly deal with different durationmodels, sampling schemes, censoring, unobserved heterogeneity, and treatment analysis in the duration context. The secondpart of the course will focus on count data and censored regression (e.g., Tobit) models dealing also with topics such assample selection, truncation, etc..

 

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

written exam (90 mins) (20%) + short presentation on a research paper (20%)


Competences acquired

By the end of the course, students (i) should have a solid understanding of the key concepts of duration, count data, censoredregression analysis and of related topics, (ii) should have acquired the mathematical tools, the empirical skills, and thenecessary vocabulary to understand and to analyze theoretical and empirical questions in this context, and (iii) should be ableto provide scientifically sound solutions and answers to these questions.

 

Literature:

Cameron and Trivedi (2005): “Microeconometrics – Methods and Applications”; Chs. 16-20.

Wooldridge (2010): “Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data”; Chs. 17-20,22.

Lancaster (1990): “The Econometric Analysis of Transition Data”.

Winkelmann (2008): “The Econometric Analysis of Count Data”.

Various Research Papers (specified in class)


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Lecture and exercise
04.09.17
07.12.17
Monday
10:15
11:45
Room P 043, Building L7, 3-5
Exam
11.12.17
10:15
11:45
room 003; L9, 1-2
Tutorial
each second week
04.09.17
07.12.17
Thursday
10:15
11:45
Room P 043, Building L7, 3-5

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E8004

Credits: 2.5

Prerequisites

First-year sequence in the Economics PhD program.

 

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades:

Presentations


Course Content

Students will read, present and discuss papers in environmental economics.


Competences acquired

  • Presentation skills
  • Participation in scientific discourse
  • Absorption of recent research in environmental economics
  • Acquisition of a reading routine

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
13.09.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
17:15
18:45
Room 410, Building L7, 3-5 (tbc)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E8010

Credits: 5

Course Content

Internal and external speakers discuss current research topics in econometrics.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
07.09.17
07.12.17
Thursday
15:30
17:00
Room 002, Building L9, 1-2

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E8011

Credits: 7.5

Prerequisites

Prerequisites:

E700-E703

E801-E806


Course Content

This course covers structural vector autoregressive (SVAR) models. These models are widely used for empirical research in macroeconomics and finance. We will discuss the underlying econometric theory (estimation; identification using short-run, long-run, sign, and heteroskedasticity restrictions, external instruments, and high-frequency data; frequentist and Bayesian inference), tools (such as forecast error variance decomposition, historical decomposition, policy counterfactuals), and empirical research using SVAR models (e.g., to identify the effects of monetary policy shocks, fiscal expenditure shocks, and oil price shocks). If time permits, we will compare SVAR models with estimated dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models and discuss factor VAR models, non-linear VAR models, and non-fundamental shocks.

Teaching Method:

Lecture (2 SWS) and Exercise (1 SWS)

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades:

A research paper and/or regular assignments.

Literature:

Recommended textbooks:

Kilian and Lütkepohl (Structural Vector Autoregressive Analysis, preliminary: see www-personal.umich.edu/~lkilian/book.html)

Lütkepohl (New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, 2005)


Competences acquired

The course introduces students to the econometric theory and macroeconomic applications of structural vector autoregressions.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Single Date
07.09.17
Thursday
17:15
18:45
Room 001, Building L9, 1-2
12.09.17
05.12.17
Tuesday
15:30
17:00
Room 002, Building L9, 1-2


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E8012

Credits: 5

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
26.10.17
07.12.17
Thursday
15:30
17:00
Room 410, Building L7, 3-5

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E820

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

E700-E703, E801-E806.

Very successful mastery of the econometrics courses.


Course Content

The seminar (formerly Theoretical Microeconometrics) prepares for own research in theoretical econometrics. This seminar covers recent developments in microeconometrics with a particular focus on identification and estimation strategies that deal with endogeneity issues. Preference will be given to articles in Econometrica, recently published or forthcoming.

 

Requirement for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

Presentations and seminar paper.


Competences acquired

On successful completion of the module, students are expected to attain the following competences:

  • Attain advanced knowledge in econometric theory.
  • Attain a higher/advanced level of analytical capability.
  • To be in a position to exchange information, ideas, and solutions with experts of the field on a scientific level as well as with laymen.
  • Ability to communicate precisely in the English specialist language.
  • Presentation skills.
  • Attain the level of competence that permits independent undertakings in search of new knowledge in microeconometric theory.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
Room 009, L9, 1-2

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E839

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

First and second year PhD courses.


Course Content

The seminar discusses recent research projects in the field of macroeconomics on a weekly basis. In addition to Ph.D. students and professors from the University of Mannheim, scholars from other universities and institutions present their work.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
07.09.17
07.12.17
Thursday
12:15
13:15
Room 003, Building L9, 1-2

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E841

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

All first-year PhD courses.


Course Content

PhD-level course of the modern theory of industrial organization. Topics include monopoly pricing, static and dynamic oligopoly, collusion, mergers, industry dynamics, vertical relations.

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

Written exam (100%)


Competences acquired

Acquisition of a deep understanding of the key topics, seminal models, and frontiers of research in theoretical industrial organization.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.10.17
05.12.17
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
Room 308, Building L9, 7
17.10.17
05.12.17
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
Room 308, Building L9, 7


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E846

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

E700-E703, E801-E806.


Course Content

This seminar is aimed at PhD students writing their dissertation in Industrial Organization. It is intended to guide students at all stages of dissertation research. The emphasis be on presentation and discussion of material by students.

 

Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

Presentation (100%).


Competences acquired

Doctoral Students will know how to

  • identify a research question,
  • put a research question into context of the relevant literature,
  • present their current stage of research to their peers in a seminar environment.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
Room 002, Building L9, 1-2

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E864

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

E700-E703, E801-E806 or equivalent.


Course Content

This graduate course brings together the latest research ideas and topics in public economics and political economy. The focus will be primarily on theoretical work. The course will consist of two parts. The first part will cover topics in public economics. The second part will address political economy issues.

 

Part I: Advances in Public Economics

1. Theory of Public Goods

  • Classics: Efficient public-goods provision according to the Samuelson Rule, public goods as a source of market failure, Lindahl’s approach
  • The modern theory: public-good provision under asymmetric information

2. Theory of optimal income taxation

  • Mechanism Design and Income Taxation
  • Private information and the welfare theorems
  • The optimal utilitarian income tax

Part II: Advances in Political Economy

1. Political Behavior

  • Voters, Candidates, Legislatures, Interest Groups, Political Parties, Media

2. Political Distortions

  • Inefficient redistribution, Career concerns, Dynamic Problems

3. Endogenous Political Institutions


Competences acquired

The course introduces the latest research ideas and topics in public economics and political economy. The course should prove useful for any student interested in analyzing policy issues. It will be particularly valuable background for those students intending to specialize in public economics and political economy. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
05.09.17
05.12.17
Tuesday
08:30
10:00
TBA

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E873

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

E700-E703, E801-E806


Course Content

"Research Seminar in Public Economics"

Students get the credits for this course if they give a presentation at least once during the semester and participate in the discussion of the other seminar presentations


Competences acquired

Develop own research agenda, execution of research projects, presentation of own research results.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
04.09.17
04.12.17
Monday
15:30
17:00
Room P 043, Building L7, 3-5


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E887

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

E700-E703, E801-E806.


Course Content

The main goal of the course is to help students acquire important skills for being an applied researcher. We will read and discuss applied micro papers (with a particular focus on papers in development economics) and students will practice presenting papers and own research ideas. Most importantly the course should facilitate the process of generating research ideas and formulating them in a research proposal and teaches a selection of methods and tools necessary to write applied micro papers. In terms of econometric methods, we will discuss the problem of identifying causal effects (Rubin’s causal model) and potential solutions: from randomized experiments, over the matching approach, difference-in-difference approach (DID), regression discontinuity approach (RDD), instrumental variable approach (IV) and local IV to more structural approaches. The course addresses a select list of topics and I will teach a few papers in detail instead of providing a complete overview of the literature. Several of the papers have been chosen to teach empirical methods and show how they are applied in empirical work. Another part of the course is on new survey methods such as measuring people’s expectations and preferences, for example by conducting lab experiments in the field. The goal is to show how new survey (measurement) methods can be used to improve our understanding of human behavior.

 

Course Outline

- Health, Education and Program Evaluation Methods

  1. Program Evaluation Methods: Theory
  2. Applications: Health Policies and Returns to Health A
  3. Applications: Education Policies and Returns to Education
  4. Methodological Discussion (Structural vs reduced-form approached)

- New Survey Methods: Measuring Expectations and Preferences

  1. Measuring People’s Expectations
  2. Measuring People’s Preferences

- Social and Intergenerational Mobility and Peer Effects

  1. Social Mobility, Intergenerational Correlations and Nature versus Nurture
  2. Peer Effects, Information and Social Learning

- Intra-Household Decision-Making and Gender Differences

 

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

  • (50%) Research proposal. You are required to hand in an initial proposal of 3-5 pages in the middle of the semester, that describes the research question, motivates its importance, and proposes how you will answer it (identification strategy and description of potential data sets). I will give you comments and a newer version that further develops your idea is due at the end of the course.
  • (20%) Paper Presentation: The exact format will depend on class size. Tentatively, each student will prepare a 30 minute presentation and lead a class discussion.
  • (20%) Presentation of your own research idea: At the end of the course, you are asked to present your own research idea in class.
  • (10%) Class-room participation.

 

Further information

List of papers that will either be discussed in class or from which you can choose your class presentation:

  • Abadie A. (2005) ”Semiparametric difference-in-differences estimators”, Review of Economic Studies, vol. 72.
  • Angelucci, M. and De Giorgi, G. (2009) ”Indirect Effects of an Aid Program: How Do Cash Transfers Affect Ineligibles’ Consumption?,” American Economic Review, 99(1), 486-508.
  • Attanasio, O. (2010) ”Expectations in Developing countries” , American Economic Review, papers and proceedings.
  • Attanasio, O. and Kaufmann, K.M. (forthcoming) ”Educational Choices and Subjective Expectations of Returns: Evidence on Intra-Household Decision Making and Gender Differences”, Working Paper.
  • Attanasio, O., Meghir, C. and Szekely, M. (2003) ”Using Randomized Experiments and Structural Models for Scaling-Up: Evidence from the Progresa Evaluation”, IFS Working Paper, EWP03/05.
  • Angrist, J., Imbens, G. and Rubin (1996) ”Identification of Causal Effects Using Instrumental Variables”, JASA, 91, 444-472
  • Angrist, J. and Lavy, V. (1999) ”Using Maimonides Rule to Estimate the Effect of Class Size on Scholastic Achievement”, Quarterly Journal of Economics.
  • Banerjee, A. and Duflo, E. (2008) ”The Experimental Approach to Development Economics”, unpublished manuscript.
  • Behrman, J. and Rosenzweig M. R. (2002) ”Does Increasing Women’s Schooling Raise the Schooling of the Next Generation?”, American Economic Review, vol. 92 (1).
  • Berry, J. (2009) ”Child Control in Education Decisions: An Evaluation of Targeted Incentives to Learn in India”, mimeo, MIT.
  • Bertrand, M.; Duflo, E.; and Mullainathan (2004) ”How much should we trust differences-indifferences estimates?”, QJE, 119(1), 249-75.
  • Binswanger, H.P. (1981) ”Attitudes towards Risk: Theoretical implications of an experiment in rural India”, Economic Journal 91(364).
  • Bjoerklund, A., Lindahl, M. and Plug, E. (2006) ”The Origins of Intergenerational Correlations: Lessons from Swedish Adoption Data”, Quarterly Journal of Economics.
  • Bobonis, G. and Finan, F. (2009) ”Neighborhood Peer Effects in Secondary School Enrollment Decisions” Review of Economics and Statistics, 91(4), 695-716.
  • Bramoulle, Y., Djebbari, H. and Fortin, B. (2009) ”Identification of peer effects through social networks”, Journal of Econometrics, Volume 150(1), 41-55.
  • Carneiro, P., Heckman, J. J.and Vytlacil, E. (2005) ”Understanding what IV Estimate: Estimating Marginal and Average Returns to Education”.
  • Deaton, A. (2010) ”Instruments, Randomization, and Learning about Development”, Journal of Economic Literature, Vol 48.
  • De Paula, Shapira, Todd (2009) ”How Beliefs about HIV Status Affect Risky Behaviors: Evidence from Malawi”, PIER WP.
  • Delavande, A. and Kohler, H.P.(2009) ”Subjective Expectations in the Context of HIV/AIDS in Malawi”, Demographic Research, Vol 20.
  • Delavande, A., Gine, X. and McKenzie, D. (2009) ”Measuring Subjective Expectations in Developing Countries: A Critical Review and New Evidence”, Journal of Development Economics.
  • Ding, W. and Lehrer, S. (2006) ”Do Peers Affect Student Achievement in China’s Secondary Schools?”, Working Paper.
  • Duflo, E. (2001) ”Schooling and Labor Market Consequences of School Construction in Indonesia: Evidence from an Unusual Policy Experiment”, American Economic Review, 91(4).
  • Duflo, E., Dupas, P. and Kremer, M. (2010) ”Peer Effects and the Impacts of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya”, American Economic Review.
  • Duflo, E. (2003), ”Grandmothers and Granddaughters: Old-Age Pensions and Intrahousehold Allocation”, World Bank Economic Review, 17, 1-25.
  • Duflo, E. and Udry, C. (2004) ”Intrahousehold Resource Allocation in Cte d’Ivoire: Social Norms, Separate Accounts and Consumption Choices”, NBER Working Paper.
  • Durlauf, S.N. and Ioannides, Y. M. (2010) ”Social Interactions”, Annual Review of Economics, 2, 451-478.
  • Foster, A.D. and Rosenzweig, M.R. (1996) ”Technical Change and Human-Capital Returns and Investments: Evidence from the Green Revolution”, American Economic Review, 86(4).
  • Galiani, S., Gertler, P. and Schargrodsky, E. (2005) ”Water for Life: The Impact of the Privatization of Water Services on Child Mortality in Argentina”, Journal of Political Economy, 113, 83-120.
  • Gine, X., Townsend, R. and Vickerey, J. (2008) ”Rational Expectations? Evidence from Planting Decisions in Semi-Arid India”.
  • Hahn, J.; Todd, P. and Van der Klaauw, W. (2001) ”Identification and Estimation of Treatment Effects with a Regression-Discontinuity Design”, Econometrica, Vol. 69, No. 1 (January).
  • Heckman, J. J.; Ichimura, H.; and P. Todd (1998) ”Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator”, Review of Economic Studies, 65, 261-294.
  • Heckman, J. J. (1997) ”Instrumental Variables: A Study of Implicit Behavioral Assumptions Used in Making Program Evaluations”, Journal of Human Resources 32, 441-462.
  • Hoxby, C. and Weingarth, G (2005) ”Taking Race out of the equation: School Reassignment and the Structure of Peer Effects”.
  • Imbens, W. G. and Lemieux, T. (2007) ”Regression Discontinuity Designs: A Guide to Practice”, Journal of Econometrics.
  • Jayachandran, S. and Lleras-Muney, A. (2009), ”Life Expectancy and Human Capital Investments: Evidence from Maternal Mortality Declines”, The Quarterly Journal of Economics,124(1), 349-297.
  • Jensen, R. (2010) ”The (Perceived) Returns to Education and the Demand for Schooling”, The Quarterly Journal of Economics,125(2).
  • Kaufmann, K.M. (2014) ”Understanding the Income Gradient in College Attendance in Mexico:The Role of Heterogeneity in Expected Returns”, Quantitative Economics.
  • Lochner, L. and Moretti, E. (2004) ”The Effect of Education on Crime: Evidence from Prison Inmates, Arrests, and Self-Reports,” American Economic Review 94(1), pages 155-189.
  • Ludwig, J. and Miller, D. (2007). ”Does Head Start Improve Children’s Life Chances? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design,” The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 122(1).
  • Ludwig, J., Duncan, G., and Hirschfield, P. (2001) ”Urban Poverty and Juvenile Crime: Evidence from a Randomized Housing-Mobility Experiment.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 116:2, 655-679.
  • Mahajan, A. and Tarozzi, A. (2010) ”Time Inconsistency, Expectations and Technology Adoption”, mimeo.
  • Manski, C. (1993) ”Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem”, Review of Economic Studies, 60.
  • Manski, . (2000). ”Economic Analysis of Social Interactions.” Journal of Economic Perspectives, 14(3): 115-136.
  • Manski (2004) ”Measuring Expectations”, Econometrica, 72(5).
  • Mas, A. and Moretti, E. (2009). ”Peers at Work,” American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(1), pages 112-45.
  • Meyer, B.D. (1995) ”Natural and Quasi-Experiments in Economics”, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, 13 (2), 151-161.
  • Miguel, E. and Kremer, M. (2004) ”Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities, Econometrica, 72(1), 159-217.
  • Todd, P. (2001) ”A practical guide for the implementation of matching estimators”
  • Rosenzweig and Wolpin (2000) ”Natural ’Natural’ Experiments”, Journal of Economic Literature, 38 (4), 827-874.
  • Rubin (1974) ”Estimating Causal Effects of Treatments in Randomized and Nonrandomized Studies”, Journal of Education Psychology, 66, 688-701.
  • Schechter, L. (2007a) ”Theft, Gift-Giving, and Trustworthiness: Honesty is Its Own Reward in Rural Paraguay,” American Economic Review, 97(5): 1560-1582.
  • Schechter, L. (2007b) ”Risk Aversion and Expected-Utility Theory: A Calibration Exercise,” Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 35(1): 67-76.
  • Stinebrickner, T. and Stinebrickner, R. (2009) ”Learning about Academic Ability and the College Drop-Out Decision”, mimeo.

Competences acquired

The course should facilitate the process of generating research ideas and formulating them in a research proposal. Students learn a selection of methods and tools necessary to write applied micro papers. Students practice presenting papers and defending their own research ideas.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
15:30
17:00
Room 002, Building L9, 1-2

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E891

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

This course is targeted to second-year Ph.D. students in economics. Students are expected to have completed first-year micro and macro theory courses.


Course Content

This course is an introduction to international trade at the Ph.D. level. The first part of the course will have a lecture structure and we will discuss the core models of modern international trade theory. We will study neoclassical trade models, i.e., the Ricardian- and Heckscher-Ohlin models  and then move to trade models with imperfect competition. Particular emphasis will be given to models with firm-level heterogeneity. The second part of the course will be organized as a seminar: depending on the number of participants, either students will present papers at the research frontier or there will be a reading group format. Topics covered depend on the students’ interest.

 

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades:

Class room participation, problem sets, oral presentation.


Competences acquired

Students will be familiar with the core models and methods used in modern research in international trade. They will know the research frontier in this field and will be able to start independent research projects that may lead to a dissertation in international trade. 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
05.09.17
05.12.17
Tuesday
12:00
13:30
Room S 031, Building L7, 3-5

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: E893

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

E700-E703, E801-E806


Course Content

The reading group is aimed at 2nd and higher year Ph.D. students to support them during their research phase.

The reading group will provide a forum to discuss papers from various fields in Applied Empirical Economics (such as Labour, Education, Public, Development, etc.) or Applied Econometrics. Papers to be presented by students could either be seminal paper, which students feel they have always wanted to read and discuss with peers, or recently published papers/working papers. The aim is to get acquired with the seminal as well as the latest literature and learn how to read and present a research paper effectively. Students are encouraged to discuss papers which are on their reading list for their thesis.

Faculty will be invited to attend to contribute to the discussion.


Competences acquired

  • Ability to present and confidence building: Learn how to present well. (This is often easier with a paper that somebody else wrote – one is not as emotionally involved in the question/ approach/ results as with one’s own paper.)
  • Discussion competence: Learn how to be a good seminar participant: Behave well, ask clear questions, discuss in an appropriate manner etc.
  • Ability to understand: Learn how to read and approach research papers and learn to summarise the main message/points of the paper
  • Commit to a reading routine for your thesis
  • Know your field: Learn about the literature, both in your own (sub-field) of interest and other fields.
  • Community building: The reading group will spawn discussion and encourage community building


Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades:
Presentation and Presence and participation in discussion. Participants are expected to read the papers to be discussed prior to class.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
06.09.17
06.12.17
Wednesday
15:30
17:00
Room 410, Building L7, 3-5

Register

Economics Fall 2017

E700
Mathematics for Economists
E701
Advanced Microeconomics I
E702
Advanced Macroeconomics I
E703
Advanced Econometrics I
E800
CDSE Seminar
E8002
Microeconometric Methods: Duration, Count Data, and Censored Regression Analysis (2nd-Year)
E8004
Reading Course in Environmental Economics (3rd-Year)
E8010
Econometrics Research Seminar (3rd-Year)
E8011
Structural Vector Autoregressions (2nd-Year)
E8012
Macro Reading Group (2nd-Year)
E820
Experimental Econometrics and RCTs in Development Economics (2nd-Year)
E839
Research Seminar in Macroeconomics
E841
Theory of Industrial Organization (2nd-Year)
E846
PhD Reading Course in Industrial Organization (3rd-Year)
E864
Advances in Public Economics and Political Economy (2nd-Year)
E873
Research Seminar in Public Economics (3rd-Year)
E887
Topics in Applied Microeconometrics (2nd-Year)
E891
International Trade (2nd-Year)
E893
Reading Group in Applied Economics (3rd-Year)