BE INSPIRED

"The Graduate School provides vast resources for doctoral students, including a wide range of courses conducive to training and thesis work." Dominic Ponattu, CDSS

Course Catalog

Spring 2016


Course Type: core course

Course Number: DIS

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Dissertation Proposal Workshop 


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback for CDSS PhD candidates in political science on their ongoing dissertation project. In this workshop CDSS students are expected to play two roles. They should provide feedback to their peers as well as present their own work in order to receive feedback.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
307, D7, 27

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: DIS

Credits: 2+8

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review

You should be prepared to address the following questions: What makes a particular research question an interesting question? Is it an important question? What contributions would this question and the answers make to the scholarly literature? What strategies are there to answer your research question(s)?


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback on writing students' dissertation proposal. Such a proposal is a research outline that delineates the doctoral thesis project, including the motivation for research question(s), the survey of the relevant theoretical and empirical contributions (building on the Literature Review), the development of a theoretical framework, the specification of the methodology and planned empirical analysis.

Nota bene: Further meeting dates and locations will be determined during the first session.

Information on how to submit the dissertation proposal (8 ECTS) can be retrieved from the CDSS regulations section.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1st meeting
17.02.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
A 5, 6 room C 212
07.03.16
Monday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
11.03.16
Friday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
25.04.16
Monday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
06.05.16
Friday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide guidance and constructive feedback on writing academic papers in English. Each session will guide students through techniques for writing and/or revision of a paper or other similar document. Between sessions, students will apply techniques learnt to their own texts, receiving frequent feedback on their papers and tips on how to improve their writing. By the end of the course each participant will have improved at least one paper to a publishable standard and should be able to approach their next paper with greater confidence.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
12:00
13:30
C 012 in A5


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 2

Course Content

Please refer to the MZES webpages for dates and times.



Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

Attending the Seminar Series on the Political Economy of Reforms is a possible alternative to attending the MZES B colloquium. Please refer to the SFB 884 website for dates and times.



Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: up to 12

Prerequisites

CDSS PhD students have privileged access to the GESIS Summer School in Survey Methodology. Course credits will be recognized. To obtain information about the summer school program and registration, please refer to the GESIS website.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
04.08.16
26.08.16
09:00
18:00
GESIS, Cologne


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

You should be familiar with the basics of regression models and maximum likelihood estimation. Ideally you also have attended the Bayes I course at the CDSS (but you will be able to follow if you have not). While I discuss models and algorithms in a general fashion, you will benefit a lot more from our computing exercises if you have at least a working familiarity with R. Good introductory resources are UCLA’s Stat Consulting Site and John Verzani’s free book SimpleR.


Course Content

This second part of the Bayesian workshop series introduces more advanced models. We will cover Bayesian versions of latent variable models, such as factor models and item response theory or ideal point models, as well as models for simultaneous outcomes, such as seemingly unrelated regression and multivariate probit models. Furthermore, we will discuss models to deal with the ubiquitous problem of missing data in a fully Bayesian context.

Each lecture is followed by lab sessions, where we replicate examples from the lecture and discuss how to understand fitted models through predictions and graphical displays.

Software:
We will use both R and JAGS for Bayesian computations. Please bring your laptop.

 

Full course outline


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
26.02.16
18.03.16
Friday
09:30
16:30
308 in L9,7

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
12.02.16
19.02.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
A 301 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
04.04.16
Monday
09:00
17:00
A 302 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
06.05.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
A 301 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
23.05.16
Monday
09:00
17:00
A 302 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

Interviewers occupy a central role in the implementation of face-to-face and telephone surveys. We now know that interviewers affect the survey process in various ways, both positively (e.g., increasing response rates) and negatively (e.g., introducing measurement errors). The Total Survey Error (TSE) framework describes the different ways that interviewers can affect the survey process. Interviewers can have variable effects on the coverage of the sampling frame during listing and screening operations, rates of contact and cooperation (nonresponse), the answers that cooperating respondents provide (measurement), and the coding and editing of the information provided (processing). This course considers the roles that interviewers play during the survey process and and reviews key literature on interviewer effects on bias and variance in survey estimates.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
19.02.16
Friday
15:30
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
12.03.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
16.04.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
21.05.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6+2

Course Content

Lecture "Longitudinal Data Analysis"

 

The lecture gives a broad overview over methods of longitudinal data analysis. The focus of the course lies on methods for panel and event history data analysis and their application in the social sciences. Attendance of the complementary course "Data Sources in Social Sciences" is highly recommended as the course illustrates the practical application of the methods in Stata and deepens understanding of the theoretical content of the lecture.

Lab Course "Data Sources in Social Sciences"

Using Stata we practice methods of longitudinal data analysis (especially first-difference-models, random/fixed effects-models, event history analysis) with examples mainly from the German SOEP. Attendance of the complementary lecture " Longitudinal Data Analysis " is highly recommended as firm knowledge of the lecture content is presumed. In addition, a further prerequisite for participation is firm knowledge of data preparation and estimation of simple linear regressions in Stata.

Suggested Readings:

  • Blossfeld, H.-P., K. Golsch, and G. Rohwer (2009): Event History Analysis with Stata. New York/ London: Psychology Press. [But avoid the philosophical part of the book on causality in chapter 1]
  • Andreß, H.J.,K. Golsch, and A. Schmidt (2013) Applied Panel Data Analysis for Economic and Social Surveys. Springer.

6 ECTS will be awarded for successful completion of an exam and an additional 2 ECTS can be awarded for participation in the lab course and submission of two practical assignments.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Lecture
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
B 244 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Tutorial
Lab Course
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
10:15
11:45
C-108 (PC/Methods Lab) in A 5, 6 Bauteil C


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Course Content

In this seminar, we will deal with models of item response theory (IRT) and their applications. After a review of some models of classical test theory, students will learn about different IRT models for categorical data. We will cover the Rasch model, the two-, and the three-parameter logistic model (for binary data) as well as models for polytomous data. We will discuss applications such as differential item functioning (DIF) or computerized adaptive testing (CAT), and standard software (e.g., R) will be used for illustrative data analyses.

 

Literature

  • Embretson, S. E., & Reise, S. P. (2000). Item response theory for psychologists. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Moosbrugger, H., & Kelava, A. (Eds.). (2012). Testtheorie und Fragebogenkonstruktion (2nd ed.). doi:10.1007/978-3-642-20072-4
  • Rost, J. (2004). Lehrbuch Testtheorie - Testkonstruktion (2nd ed.). Göttingen: Huber.
  • Strobl, C. (2012). Das Rasch-Modell: Eine verständliche Einführung für Studium und Praxis. Mering: Rainer Hampp.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
EO 242 Seminarraum

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course gives an overview of the design and implementation of survey questionnaires from the operationalization of the research questions to their implementation in a full questionnaire. Topics covered include operationalizing research questions, guidelines for writing survey questions, testing questions with cognitive interviews and eye-tracking, ordering the questionnaire, the effect of survey modes and questionnaire design in cross-cultural research. The course will be taught in a mix of seminar-style sessions, where the literature on questionnaire design is presented and discussed, and hands-on practical sessions, where students design and test survey questions.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
19.02.16
Friday
13:45
15:15
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
11.03.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
15.04.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
20.05.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Course Content

In this seminar, we will learn how to use R, a powerful programming language that is often used for statistical analyses, simulations, and cognitive modeling. The first half of the seminar aims at a basic understanding of R covering the basic functionality such as objects, functions, data management, plotting, and simple optimization.

In the second half of the seminar, we will discuss advanced topics depending on the interest of the seminar participants. Possible topics are:
* Writing an own R package
* Linear models (ANOVA, regression, mixed models)
* Item response theory
* Monte-Carlo simulations (robustness of statistical analyses, parallel computing)
* Cognitive modeling (e.g., signal detection or multinomial processing trees)

It is planned that participants work on small group projects such as analyzing own data, replicating a paper, or running a small simulation. These projects will be presented in the last sessions.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
13:45
15:15
EO 162 CIP-Pool, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich neben den Mitgliedern der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) auch an alle anderen Studierenden, Doktoranden und Nachwuchswissenschaftler in den Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme sind solide Kenntnisse in multivariaten Analyseverfahren und erste praktische Erfahrungen mit der Datenanalyse. Kenntnisse im Arbeiten mit dem SOEP werden nicht vorausgesetzt. In den Beispielen und Übungen im Rahmen des Workshops wird ausschließlich das Statistikprogrammpaket STATA verwendet.

Die Teilnahmegebühr  beträgt 50 Euro (reduziert für Studierende auf 20 Euro).

Anmeldungen sind ab dem 21. März 2016 und bis zum 20. Mai 2016 möglich. Registrierungen nach Ablauf der Anmeldefrist bitte per E-Mail an 'gess(at)uni-mannheim.de.
Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 35 begrenzt. Nach Ablauf der Anmeldefrist schicken wir ihnen eine Anmeldebestätigung mit Details, wie die Teilnahmegebühr zu entrichten ist.


Course Content

Das SOEP ist eine seit 1984 laufende jährliche Wiederholungsbefragung in Deutschland. Es ist eine der am längsten laufenden Panelstudien weltweit. Themenschwerpunkte sind unter anderem Haushaltszusammensetzung, Erwerbs- und Familienbiographie, Erwerbsbeteiligung und berufliche Mobilität, Einkommensverläufe, Gesundheit und Lebenszufriedenheit. Das Arbeiten mit einem komplexen Längsschnittdatensatz wie dem SOEP bietet viele Möglichkeiten, fordert aber auch spezielle Kenntnisse. Der Workshop bietet daher die Möglichkeit, einen fundierten Einblick in das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP zu erhalten. Grundsätzlich werden Kenntnisse in zwei Bereichen vermittelt. Zum einen wird ein Überblick über die Analysemöglichkeiten des SOEP gegeben und eine Einführung in die Datenaufbereitung gegeben. Zum anderen werden Analyseverfahren für Längsschnittdaten vorgestellt (Panelregression); einschließlich von Übungen auf Basis des SOEP. Zusammen bieten beide Teile eine Grundlage für eigene Forschungsarbeiten mit dem SOEP und ähnlichen Längsschnittdatensätzen.

Der Workshop wird von der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Längsschnittstudie "Sozio-oekonomisches Panel"/DIW Berlin veranstaltet. Lokaler Ausrichter ist der Lehrstuhl für Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung (Professor Dr. Thomas Gautschi). Für die Teilnahme an dem Kurs und das Erfüllen von Aufgaben im Anschluss können 3 ECTS vergeben werden.

 

Kursprogramm:

Montag 27.06.2016:
Der erste Tag bietet eine anwendungsorientierte Einführung in den Aufbau, die Inhalte und das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP. Im Rahmen des allgemeinen Überblicks wird auch auf aktuelle Innovationen im SOEP eingegangen. Neben einer Darstellung, wie die SOEP-Daten effizient aufbereitet werden können, sind im Rahmen der Übungen am Nachmittag auch Beratungen zu individuellen Fragestellungen vorgesehen. Weitergehende Einzelberatungen sind am Folgetag möglich. Leitung: Alexandra Fedorets & Knut Wenzig (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 9.45 Begrüßung
  • 10:00-11.15 Einführung in das SOEP
  • 11:15-11:30 Pause
  • 11:30-13:00 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Datenstruktur, SOEPinfo
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15:45 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Aufbereitung von Querschnitts- und Längsschnittsdatensätzen
  • 15:45-16:00 Pause
  • 16:00-18:00 Stichprobenziehung und Gewichtung im SOEP
  • 19:00 Gemeinsames Abendessen (fakultativ)

Dienstag 28.06.2016:
Am zweiten Tag werden grundlegende Regressionsmodelle für Paneldaten vorgestellt. Dieser Kursabschnitt richtet sich dabei ausdrücklich an Anfänger der Panelanalyse und setzt lediglich Vorwissen zu multivariaten Analyseverfahren voraus. Am Vormittag werden die Modelle erläutert. Am Nachmittag wird deren Anwendung anhand eines SOEP-Beispiels demonstriert. Danach besteht für TeilnehmerInnen, die ein eigenes Forschungsprojekt planen oder das SOEP bereits nutzen, die Möglichkeit spezifische Fragen individuell zu besprechen.
Leitung: Marco Giesselmann (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 10:30-13:00 Einführung in die Analyse von Paneldaten: Einfache Regression, Fixed Effects Regression
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15.15 Random Effects Regression
  • 15.15-15.30 Pause
  • 15.30-17.00 Hybride Regressionen

Mittwoch, 29. Juni 2016
Am dritten Tag wird mit Propensity Score Matching ein weiteres Analyseverfahren dargestellt. Neben einer allgemeinen Einführung werden auch Kombinationsmöglichkeiten mit Verfahren der Längsschnittanalyse (u.a. Difference-in-differences Matching) gezeigt. Wie am Vortag schließen sich praktische Übungen mit dem SOEP an eine theoretische Einführung an.
Leitung: Giuseppe Pietrantuono (Universität Mannheim)

  • 09:30-12:30: Propensity Score Matching
  • 12:30-14:00: Pause
  • 14:00-17:00: Propensity Score Matching

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Block
27.06.16
29.06.16
Monday to Wednesday
09:30
18:00
C -108 (PC-lab) in A5, 6

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 7

Prerequisites

  • Contents of an introductory course on systematic reviews and meta-analysis (e.g., the ones offered by the course instructor at the University of Mannheim in the following semesters: FSS 2015, or HWS 2014, or FSS 2014).
  • M.Sc. or PhD thesis topic has been (at least roughly) defined already
  • Basic understanding of R ( www.r-project.org )

Course Content

This course will assist students to prepare, conduct, and to write-up a systematic review and/or meta-analysis for a M.Sc. or PhD thesis, encompassing the entire research synthesis process, namely:

  • Developing a problem statement and specifying research questions / hypotheses for a systematic review / meta-analysis;
  • Data collection (systematic retrieval and selection of studies);
  • Data extraction, coding, and unifying effect sizes;
  • Analysis and interpretation;
  • Reporting / writing a thesis encompassing a systematic review / meta-analysis.
  • Special emphasis will be on the analysis procedure (4) using R packages (esp. metafor: www.metafor-project.org ).

Literature:

Bornstein, M., Hedges, L.V., Higgins, J.P.T, & Rothstein, H.R. (2009). Introduction to Meta-Analysis. Chichester, UK: Wiley.

Card, N.A. (2011). Applied Meta-Analysis for the Social Sciences. New York: Guilford Press.

Cooper, H. (2010). Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: A Step-by-Step Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Cooper, H., Hedges, L.V., & Valentine, J.C. (Eds.) (2009). Handbook of Research Synthesis (2nd ed.). New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (2004). Methods of meta-analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lipsey, M.W., & Wilson, D.B. (2001). Practical Meta-analysis. Thousand Oaks: Sage.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
03.02.16
Wednesday
15:15
16:45
EO 259, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost
17.02.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
every three weeks
02.03.16
13.04.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
biweekly
27.04.16
11.05.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
01.06.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/POL

Credits: 6+2

Prerequisites

Knowledge of Multivariate Analysis


Course Content

This course serves  as an introduction to a multitude of probability models that are appropriate when the linear model is inadequate. After introducing the fundamentals from which statistical models are developed, this course will focus on one specific theory of inference, namely on the statistical theory of maximum likelihood. We will also devote considerable time to statistical programming, simulating and conveying quantities of material interest of such models (using R).

Course Readings:

  • Eliason, Scott R. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • King, Gary. 2008. Unifying political methodology: the likelihood theory of statistical inference. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Students who wish to pass this course must complete homework assignments and produce a research paper. Participation in the tutorial session (2 ECTS) is necessary for the assignments which complement the lecture (6 ECTS).


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesdays
08:30
10:00
B 143 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Tutorial
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursdays
08:30
10:00
C -108 Methodenlabor in A 5, 6 Bauteil C

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 6

Course Content

This lecture gives an overview of selected theoretical concepts and the main research findings in the field of Comparative Government, specifically focusing on the role of political institutions and their impact for political decision-making at all stages in the political process. The course introduces a number of core themes in the comparative study of political institutions, such as constitutions and their design as well as electoral institutions and their effects on turnout and voting behaviour. In addition, the lecture focuses on the impact of different institutional designs on patterns of party competition, government formation and coalition governance. In a third step, we discuss the effects of political institutions on various aspects of legislative behaviour.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
10:15
11:45
B243 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 6

Course Content

This is a graduate course on international political economy. The course assumes familiarity with the contents of the international relations and with economics. The twin goals of the course are to (a) introduce students to contemporary scholarly research on International Political Economy topics and (b) stimulate students to form original ideas for promising research projects in the area of international relations and political economy.
The course examines how domestic and international politics drive trade, investment, financial, and immigration policies and outcomes. It emphasizes the theoretical core, and some current debates, in the field but also aims to expose students to some nuts and bolts of each policy area and the chief methods by which scholars acquire knowledge of the subject. We pick up some knowledge of historical and contemporary examples wherever possible, but presenting historical material systematically is not the focus of the course.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
biweeky
19.02.16
03.06.16
Friday
15:30
18:45
B 317 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course offers an introduction into legislative politics with a particular emphasis on the link of theories and methods: what can we learn about legislators and their preferences when we look at their behavior? Our key focus will be on roll call voting and ideal point estimation (which is of course useful in other areas as well, for instance in IR or IPE) using spatial voting theory. While we read some of the seminal literature in this field we will spend equal time and effort in the lab to become trained in programming and using different methods out there (NOMINATE, optimal classification, Bayesian methods).

Computing is done in R and JAGS. As this is a research seminar, the course allows students to pursue areas of individual interest in more depth, and therefore course content is to some extent determined based on the interests of the students.

 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
A 302 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

• Regular attendance and active class participation
• Class presentation and leading the class discussion
• A research paper


Course Content

In this course, we will engage with contemporary research on the dynamics of civil war and post-war reconstruction. We will thus address questions such as: When does civil war break out? How are rebel groups formed and sustained and when do they use different forms of violence?  How can conflict be ended and which political, economic, social, and psychological challenges are post-war societies faced with? How for example can former combatants be disarmed and reintegrated into society and what are the consequences of child soldiering? Finally we will also examine whether peacebuilding, development aid and democratization really contribute to a lasting peace. The seminar will start with a theoretical part in which we look at the different theories concerning peace and conflict dynamics. The second part of the seminar we will then apply the before discussed theories to analyse different cases of civil war.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
12:00
13:30
A102 in B6, 23-25, Bauteil A


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course focuses on the main topics of international relations, such as the analysis of international cooperation and international organizations, the theory of democratic peace, and the causes and consequences of civil and ethnic wars. Furthermore, the course covers research strategies in international relations


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
B 244 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL

Credits: 8

Course Content

This course will focus on the politics of the United Nations. After introducing into the theories of international cooperation we will study the history and development of the United Nations. Topics will include the institutional framework of the United Nations, decision making within and across the institutional actors such as the principal organs including the Security Council, the General Assembly, and the Secretariat, appraise the UN’s relationships with other global actors, such as the main international financial institutions, civil society, the private sector, the media, and evaluate the overall effectiveness of the UN regarding key policy issue-areas such as international peace and security, human rights, and economic, environmental and social development.
 
Participants are expected to write a paper, preferably with a replication of an empirical study on these topics. The main goals of the course are to sharpen analytical, presentation, and writing skills with a focus on decision making and problem-solving at the United Nations, and to work scientifically in developing own research and writing a paper that contributes to the state of art.

 

Literature:
 
Weiss, Thomas and Sam Daws. 2008. The Oxford Handbook on the United Nations, Oxford: Oxford Unicversity Press.
 
Weiss, Thomas. 2009. What’s Wrong with the United Nations and How to Fix it, Cambridge, UK: Polity.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
17:15
18:45
B 318 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/SOC

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

t.b.a.


Course Content

The main goal of this lecture is to present an advanced introduction to theoretical approaches, key concepts, and substantive issues in comparative political sociology. Building on a multi-level perspective, it will provide an overview of key concepts and theories in the analysis of micro-level processes of political behavior that are embedded in and feed into macro-level processes. Capitalizing on this analytical perspective, the lecture will also show major changes in the relationship between societal and political processes and institutions.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
10:15
11:45
B 244 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/SOC

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Credit points can be obtained for a paper (8,000 words), the oral presentation of this paper, as well as active participation during the sessions.


Course Content

Comparison is essential to research in political sociology. At the same time, it raises multiple issues of comparability and equivalence. What is ‘similar’, what is ‘different’? And how can we figure out whether measures are equivalent or not? In this seminar, we will address the conceptual and methodological issues in measurement in comparative political research. Students will review the latest empirical studies in the field and prepare research papers in which they analyze specific questions using available data sets.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesdays
12:00
13:30
B 317 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

  • Foundations of linear algebra and probability theory (high school level)
  • Computer skills that allow you to get familiar with complex applications fast

Course Content

The course presents methods for the computer assisted automatic analysis of digital documents as a basis for further quantitative content analyses used in social and cultural sciences.

In the beginning we will present some possible analyses computational linguistics can offer to social and cultural sciences using the software GATE. This is followed by a short programming course in the Python programming language introducing a more flexible way of pre-processing texts and also access to text data through web crawling and conversion of different file formats. More advanced methods on text classification and clustering are presented later on along with more tools that can be used. In the final part of the course participants will present their own project work to each other.

Passing the course is based on:

  • Implementation of a project
  • Final presentation
  • Report (~ 15 pages)

 Motivation / Trigger

  • Analyzing the 2016 Presidential Candidates on Twitter:

         http://www.doz.com/social-media/2016-presidential-candidates-on-twitter

  • Building applications like:

          http://www.stockfluence.com

          https://www.stockpulse.de/en

          http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/6-social-media-monitoring-tools/


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
08.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A 5, 6
22.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6
29.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6
Presentations
20.05.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: DIS

Credits: 2+8

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review

You should be prepared to address the following questions: What makes a particular research question an interesting question? Is it an important question? What contributions would this question and the answers make to the scholarly literature? What strategies are there to answer your research question(s)?


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback on writing students' dissertation proposal. Such a proposal is a research outline that delineates the doctoral thesis project, including the motivation for research question(s), the survey of the relevant theoretical and empirical contributions (building on the Literature Review), the development of a theoretical framework, the specification of the methodology and planned empirical analysis.

Nota bene: Further meeting dates and locations will be determined during the first session.

Information on how to submit the dissertation proposal (8 ECTS) can be retrieved from the CDSS regulations section.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1st meeting
17.02.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
A 5, 6 room C 212
07.03.16
Monday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
11.03.16
Friday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
25.04.16
Monday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
06.05.16
Friday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

TCBI, CSSR, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

Please check with individual chairs in the Psychology department for dates and times of research colloquia.



Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

Research projects in cognitive psychology and neuropsychology are planned, conducted, analyzed, and discussed.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Dissertation Workshop
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
15:30
17:00
EO 259, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

TBCI, CSSR, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

In this seminar we will discuss current issues in Social Cognition. Participants will be required to read current journal articles and to present and discuss them in class. Building either on a literature review or on a linkage to ongoing research projects at the University of Mannheim, participants will be asked to develop own research ideas. These research ideas will be presented in class and will provide a basis for in-class discussions.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Dissertation Workshop
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
13:45
15:15
B 318 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide guidance and constructive feedback on writing academic papers in English. Each session will guide students through techniques for writing and/or revision of a paper or other similar document. Between sessions, students will apply techniques learnt to their own texts, receiving frequent feedback on their papers and tips on how to improve their writing. By the end of the course each participant will have improved at least one paper to a publishable standard and should be able to approach their next paper with greater confidence.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
12:00
13:30
C 012 in A5


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: up to 12

Prerequisites

CDSS PhD students have privileged access to the GESIS Summer School in Survey Methodology. Course credits will be recognized. To obtain information about the summer school program and registration, please refer to the GESIS website.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
04.08.16
26.08.16
09:00
18:00
GESIS, Cologne


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

You should be familiar with the basics of regression models and maximum likelihood estimation. Ideally you also have attended the Bayes I course at the CDSS (but you will be able to follow if you have not). While I discuss models and algorithms in a general fashion, you will benefit a lot more from our computing exercises if you have at least a working familiarity with R. Good introductory resources are UCLA’s Stat Consulting Site and John Verzani’s free book SimpleR.


Course Content

This second part of the Bayesian workshop series introduces more advanced models. We will cover Bayesian versions of latent variable models, such as factor models and item response theory or ideal point models, as well as models for simultaneous outcomes, such as seemingly unrelated regression and multivariate probit models. Furthermore, we will discuss models to deal with the ubiquitous problem of missing data in a fully Bayesian context.

Each lecture is followed by lab sessions, where we replicate examples from the lecture and discuss how to understand fitted models through predictions and graphical displays.

Software:
We will use both R and JAGS for Bayesian computations. Please bring your laptop.

 

Full course outline


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
26.02.16
18.03.16
Friday
09:30
16:30
308 in L9,7

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
12.02.16
19.02.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
A 301 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
04.04.16
Monday
09:00
17:00
A 302 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
06.05.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
A 301 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
23.05.16
Monday
09:00
17:00
A 302 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

Interviewers occupy a central role in the implementation of face-to-face and telephone surveys. We now know that interviewers affect the survey process in various ways, both positively (e.g., increasing response rates) and negatively (e.g., introducing measurement errors). The Total Survey Error (TSE) framework describes the different ways that interviewers can affect the survey process. Interviewers can have variable effects on the coverage of the sampling frame during listing and screening operations, rates of contact and cooperation (nonresponse), the answers that cooperating respondents provide (measurement), and the coding and editing of the information provided (processing). This course considers the roles that interviewers play during the survey process and and reviews key literature on interviewer effects on bias and variance in survey estimates.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
19.02.16
Friday
15:30
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
12.03.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
16.04.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
21.05.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6+2

Course Content

Lecture "Longitudinal Data Analysis"

 

The lecture gives a broad overview over methods of longitudinal data analysis. The focus of the course lies on methods for panel and event history data analysis and their application in the social sciences. Attendance of the complementary course "Data Sources in Social Sciences" is highly recommended as the course illustrates the practical application of the methods in Stata and deepens understanding of the theoretical content of the lecture.

Lab Course "Data Sources in Social Sciences"

Using Stata we practice methods of longitudinal data analysis (especially first-difference-models, random/fixed effects-models, event history analysis) with examples mainly from the German SOEP. Attendance of the complementary lecture " Longitudinal Data Analysis " is highly recommended as firm knowledge of the lecture content is presumed. In addition, a further prerequisite for participation is firm knowledge of data preparation and estimation of simple linear regressions in Stata.

Suggested Readings:

  • Blossfeld, H.-P., K. Golsch, and G. Rohwer (2009): Event History Analysis with Stata. New York/ London: Psychology Press. [But avoid the philosophical part of the book on causality in chapter 1]
  • Andreß, H.J.,K. Golsch, and A. Schmidt (2013) Applied Panel Data Analysis for Economic and Social Surveys. Springer.

6 ECTS will be awarded for successful completion of an exam and an additional 2 ECTS can be awarded for participation in the lab course and submission of two practical assignments.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Lecture
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
B 244 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Tutorial
Lab Course
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
10:15
11:45
C-108 (PC/Methods Lab) in A 5, 6 Bauteil C


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Course Content

In this seminar, we will deal with models of item response theory (IRT) and their applications. After a review of some models of classical test theory, students will learn about different IRT models for categorical data. We will cover the Rasch model, the two-, and the three-parameter logistic model (for binary data) as well as models for polytomous data. We will discuss applications such as differential item functioning (DIF) or computerized adaptive testing (CAT), and standard software (e.g., R) will be used for illustrative data analyses.

 

Literature

  • Embretson, S. E., & Reise, S. P. (2000). Item response theory for psychologists. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Moosbrugger, H., & Kelava, A. (Eds.). (2012). Testtheorie und Fragebogenkonstruktion (2nd ed.). doi:10.1007/978-3-642-20072-4
  • Rost, J. (2004). Lehrbuch Testtheorie - Testkonstruktion (2nd ed.). Göttingen: Huber.
  • Strobl, C. (2012). Das Rasch-Modell: Eine verständliche Einführung für Studium und Praxis. Mering: Rainer Hampp.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
EO 242 Seminarraum

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course gives an overview of the design and implementation of survey questionnaires from the operationalization of the research questions to their implementation in a full questionnaire. Topics covered include operationalizing research questions, guidelines for writing survey questions, testing questions with cognitive interviews and eye-tracking, ordering the questionnaire, the effect of survey modes and questionnaire design in cross-cultural research. The course will be taught in a mix of seminar-style sessions, where the literature on questionnaire design is presented and discussed, and hands-on practical sessions, where students design and test survey questions.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
19.02.16
Friday
13:45
15:15
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
11.03.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
15.04.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
20.05.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Course Content

In this seminar, we will learn how to use R, a powerful programming language that is often used for statistical analyses, simulations, and cognitive modeling. The first half of the seminar aims at a basic understanding of R covering the basic functionality such as objects, functions, data management, plotting, and simple optimization.

In the second half of the seminar, we will discuss advanced topics depending on the interest of the seminar participants. Possible topics are:
* Writing an own R package
* Linear models (ANOVA, regression, mixed models)
* Item response theory
* Monte-Carlo simulations (robustness of statistical analyses, parallel computing)
* Cognitive modeling (e.g., signal detection or multinomial processing trees)

It is planned that participants work on small group projects such as analyzing own data, replicating a paper, or running a small simulation. These projects will be presented in the last sessions.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
13:45
15:15
EO 162 CIP-Pool, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich neben den Mitgliedern der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) auch an alle anderen Studierenden, Doktoranden und Nachwuchswissenschaftler in den Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme sind solide Kenntnisse in multivariaten Analyseverfahren und erste praktische Erfahrungen mit der Datenanalyse. Kenntnisse im Arbeiten mit dem SOEP werden nicht vorausgesetzt. In den Beispielen und Übungen im Rahmen des Workshops wird ausschließlich das Statistikprogrammpaket STATA verwendet.

Die Teilnahmegebühr  beträgt 50 Euro (reduziert für Studierende auf 20 Euro).

Anmeldungen sind ab dem 21. März 2016 und bis zum 20. Mai 2016 möglich. Registrierungen nach Ablauf der Anmeldefrist bitte per E-Mail an 'gess(at)uni-mannheim.de.
Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 35 begrenzt. Nach Ablauf der Anmeldefrist schicken wir ihnen eine Anmeldebestätigung mit Details, wie die Teilnahmegebühr zu entrichten ist.


Course Content

Das SOEP ist eine seit 1984 laufende jährliche Wiederholungsbefragung in Deutschland. Es ist eine der am längsten laufenden Panelstudien weltweit. Themenschwerpunkte sind unter anderem Haushaltszusammensetzung, Erwerbs- und Familienbiographie, Erwerbsbeteiligung und berufliche Mobilität, Einkommensverläufe, Gesundheit und Lebenszufriedenheit. Das Arbeiten mit einem komplexen Längsschnittdatensatz wie dem SOEP bietet viele Möglichkeiten, fordert aber auch spezielle Kenntnisse. Der Workshop bietet daher die Möglichkeit, einen fundierten Einblick in das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP zu erhalten. Grundsätzlich werden Kenntnisse in zwei Bereichen vermittelt. Zum einen wird ein Überblick über die Analysemöglichkeiten des SOEP gegeben und eine Einführung in die Datenaufbereitung gegeben. Zum anderen werden Analyseverfahren für Längsschnittdaten vorgestellt (Panelregression); einschließlich von Übungen auf Basis des SOEP. Zusammen bieten beide Teile eine Grundlage für eigene Forschungsarbeiten mit dem SOEP und ähnlichen Längsschnittdatensätzen.

Der Workshop wird von der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Längsschnittstudie "Sozio-oekonomisches Panel"/DIW Berlin veranstaltet. Lokaler Ausrichter ist der Lehrstuhl für Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung (Professor Dr. Thomas Gautschi). Für die Teilnahme an dem Kurs und das Erfüllen von Aufgaben im Anschluss können 3 ECTS vergeben werden.

 

Kursprogramm:

Montag 27.06.2016:
Der erste Tag bietet eine anwendungsorientierte Einführung in den Aufbau, die Inhalte und das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP. Im Rahmen des allgemeinen Überblicks wird auch auf aktuelle Innovationen im SOEP eingegangen. Neben einer Darstellung, wie die SOEP-Daten effizient aufbereitet werden können, sind im Rahmen der Übungen am Nachmittag auch Beratungen zu individuellen Fragestellungen vorgesehen. Weitergehende Einzelberatungen sind am Folgetag möglich. Leitung: Alexandra Fedorets & Knut Wenzig (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 9.45 Begrüßung
  • 10:00-11.15 Einführung in das SOEP
  • 11:15-11:30 Pause
  • 11:30-13:00 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Datenstruktur, SOEPinfo
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15:45 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Aufbereitung von Querschnitts- und Längsschnittsdatensätzen
  • 15:45-16:00 Pause
  • 16:00-18:00 Stichprobenziehung und Gewichtung im SOEP
  • 19:00 Gemeinsames Abendessen (fakultativ)

Dienstag 28.06.2016:
Am zweiten Tag werden grundlegende Regressionsmodelle für Paneldaten vorgestellt. Dieser Kursabschnitt richtet sich dabei ausdrücklich an Anfänger der Panelanalyse und setzt lediglich Vorwissen zu multivariaten Analyseverfahren voraus. Am Vormittag werden die Modelle erläutert. Am Nachmittag wird deren Anwendung anhand eines SOEP-Beispiels demonstriert. Danach besteht für TeilnehmerInnen, die ein eigenes Forschungsprojekt planen oder das SOEP bereits nutzen, die Möglichkeit spezifische Fragen individuell zu besprechen.
Leitung: Marco Giesselmann (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 10:30-13:00 Einführung in die Analyse von Paneldaten: Einfache Regression, Fixed Effects Regression
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15.15 Random Effects Regression
  • 15.15-15.30 Pause
  • 15.30-17.00 Hybride Regressionen

Mittwoch, 29. Juni 2016
Am dritten Tag wird mit Propensity Score Matching ein weiteres Analyseverfahren dargestellt. Neben einer allgemeinen Einführung werden auch Kombinationsmöglichkeiten mit Verfahren der Längsschnittanalyse (u.a. Difference-in-differences Matching) gezeigt. Wie am Vortag schließen sich praktische Übungen mit dem SOEP an eine theoretische Einführung an.
Leitung: Giuseppe Pietrantuono (Universität Mannheim)

  • 09:30-12:30: Propensity Score Matching
  • 12:30-14:00: Pause
  • 14:00-17:00: Propensity Score Matching

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Block
27.06.16
29.06.16
Monday to Wednesday
09:30
18:00
C -108 (PC-lab) in A5, 6

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 7

Prerequisites

  • Contents of an introductory course on systematic reviews and meta-analysis (e.g., the ones offered by the course instructor at the University of Mannheim in the following semesters: FSS 2015, or HWS 2014, or FSS 2014).
  • M.Sc. or PhD thesis topic has been (at least roughly) defined already
  • Basic understanding of R ( www.r-project.org )

Course Content

This course will assist students to prepare, conduct, and to write-up a systematic review and/or meta-analysis for a M.Sc. or PhD thesis, encompassing the entire research synthesis process, namely:

  • Developing a problem statement and specifying research questions / hypotheses for a systematic review / meta-analysis;
  • Data collection (systematic retrieval and selection of studies);
  • Data extraction, coding, and unifying effect sizes;
  • Analysis and interpretation;
  • Reporting / writing a thesis encompassing a systematic review / meta-analysis.
  • Special emphasis will be on the analysis procedure (4) using R packages (esp. metafor: www.metafor-project.org ).

Literature:

Bornstein, M., Hedges, L.V., Higgins, J.P.T, & Rothstein, H.R. (2009). Introduction to Meta-Analysis. Chichester, UK: Wiley.

Card, N.A. (2011). Applied Meta-Analysis for the Social Sciences. New York: Guilford Press.

Cooper, H. (2010). Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: A Step-by-Step Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Cooper, H., Hedges, L.V., & Valentine, J.C. (Eds.) (2009). Handbook of Research Synthesis (2nd ed.). New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (2004). Methods of meta-analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lipsey, M.W., & Wilson, D.B. (2001). Practical Meta-analysis. Thousand Oaks: Sage.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
03.02.16
Wednesday
15:15
16:45
EO 259, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost
17.02.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
every three weeks
02.03.16
13.04.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
biweekly
27.04.16
11.05.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
01.06.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/POL

Credits: 6+2

Prerequisites

Knowledge of Multivariate Analysis


Course Content

This course serves  as an introduction to a multitude of probability models that are appropriate when the linear model is inadequate. After introducing the fundamentals from which statistical models are developed, this course will focus on one specific theory of inference, namely on the statistical theory of maximum likelihood. We will also devote considerable time to statistical programming, simulating and conveying quantities of material interest of such models (using R).

Course Readings:

  • Eliason, Scott R. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • King, Gary. 2008. Unifying political methodology: the likelihood theory of statistical inference. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Students who wish to pass this course must complete homework assignments and produce a research paper. Participation in the tutorial session (2 ECTS) is necessary for the assignments which complement the lecture (6 ECTS).


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesdays
08:30
10:00
B 143 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Tutorial
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursdays
08:30
10:00
C -108 Methodenlabor in A 5, 6 Bauteil C

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: PSY

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

This seminar is targeted at doctoral students and post-docs in Psychology.


Course Content

Students will present planned and on-going research (ideas, designs, results) and discuss it with the participants. In some sessions, papers on theoretical or methodological perspectives will be discussed. Some sessions can be dedicated to discussing participants' own drafts and get feedback before submission. The seminar also provides the opportunity to get feedback on practicing conference presentations/job talks etc. Topics may cover all areas of social psychology and consumer psychology.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
02.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
09:30
11:00
324, Parkring 47


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Behavioral data from different cognitive tasks (e.g., successful recall of information, recognition hits, and reaction times) confound various cognitive processes (e.g., forgetting of information due to encoding and/or retrieval difficulties?). Formal modeling approaches aim to achieve the disentanglement and separate assessment of the various processes contributing to cognitive performance. A special advantage of using such modeling approaches becomes evident when cognitive deficits of special populations are of interest. For example, the method allows determining which cognitive processes are affected by pathology (e.g., major depression, ADHD, Alzheimer’s
dementia) and which are spared. Such differentiated knowledge can then inform therapy and intervention approaches. In this seminar, different formal modeling approaches for cognitive tasks will be introduced and critically evaluated. A special emphasis will be given to research applying such modeling approaches to the study of cognitive deficits of various special populations (e.g., patients with schizophrenia or ADHD, older adults with Alzheimer’s dementia). Note that the seminar will not focus on mathematical details of these models but rather on their psychological content and validity.
 
Seminar participants are expected to participate in class regularly and actively, to write reaction papers to selected articles, and to present and discuss selected research articles in class.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
13:45
15:15
EO 242, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Social cognitive neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field devoted to understanding how biological systems implement social processes and behavior and to using biological concepts and methods to inform and refine theories of social processes and behavior. The objective of this lecture (part I & II) is to introduce the concepts and methods of social cognitive neuroscience. Part II of the lectures addresses the following topics: interaction with others (e.g., altruism and helping behavior; game theory and social decision-making), relationships (e.g., attachment; separation, rejection, and loneliness), groups and identity (e.g., identify and self-concept; in- and outgroups and prejudice; herds, crowds, and religion), morality and antisocial behavior (e.g., neuroscience of morality, anger and aggression; control and responsibility), and social developmental (e.g., social learning during infancy, childhood, adolescence).


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
10:15
11:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: PSY

Credits: 4

Course Content

Social interaction is the way people talk and act with each other, including cooperative interactions such as telling the truth and sharing knowledge and competitive interactions such as lying and stealing commodities. It is important to understand the nature of cooperation and competition since almost all conflicts are mixed-motive, containing elements of both cooperation and competition. The purpose of this seminars is not only to explore why we cooperate and compete with others but also how we do so in terms of the underlying cognitive, neural, hormonal, and genetic mechanisms that support those type of behaviors. The seminar covers topics such as interpersonal trust and reciprocity as well as fairness and altruistic punishment in the context of game theory and social decision making utilizing economic game paradigms (e.g., investment game, ultimatum game, prison dilemma game).


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
12:00
13:30
B 244 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

  • Foundations of linear algebra and probability theory (high school level)
  • Computer skills that allow you to get familiar with complex applications fast

Course Content

The course presents methods for the computer assisted automatic analysis of digital documents as a basis for further quantitative content analyses used in social and cultural sciences.

In the beginning we will present some possible analyses computational linguistics can offer to social and cultural sciences using the software GATE. This is followed by a short programming course in the Python programming language introducing a more flexible way of pre-processing texts and also access to text data through web crawling and conversion of different file formats. More advanced methods on text classification and clustering are presented later on along with more tools that can be used. In the final part of the course participants will present their own project work to each other.

Passing the course is based on:

  • Implementation of a project
  • Final presentation
  • Report (~ 15 pages)

 Motivation / Trigger

  • Analyzing the 2016 Presidential Candidates on Twitter:

         http://www.doz.com/social-media/2016-presidential-candidates-on-twitter

  • Building applications like:

          http://www.stockfluence.com

          https://www.stockpulse.de/en

          http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/6-social-media-monitoring-tools/


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
08.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A 5, 6
22.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6
29.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6
Presentations
20.05.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6


Course Type: core course

Course Content

Doctoral theses supervised by Thomas Gautschi, Henning Hillmann and Frauke Kreuter, respectively, will be discussed.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Colloquium
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
17:15
18:45
217, Parkring 47


Course Type: core course

Course Content

Doctoral theses supervised by Bernhard Ebbinghaus, Frank Kalter and Irena Kogan, respectively, will be discussed.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Colloquium
Colloquium
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
19:00
20:30
tbd.

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: DIS

Credits: 2+8

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review

You should be prepared to address the following questions: What makes a particular research question an interesting question? Is it an important question? What contributions would this question and the answers make to the scholarly literature? What strategies are there to answer your research question(s)?


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback on writing students' dissertation proposal. Such a proposal is a research outline that delineates the doctoral thesis project, including the motivation for research question(s), the survey of the relevant theoretical and empirical contributions (building on the Literature Review), the development of a theoretical framework, the specification of the methodology and planned empirical analysis.

Nota bene: Further meeting dates and locations will be determined during the first session.

Information on how to submit the dissertation proposal (8 ECTS) can be retrieved from the CDSS regulations section.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
1st meeting
17.02.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
A 5, 6 room C 212
07.03.16
Monday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
11.03.16
Friday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
25.04.16
Monday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27
06.05.16
Friday
09:00
13:30
Room 307 in D 7, 27


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, TBCI, EAW, Literature Review, Dissertation Proposal


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide support and crucial feedback for second and third year CDSS PhD candidates in sociology on their ongoing dissertation project. In this workshop CDSS students are expected to play two roles. They should provide feedback to their peers as well as present their own work in order to receive feedback.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
12:00
13:30
217, Parkring 47

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

CSSR, Literature Review


Course Content

The goal of this course is to provide guidance and constructive feedback on writing academic papers in English. Each session will guide students through techniques for writing and/or revision of a paper or other similar document. Between sessions, students will apply techniques learnt to their own texts, receiving frequent feedback on their papers and tips on how to improve their writing. By the end of the course each participant will have improved at least one paper to a publishable standard and should be able to approach their next paper with greater confidence.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
12:00
13:30
C 012 in A5


Course Type: core course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 2

Course Content

Please refer to the MZES webpages for dates and times.



Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: up to 12

Prerequisites

CDSS PhD students have privileged access to the GESIS Summer School in Survey Methodology. Course credits will be recognized. To obtain information about the summer school program and registration, please refer to the GESIS website.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Summer School
04.08.16
26.08.16
09:00
18:00
GESIS, Cologne


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

You should be familiar with the basics of regression models and maximum likelihood estimation. Ideally you also have attended the Bayes I course at the CDSS (but you will be able to follow if you have not). While I discuss models and algorithms in a general fashion, you will benefit a lot more from our computing exercises if you have at least a working familiarity with R. Good introductory resources are UCLA’s Stat Consulting Site and John Verzani’s free book SimpleR.


Course Content

This second part of the Bayesian workshop series introduces more advanced models. We will cover Bayesian versions of latent variable models, such as factor models and item response theory or ideal point models, as well as models for simultaneous outcomes, such as seemingly unrelated regression and multivariate probit models. Furthermore, we will discuss models to deal with the ubiquitous problem of missing data in a fully Bayesian context.

Each lecture is followed by lab sessions, where we replicate examples from the lecture and discuss how to understand fitted models through predictions and graphical displays.

Software:
We will use both R and JAGS for Bayesian computations. Please bring your laptop.

 

Full course outline


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
26.02.16
18.03.16
Friday
09:30
16:30
308 in L9,7

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
12.02.16
19.02.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
A 301 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
04.04.16
Monday
09:00
17:00
A 302 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
06.05.16
Friday
09:00
17:00
A 301 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
23.05.16
Monday
09:00
17:00
A 302 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

Interviewers occupy a central role in the implementation of face-to-face and telephone surveys. We now know that interviewers affect the survey process in various ways, both positively (e.g., increasing response rates) and negatively (e.g., introducing measurement errors). The Total Survey Error (TSE) framework describes the different ways that interviewers can affect the survey process. Interviewers can have variable effects on the coverage of the sampling frame during listing and screening operations, rates of contact and cooperation (nonresponse), the answers that cooperating respondents provide (measurement), and the coding and editing of the information provided (processing). This course considers the roles that interviewers play during the survey process and and reviews key literature on interviewer effects on bias and variance in survey estimates.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
19.02.16
Friday
15:30
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
12.03.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
16.04.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
21.05.16
Saturday
10:15
17:00
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6+2

Course Content

Lecture "Longitudinal Data Analysis"

 

The lecture gives a broad overview over methods of longitudinal data analysis. The focus of the course lies on methods for panel and event history data analysis and their application in the social sciences. Attendance of the complementary course "Data Sources in Social Sciences" is highly recommended as the course illustrates the practical application of the methods in Stata and deepens understanding of the theoretical content of the lecture.

Lab Course "Data Sources in Social Sciences"

Using Stata we practice methods of longitudinal data analysis (especially first-difference-models, random/fixed effects-models, event history analysis) with examples mainly from the German SOEP. Attendance of the complementary lecture " Longitudinal Data Analysis " is highly recommended as firm knowledge of the lecture content is presumed. In addition, a further prerequisite for participation is firm knowledge of data preparation and estimation of simple linear regressions in Stata.

Suggested Readings:

  • Blossfeld, H.-P., K. Golsch, and G. Rohwer (2009): Event History Analysis with Stata. New York/ London: Psychology Press. [But avoid the philosophical part of the book on causality in chapter 1]
  • Andreß, H.J.,K. Golsch, and A. Schmidt (2013) Applied Panel Data Analysis for Economic and Social Surveys. Springer.

6 ECTS will be awarded for successful completion of an exam and an additional 2 ECTS can be awarded for participation in the lab course and submission of two practical assignments.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
Lecture
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
10:15
11:45
B 244 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Tutorial
Lab Course
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursday
10:15
11:45
C-108 (PC/Methods Lab) in A 5, 6 Bauteil C


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Course Content

In this seminar, we will deal with models of item response theory (IRT) and their applications. After a review of some models of classical test theory, students will learn about different IRT models for categorical data. We will cover the Rasch model, the two-, and the three-parameter logistic model (for binary data) as well as models for polytomous data. We will discuss applications such as differential item functioning (DIF) or computerized adaptive testing (CAT), and standard software (e.g., R) will be used for illustrative data analyses.

 

Literature

  • Embretson, S. E., & Reise, S. P. (2000). Item response theory for psychologists. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Moosbrugger, H., & Kelava, A. (Eds.). (2012). Testtheorie und Fragebogenkonstruktion (2nd ed.). doi:10.1007/978-3-642-20072-4
  • Rost, J. (2004). Lehrbuch Testtheorie - Testkonstruktion (2nd ed.). Göttingen: Huber.
  • Strobl, C. (2012). Das Rasch-Modell: Eine verständliche Einführung für Studium und Praxis. Mering: Rainer Hampp.

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesday
13:45
15:15
EO 242 Seminarraum

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 6

Course Content

This course gives an overview of the design and implementation of survey questionnaires from the operationalization of the research questions to their implementation in a full questionnaire. Topics covered include operationalizing research questions, guidelines for writing survey questions, testing questions with cognitive interviews and eye-tracking, ordering the questionnaire, the effect of survey modes and questionnaire design in cross-cultural research. The course will be taught in a mix of seminar-style sessions, where the literature on questionnaire design is presented and discussed, and hands-on practical sessions, where students design and test survey questions.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
19.02.16
Friday
13:45
15:15
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
11.03.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
15.04.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
20.05.16
Friday
13:45
18:45
A 102 in B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 4

Course Content

In this seminar, we will learn how to use R, a powerful programming language that is often used for statistical analyses, simulations, and cognitive modeling. The first half of the seminar aims at a basic understanding of R covering the basic functionality such as objects, functions, data management, plotting, and simple optimization.

In the second half of the seminar, we will discuss advanced topics depending on the interest of the seminar participants. Possible topics are:
* Writing an own R package
* Linear models (ANOVA, regression, mixed models)
* Item response theory
* Monte-Carlo simulations (robustness of statistical analyses, parallel computing)
* Cognitive modeling (e.g., signal detection or multinomial processing trees)

It is planned that participants work on small group projects such as analyzing own data, replicating a paper, or running a small simulation. These projects will be presented in the last sessions.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesday
13:45
15:15
EO 162 CIP-Pool, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich neben den Mitgliedern der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) auch an alle anderen Studierenden, Doktoranden und Nachwuchswissenschaftler in den Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften. Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme sind solide Kenntnisse in multivariaten Analyseverfahren und erste praktische Erfahrungen mit der Datenanalyse. Kenntnisse im Arbeiten mit dem SOEP werden nicht vorausgesetzt. In den Beispielen und Übungen im Rahmen des Workshops wird ausschließlich das Statistikprogrammpaket STATA verwendet.

Die Teilnahmegebühr  beträgt 50 Euro (reduziert für Studierende auf 20 Euro).

Anmeldungen sind ab dem 21. März 2016 und bis zum 20. Mai 2016 möglich. Registrierungen nach Ablauf der Anmeldefrist bitte per E-Mail an 'gess(at)uni-mannheim.de.
Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 35 begrenzt. Nach Ablauf der Anmeldefrist schicken wir ihnen eine Anmeldebestätigung mit Details, wie die Teilnahmegebühr zu entrichten ist.


Course Content

Das SOEP ist eine seit 1984 laufende jährliche Wiederholungsbefragung in Deutschland. Es ist eine der am längsten laufenden Panelstudien weltweit. Themenschwerpunkte sind unter anderem Haushaltszusammensetzung, Erwerbs- und Familienbiographie, Erwerbsbeteiligung und berufliche Mobilität, Einkommensverläufe, Gesundheit und Lebenszufriedenheit. Das Arbeiten mit einem komplexen Längsschnittdatensatz wie dem SOEP bietet viele Möglichkeiten, fordert aber auch spezielle Kenntnisse. Der Workshop bietet daher die Möglichkeit, einen fundierten Einblick in das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP zu erhalten. Grundsätzlich werden Kenntnisse in zwei Bereichen vermittelt. Zum einen wird ein Überblick über die Analysemöglichkeiten des SOEP gegeben und eine Einführung in die Datenaufbereitung gegeben. Zum anderen werden Analyseverfahren für Längsschnittdaten vorgestellt (Panelregression); einschließlich von Übungen auf Basis des SOEP. Zusammen bieten beide Teile eine Grundlage für eigene Forschungsarbeiten mit dem SOEP und ähnlichen Längsschnittdatensätzen.

Der Workshop wird von der Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences (GESS) in Zusammenarbeit mit der Längsschnittstudie "Sozio-oekonomisches Panel"/DIW Berlin veranstaltet. Lokaler Ausrichter ist der Lehrstuhl für Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung (Professor Dr. Thomas Gautschi). Für die Teilnahme an dem Kurs und das Erfüllen von Aufgaben im Anschluss können 3 ECTS vergeben werden.

 

Kursprogramm:

Montag 27.06.2016:
Der erste Tag bietet eine anwendungsorientierte Einführung in den Aufbau, die Inhalte und das Arbeiten mit dem SOEP. Im Rahmen des allgemeinen Überblicks wird auch auf aktuelle Innovationen im SOEP eingegangen. Neben einer Darstellung, wie die SOEP-Daten effizient aufbereitet werden können, sind im Rahmen der Übungen am Nachmittag auch Beratungen zu individuellen Fragestellungen vorgesehen. Weitergehende Einzelberatungen sind am Folgetag möglich. Leitung: Alexandra Fedorets & Knut Wenzig (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 9.45 Begrüßung
  • 10:00-11.15 Einführung in das SOEP
  • 11:15-11:30 Pause
  • 11:30-13:00 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Datenstruktur, SOEPinfo
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15:45 Arbeiten mit dem SOEP: Aufbereitung von Querschnitts- und Längsschnittsdatensätzen
  • 15:45-16:00 Pause
  • 16:00-18:00 Stichprobenziehung und Gewichtung im SOEP
  • 19:00 Gemeinsames Abendessen (fakultativ)

Dienstag 28.06.2016:
Am zweiten Tag werden grundlegende Regressionsmodelle für Paneldaten vorgestellt. Dieser Kursabschnitt richtet sich dabei ausdrücklich an Anfänger der Panelanalyse und setzt lediglich Vorwissen zu multivariaten Analyseverfahren voraus. Am Vormittag werden die Modelle erläutert. Am Nachmittag wird deren Anwendung anhand eines SOEP-Beispiels demonstriert. Danach besteht für TeilnehmerInnen, die ein eigenes Forschungsprojekt planen oder das SOEP bereits nutzen, die Möglichkeit spezifische Fragen individuell zu besprechen.
Leitung: Marco Giesselmann (SOEP/DIW Berlin)

  • 10:30-13:00 Einführung in die Analyse von Paneldaten: Einfache Regression, Fixed Effects Regression
  • 13:00-14:00 Mittagspause
  • 14:00-15.15 Random Effects Regression
  • 15.15-15.30 Pause
  • 15.30-17.00 Hybride Regressionen

Mittwoch, 29. Juni 2016
Am dritten Tag wird mit Propensity Score Matching ein weiteres Analyseverfahren dargestellt. Neben einer allgemeinen Einführung werden auch Kombinationsmöglichkeiten mit Verfahren der Längsschnittanalyse (u.a. Difference-in-differences Matching) gezeigt. Wie am Vortag schließen sich praktische Übungen mit dem SOEP an eine theoretische Einführung an.
Leitung: Giuseppe Pietrantuono (Universität Mannheim)

  • 09:30-12:30: Propensity Score Matching
  • 12:30-14:00: Pause
  • 14:00-17:00: Propensity Score Matching

Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
Block
27.06.16
29.06.16
Monday to Wednesday
09:30
18:00
C -108 (PC-lab) in A5, 6

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET

Credits: 7

Prerequisites

  • Contents of an introductory course on systematic reviews and meta-analysis (e.g., the ones offered by the course instructor at the University of Mannheim in the following semesters: FSS 2015, or HWS 2014, or FSS 2014).
  • M.Sc. or PhD thesis topic has been (at least roughly) defined already
  • Basic understanding of R ( www.r-project.org )

Course Content

This course will assist students to prepare, conduct, and to write-up a systematic review and/or meta-analysis for a M.Sc. or PhD thesis, encompassing the entire research synthesis process, namely:

  • Developing a problem statement and specifying research questions / hypotheses for a systematic review / meta-analysis;
  • Data collection (systematic retrieval and selection of studies);
  • Data extraction, coding, and unifying effect sizes;
  • Analysis and interpretation;
  • Reporting / writing a thesis encompassing a systematic review / meta-analysis.
  • Special emphasis will be on the analysis procedure (4) using R packages (esp. metafor: www.metafor-project.org ).

Literature:

Bornstein, M., Hedges, L.V., Higgins, J.P.T, & Rothstein, H.R. (2009). Introduction to Meta-Analysis. Chichester, UK: Wiley.

Card, N.A. (2011). Applied Meta-Analysis for the Social Sciences. New York: Guilford Press.

Cooper, H. (2010). Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: A Step-by-Step Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Cooper, H., Hedges, L.V., & Valentine, J.C. (Eds.) (2009). Handbook of Research Synthesis (2nd ed.). New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (2004). Methods of meta-analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lipsey, M.W., & Wilson, D.B. (2001). Practical Meta-analysis. Thousand Oaks: Sage.


Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
03.02.16
Wednesday
15:15
16:45
EO 259, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost
17.02.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
every three weeks
02.03.16
13.04.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
biweekly
27.04.16
11.05.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A
01.06.16
Wednesday
15:15
18:30
A 305, B 6, 23-25 Bauteil A


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: MET/POL

Credits: 6+2

Prerequisites

Knowledge of Multivariate Analysis


Course Content

This course serves  as an introduction to a multitude of probability models that are appropriate when the linear model is inadequate. After introducing the fundamentals from which statistical models are developed, this course will focus on one specific theory of inference, namely on the statistical theory of maximum likelihood. We will also devote considerable time to statistical programming, simulating and conveying quantities of material interest of such models (using R).

Course Readings:

  • Eliason, Scott R. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Newbury Park: Sage.
  • King, Gary. 2008. Unifying political methodology: the likelihood theory of statistical inference. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Students who wish to pass this course must complete homework assignments and produce a research paper. Participation in the tutorial session (2 ECTS) is necessary for the assignments which complement the lecture (6 ECTS).


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
17.02.16
01.06.16
Wednesdays
08:30
10:00
B 143 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Tutorial
18.02.16
02.06.16
Thursdays
08:30
10:00
C -108 Methodenlabor in A 5, 6 Bauteil C

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/SOC

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

t.b.a.


Course Content

The main goal of this lecture is to present an advanced introduction to theoretical approaches, key concepts, and substantive issues in comparative political sociology. Building on a multi-level perspective, it will provide an overview of key concepts and theories in the analysis of micro-level processes of political behavior that are embedded in and feed into macro-level processes. Capitalizing on this analytical perspective, the lecture will also show major changes in the relationship between societal and political processes and institutions.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Lecture
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
10:15
11:45
B 244 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: POL/SOC

Credits: 8

Prerequisites

Credit points can be obtained for a paper (8,000 words), the oral presentation of this paper, as well as active participation during the sessions.


Course Content

Comparison is essential to research in political sociology. At the same time, it raises multiple issues of comparability and equivalence. What is ‘similar’, what is ‘different’? And how can we figure out whether measures are equivalent or not? In this seminar, we will address the conceptual and methodological issues in measurement in comparative political research. Students will review the latest empirical studies in the field and prepare research papers in which they analyze specific questions using available data sets.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
16.02.16
31.05.16
Tuesdays
12:00
13:30
B 317 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: RES

Credits: 5

Prerequisites

  • Foundations of linear algebra and probability theory (high school level)
  • Computer skills that allow you to get familiar with complex applications fast

Course Content

The course presents methods for the computer assisted automatic analysis of digital documents as a basis for further quantitative content analyses used in social and cultural sciences.

In the beginning we will present some possible analyses computational linguistics can offer to social and cultural sciences using the software GATE. This is followed by a short programming course in the Python programming language introducing a more flexible way of pre-processing texts and also access to text data through web crawling and conversion of different file formats. More advanced methods on text classification and clustering are presented later on along with more tools that can be used. In the final part of the course participants will present their own project work to each other.

Passing the course is based on:

  • Implementation of a project
  • Final presentation
  • Report (~ 15 pages)

 Motivation / Trigger

  • Analyzing the 2016 Presidential Candidates on Twitter:

         http://www.doz.com/social-media/2016-presidential-candidates-on-twitter

  • Building applications like:

          http://www.stockfluence.com

          https://www.stockpulse.de/en

          http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/6-social-media-monitoring-tools/


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Workshop
08.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A 5, 6
22.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6
29.04.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6
Presentations
20.05.16
Friday
12:00
17:00
C-108 PC-Lab in A5, 6

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: SOC

Credits: 6

Course Content

Cross-national public support of the welfare state often mirrors the type of the welfare state. For example, the Swedish public is highly supportive of the welfare state and they have a larger more comprehensive welfare state, whereas the United States’ public is less supportive and they have a lean and tax-based welfare state. However, in almost all rich democratic welfare states, a majority are in favor of government provision of basic welfare needs such as pensions, health care, family benefits, and unemployment protection. In the past 30 years, globalization, ageing populations and increasing complexities in laws create pressures to retrench welfare states. Arguably, strong public support of the welfare state prevents retrenchment.
 
On the surface, welfare states are not shrinking. Social spending as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product remains at its current levels or even increased in many welfare states, and pensions and unemployment insurance provide income replacement similar to 10 and 20 years ago. Nonetheless, retrenchment is taking place. It exists mostly below the surface because policymakers hide retrenchments from the public. They know that the public will react with severity if they see outright reductions or terminations in welfare provision. Majority public support of the welfare state also exists on the surface. However, when members of the public are asked more detailed questions the welfare state often loses popularity. For example, when individuals believe that those taking up benefits do not deserve the benefits, or when the recipient of benefits is long-term unemployed and an immigrant. Also, individuals support the welfare state, but when asked if they will fund it through increased taxes they tend to say ‘no’.
 
This seminar will introduce the main theoretical and methodological approaches in studying public attitudes towards the welfare state. It will discuss cross-national and longitudinal survey analyses of major social policy areas and selected reform topics. Participants are expected to read and critically discuss the literature. For full credit they have to write a seminar paper based on either a meta-review of the research literature or their own empirical analysis of a social survey

 

Key readings:

Pierson, Paul. 2004. “Positive Feedback and Path Dependence.” Pp. 17–53 in Politics in Time: History, Institutions and Social Analysis. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Brooks, Clem and Jeff Manza. 2006. “Social Policy Responsiveness in Developed Democracies.” American Sociological Review 71(3):474–94.
 


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
15.02.16
30.05.16
Monday
15:30
17:00
B 143 in A 5, 6 Bauteil B

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: SOC

Credits: 6

Course Content

In this advanced seminar, we will examine how multiple types of networks give rise to political action. Such networks may include direct political allegiances, as in party membership, as well as alternative economic, religious, ethnic or regional affiliations that channel political action. Substantive topics include, among others: coalition formation and dissolution in such fragmented party systems as in Italy; the role of clientele networks in shaping political institutions in developing countries; the mechanisms whereby social networks facilitate cooperative behavior in settings with little social capital to begin with; and institutional mechanisms whereby social networks reinforce or undermine political polarization. The emphasis throughout the seminar is on understanding empirical puzzles. To this end, we will primarily consider recent empirical studies on political networks in the social sciences.


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
18.04.16
30.05.16
Monday
10:15
13:30
121, Parkring 47

Lecturer(s)


Course Type: elective course

Course Number: SOC

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Interest in engaging in theoretical and empirical research, basic knowledge in statistical analysis and in a statistics software program (stata, spss).


Course Content

Attitudes towards foreigners: Research seminar


Immigration has many diverse effects on contemporary modern societies. It affects demographic processes, social inequality, and many other realms of the social life. The social changes associated with migration provoke suspicion, insecurity, and fear on the side of the native public.  With the help of national studies like the ALLBUS and international studies like ESS or the ISSP, the social sciences have the tools to describe these attitudes, and develop a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying their emergence. International differences in levels of xenophobia suggest that macro-level characteristics play a role in the emergence of anti-foreigner sentiment. Theories also stress the relevance of perceived or actual individual competition with the foreigners, which involves both material and cultural resources.
In the first part of the course, we shall discuss the theoretical background of the phenomenon we wish to explain, with the help of different studies. In the second part of the course, students will develop a research question based on the theories, and engage in its empirical examination using secondary data resources.


Basic literature:

  • Jackson, L. M. (2011). The Psychology of Prejudice: From Attitudes to Social Action (7-28). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association.
  • Esses, V. M., Jackson, L. M., & Armstrong, T. L. (1998). Intergroup competition and attitudes toward immigrants and immigration: An instrumental model of group conflict. Journal of Social Issues, 54(4), 699-724.
  • Kohler, U., and Kreuter, F. (2001): Datenanalyse mit Stata. Allgemeine Konzepte der Datenanalyse und ihre praktische Anwendung. München / Wien: Oldenbourg.

Material


Schedule

Type
From
To
Weekday
From
To
Room
Material
Seminar
biweekly
19.02.16
27.05.16
Friday
08:30
11:45
C -108 methods lab in A 5, 6 Bauteil C

Register

Social Sciences Spring 2016

Dissertation Tutorial: Sociology (Gautschi/Hillmann/Kreuter)
Dissertation Tutorial: Sociology (Kogan/Kalter/Ebbinghaus)
DIS
Dissertation Proposal Workshop
RES
CDSS Workshop: Sociology
RES
English Academic Writing
RES
MZES A Colloquium "European Societies and their Integration"
MET
5th GESIS Summer School in Survey Methodology
MET
Bayesian Statistics for Social Scientists II: Advanced Bayesian Models
MET
Big Data in the Social Sciences
MET
Data Collection: Interviewers and Interviewer Effects
MET
Longitudinal Data Analysis (Lecture + Lab Course)
MET
New Developments in Test Theory and Test Construction
MET
Questionnaire Design and Implementation
MET
Research and applied methods: Programing in R
MET
SOEPcampus - Längsschnittdatenanalyse mit dem Sozio-oekonomischen Panel
MET
Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis
MET/POL
Advanced Quantitative Methods
POL/SOC
Comparative Political Sociology
POL/SOC
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Travelling across time and space: Conceptual and measurement issues in comparative political sociology
RES
Computer-based Content Analysis (Bridge Course)
SOC
Economy & the Welfare State: Is the Welfare State so Popular and Why? Comparing Attitudes toward Social Policies
SOC
Economy & the Welfare State: Political Networks
SOC
Migration & Integration 'Attitudes towards foreigners – theory and practice'
DIS
CDSS Workshop: Political Science
RES
MZES B Colloquium "European Political Systems and their Integration"
RES
SFB 884 Seminar Series
POL
Comparative Government: Political Institutions
POL
International Political Economy
POL
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Roll call voting. Theory, Methods, and Applications
POL
Selected Topics in International Politics: Civil War Dynamics and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding
POL
Selected Topics in International Politics: International Politics
POL
Selected Topics in International Politics: The Politics of the United Nations
RES
AC4/BC4: Colloquia II
RES
CDSS Workshop: Research in Cognitive Psychology
RES
CDSS Workshop: Research in Social Cognition
PSY
Advanced Social and Economic Cognition
PSY
Formal Modeling of Cognitive Processes
PSY
Introduction to Social Cognitive Neuroscience (Part 2
PSY
Neural Signatures of Cooperation and Competition during Social Exchange